How are truss plates installed at a factory

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On 1/3/2013 10:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

W/ automated presses. At factory they have jigs generally for an entire truss set up where all the pieces are placed in and then either all are pressed w/ multiple-head press or in sequence if don't have that big a setup.
There are individual presses available but actual truss plates aren't really intended to be hand-applied.
What gear is around looks something like
<http://www.eaglemetal.com/equipment.php
You'll have no success w/ just a hammer coming close to meeting Code reqmt's for anything excepting the small connectors/hangers, cross-bracing, etc., etc., ... A regular truss plate is almost impossible to install successfully w/o a press for the purpose.
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Hmm...I stood my 2 x 8 beam on top of a couple of 8' 4 x 4's, flush with the outer edges, and hammered Home Depot truss plates across the seams to secure them. The deck is then cantilevered about 3' off of that beam.
It only wobbles a little. ;-)
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On 1/3/2013 3:54 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

:)
I will, however, hold to my supposition that an ANSI test wouldn't pass on that... :)
I read somewhere that one of the deck failures in KC a few years ago may have been owing at least in part to that type of on-site connection.
You have, I hope, added some other fasteners???
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In reality there are three 4 x 4's sandwiched between two 14’ 2 x 8 beams. The beams are attached to each of the posts with 2 carriage bolts, slightly staggered.
Very similar to this, except that my deck is only 6’ off the ground.
http://www.nachi.org/forum/attachments/f16/27581d1237737433-deck-support-illustration-100_2761-small-.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/Deckbeam
25 years, no wobble.
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On Fri, 4 Jan 2013 04:25:15 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Personally looking at this picture, I don't like the stability of the columns in the plane of the 3 columns. If it were me, I'd add some knee braces but in your case since the columns are shorter, may be fine.
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I agree that the deck in the picture looks like it could use some diagonals.
The other thing I noticed - and it may just be because of all of the angles in photo - is that the AC unit does not look level. That would concern me due to the fan spinning while tilted. Maybe I'm just way too anal, but I would level the unit.
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On Fri, 4 Jan 2013 05:52:37 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Good point. I didn't look too closely at the a/c but if you are right about it not being level, I total agree with you.
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wrote:

being moved. The compressor/condenser on the other hand may be sensitive to slope - work tilted one way but not the other??
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On Sat, 05 Jan 2013 13:39:45 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sounds reasonable so maybe I'm wrong. Still will try to remember to ask my a/c guy who I hope I don't need to see for a long time <g>.
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On 1/3/2013 10:25 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I figured you wouldn't have not, but...
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At least these are more of a home operated unit, but I'm sure they are costly. They dont list the prices on their site.
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On Thu, 03 Jan 2013 21:56:21 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

normal ones new are about $10,000.
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On Thu, 03 Jan 2013 23:17:53 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

http://www.wasserman-associates.com/ccs/Wasserman_Used_List.php?Category_Items1Page=9&PHPSESSID qoe4209uvf3u59imj7fo2sk1
14 foot gantry roller for $4000, c clamp presses for $1250, Gantry press for $8000 etc, etc.
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On 1/3/2013 10:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: ...

Truss not failing for lack of proper plate installation--priceless...
:)
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:-) Good Point !!! I was talking about the philosophy of engineering design.

Right, all beams and trusses need light lateral support on the compression flange or you can get failure as you described. The lateral support must be at a specified spacing per code. If my memory is correct, what you described is called buckling failure or to expand on the words... buckling failure of the compression flange. You sound like you are engineering aware or just observant. Most people are neither :-( .
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On 1/6/2013 1:25 PM, Doug wrote: ...

BSNE, MS Phys(NucSci)
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On Thu, 03 Jan 2013 10:37:32 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

They use a hydraulic press but I have done it with the smaller ones using a 1/4" steel plate and a 16 pound sledge.
BTW if you look at the ones at the hardware store, it says "not for trusses" right on them. Inspectors will look for that if you do not have the engineering from the truss plant stapled to your plan. They may reject them anyway if you don't have engineering.
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On Thu, 03 Jan 2013 15:16:38 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I never saw those words on them, but I dont see small print without reading glasses, and I dont wear glasses when I build. At the same time, that is pretty stupid. They are called TRUSS PLATES, yet they are not for trusses...... WTF?
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On Jan 3, 7:23pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

No glasses when nailing stuff cost me my left eye. Safety glasses were laying within arms reach when it happened. Started nail, misstrike and ZING Lacerted eye on the way by.
Harry K
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On Jan 3, 4:37pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

In the factory they are pressed in hydraulically. The only way I've been able to install them satisfactorily is with two metal plates and a big G clamp. Even then had to move the clamp about. I don't find them much good for manual use.
I use bolts, big washers and timber connectors (spikey washers) for stuff like roofs.
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