How are we supposed to read 5GHz WiFi signal strength bands?

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wrote:

Wrong. The SSID is used as a "salt" to do WPA/WPA2 encryption. The rainbow tables are only useful if the SSID of the system that you're attacking is the same as one of the SSID's in the rainbow table. Using a common SSID listed on Wigle improves the probability of a successful attack. I use my address.
<http://www.renderlab.net/projects/WPA-tables/ <https://wigle.net/stats#ssidstats
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Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I don't even bother hiding my SSID. Nothing important in my home network. My lawyer, bank, accountant keeping important stuffs.
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wrote:

This is one reason why I hate security discussions. If you really think there's nothing important on your home computah, then I suggest you test this. Install a program that does a recursive text search on all your files. For Windoze, I use Agent Ransack: <https://www.mythicsoft.com/agentransack Plug in your social security number, checking account numbers, and credit card numbers, and see what it finds. The idea is to obtain enough info to perform an identity theft. I was rather surprised to find both on my machine. While WPA2 cracking is usually just to gain access to a faster or more convenient internet connection, it's not beneath the dignity of most casual hackers to make some money on the side.
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On Thu, 27 Aug 2015 11:20:05 -0600, Tony Hwang wrote:

It doesn't seem like you understand the problem. Maybe you do, but it doesn't seem like you do.
The problem is they used, as a salt, the ESSID!
That's a pretty dumb salt.
It's even a dumber salt if the owner leaves the ESSID at the default values, or, if the owner changes the ESSID to something common.
Because of that, anyone with the tables already has your hash and is on your wireless network already.
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On 08/27/2015 12:29 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Don't name your WiFi network "monkey".
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On Thu, 27 Aug 2015 13:26:40 -0500, Sam E

The SSID can be 1 to 32 characters. One of my customers set his SSID to "*". I forgot exactly what it broke, but I do recall spending a week failing to fix what I thought were unrelated problem. When I changed the SSID to something reasonable, all the weirdness went away. This was quite a while ago so presumably it's now fixed.
Another fun SSID is "ANY". I don't recall what it was suppose to do, but it was thrown into some long forgotten manufacturers firmware to allow any device to connect, probably for repeaters and range extenders. Try it and see what breaks.
Also try "Free Public WiFi" which is really a Microsoft XP bug. <http://www.npr.org/2010/10/09/130451369/the-zombie-network-beware-free-public-wifi
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On 08/26/2015 06:31 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

It could affect how attractive your network is to a potential intruder.
So, indirectly, it is affecting security since it makes the difference on whether or not someone tries to get in.
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On 08/25/2015 05:06 PM, ceg wrote:

I have been in a nearby city, where there are a lot of college students. I don't see "home" but I do often see ISP names or router brand names. It looks like an attempt by sellers to provide unique SSIDs, and users who don't change the defaults.
Where I live, I don't see prefixes like that, but I do see some interesting names like "FBI Surveillance" and "ThisIsNoyTheWiFiYou'reLookingFor".
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CEG,
Puzzling that your graph or chart on the right does not have a labelled "x" axis. What is it showing? If it is meant to be like the chart on the left then that suggests that you do not have anything but noise at 5 gHz. Looks like a lot of noise.
Dave M.
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On Sun, 23 Aug 2015 10:31:36 -0400, David L. Martel wrote:

At home, I can see better what is going on.
The 5GHz graph from Wifi Analyzer freeware has signal strength on the Y axis (-30dBm at the top line, then -40dBm, -50dBm, -60dBm, -70dBm, -80dBm, and -90dBm on the first line above the x axis, where the y intercept must be at -100dBm Signal Strength.
The X axis isn't labeled, but it must just be time since I can watch the graphs grow from one side to the other in about two minutes time.
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On 23/08/2015 06:45, ceg wrote:

You could start by choosing the same graph format for both images and then actually choosing the 5Ghz one for the one on the right (hint no 5G displayed)
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On Sun, 23 Aug 2015 15:56:04 +0100, Lee wrote:

I don't think you get any option to choose anything, least of all the graph format.
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wrote:

While viewing the 2.4GHz chart, tap the screen once. You'll see a freq band indicator over on the left, near the -db scale. If you do nothing, the freq indicator times out and disappears again, but if you tap it while it's visible, the screen switches to the 5GHz band.
What you're calling the 5GHz chart is really just another view of the 2.4GHz chart. You *swiped* to get there. You need to tap.
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On Sun, 23 Aug 2015 10:01:03 -0500, Char Jackson wrote:

Oooooooooooooh. I *did* swipe to see what I was calling the 5GHz chart! (How did you know?)
I see now, that it's the *same* chart, only over time instead of over frequency! (slaps head ... duh) It was just frequency versus time for the x axis between the two charts. (embarrassed).
I see I have 5 options for viewing that 2.4GHz chart: 1. Channel graph 2. Time graph 3. Channel rating 4. AP list 5. Signal meter
If I *tap* at the top left (near the top of the y axis), then I see a box with "2G" and "5G" alternatively, as I tap that box.
Geeeeeeez. I feel stoooopid.
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On Sun, 23 Aug 2015 05:45:56 +0000 (UTC), ceg

No, it's not. We've been through this before. If your smartphone supports 5GHz wi-fi, Wi-Fi Analyzer will produce a square box, near the upper left hand corner of the screen, just below the "W" in "WiFi Analyzer" with either 2.4G or 5G inside the box. The problem is that the box disappears. Tap that area and the box will magically appear. Tap it again to toggle modes. Also, if you're looking at 5G and no SSID's are showing, the program will magically switch back to 2.4G.
The mess you were looking at on the right is the signal strength versus time graphs. Too bad the author of WiFi Analyzer didn't bother adding page titles.
You're not done yet. I've noticed that several "smart" devices, such as cheapo cell phone and tabloids, that are allegedly dual band, turn off the unused band when connected to an access point. The result is that WiFi Analyzer pretends that there's no 5G in the device. Disconnecting from your access point should solve that problem.
Also, there's something wrong with your Comcast connection. Your download speed is fine, but you should be getting about 12 Mbits/sec upstream. At least that's what I've been seeing at various customers. Winner of the highest residential speed award so far was about 160/30 in Felton with a Comcast Cisco DPC3939: <http://mydeviceinfo.comcast.net/device.php?devid57 There's suitable conspiracy here, but I promised not to tell.
Leak of the week (which means you didn't read this here): Comcast Business class will also get a boost in speed on Thurs, Aug 27. Reboot your modems in order to see the improvement. I pried this out of a Comcast installer last week. If it doesn't happen on time, I'll claim that this was a forgery and that I never said it.
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On Sun, 23 Aug 2015 10:34:24 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I only just now realized that what you are saying it totally correct! I was wrong. I misinterpreted what I was seeing. And that's why it confused me.

Now I see that, since I have far fewer access points at home.

When I tap the top left, I do get a 5G and a 2G box, alternating with each other. So, WiFi Analyzer does seem to see both.

That's interesting. It's the kid's Comcast setup. I'm at home now, so, I can't test it. But they get about 90 down on 5GHz and about 5 or 6 up.
On 2.4GHz, they get only about 30 down and about 5 or 6 up.
The "service", as I recall, is nominally 45 down and 5 up. So, should they really be getting double the upload speeds?
Should we complain to Comcast since it's at least 5Gbps?

I wonder what "Business Class" is. Are these kids in Business Class? It's an apartment building with a lot of kids in it (all from the school) but it's an off-campus building.
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Does that app exist for iOS? I didn't see it.
On 8/22/2015 10:45 PM, ceg wrote:

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Nope. Apple has decided that you should not be allowed to install wi-fi sniffer, monitor, and troubleshooting applications on Apple handsets. Apple knows what is best for you. This is typical: <http://www.adriangranados.com/blog/where-did-wifi-analyzer-go Limitations like this is why I gave up on IOS long ago.
Of course, that's why people jailbreak their iPhones. Try the Cydia store on your jailbroken iThing: <https://cydia.saurik.com Firing up my ancient iPhone 3G (jailbroken), I find - yFyLite Network Finder and nothing else. There might be something newer. I just ran Cydia to see if there's anything new, and it's furiously updating packages and indexes. Yawn... Argh, this thing is slow. How could I ever have used it? The Cydia listing shows a huge list of WiFi related utilities. A few are similar to WiFi Analyzer. The others are connection managers and password managers. Most are useless tweaks changing the stock signal stength icon to something more interesting. One I recall from long ago is WiFiFoFum with its goofy radar like display.
Of course, if you have a laptop, Apple allows Wi-Fi monitoring for OS/X: <https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/wifi-explorer/id494803304?mt > <https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/wifi-signal/id525912054?mt > Any semblance to hypocrisy is hopefully coincidental.
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