How are truss plates installed at a factory

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How are truss plates installed at a factory?
I've tried to install these things with a hammer, and it just dont work. They get all dented up and just dont make a good fastner. Apparently these factories have a press that pushes the whole plate into the wood.
Just to be clear, I'm referring to these:
http://imgusr.tradekey.com/o-B49328-20061003073454/truss-plate-nail-plate.jpg
(randomly chosen website to obtain a picture).
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On Jan 3, 8:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Yes they do. I had the same problem with the few I have used.
Harry K
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On Thursday 03 January 2013 16:41 Harry K wrote in alt.home.repair:

nail-p...
Which is weird (and slightly worrying) because you can go to any builder's or timber merchant and see them for sale.
Don't you usually add some 1" flat head nails if applying by hand?
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wrote:

Yes, they are sold at all building supply places and hardware stores. I really never understood why either....
I've never built trusses, but made frames for barn doors, where the 2x4s are laid flat. All those truss plates did was piss me off. I finally bought the plain flat steel ones with lots of holes in them, and pounded in a fistful of roofing nails in each plate. At least those work. The last door I built, I didn't have any of those things on hand, so I just took some scrap galvanized tin from furnace ducts, cut out squares, and drove a lot of roofing nails thru the metal. Worked fine, and saved a few bucks too.
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Yes, they even have special nails just for that. But there is nothign wierd about it. Talk to the bean counters about how much cheaper and more effieient it is to press them in than pay a guy to hammer them in.
Harry K
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There must be some sort of tool made to install these things at home. They sure are popular these days. Actually, I did install one of them using a press (of sorts). I was just seeing if it would work on some scrap lumber. The results were better than using a hammer, but not really acceptable. I parked my farm tractor where I planned to use the truss plate. Then placed the boards on a flat concrete surface, (under one edge of the tractor). I placed the truss plate across the boards. Then put a heavy piece of 1/2" thick steel on top of the truss plate. Took my handyman jack, put the base of the jack on top of that piece of steel, and jacked up the tractor. The weight of the jack and tractor did push the pins from the truss plate into the wood, but it was not even. I suppose the jack was not exactly centered and/or weight not evenly distributed as the tractor was raised.
In the end, the result was better than using a hammer, but I still had to use a hammer to even it out, and some of the pins had bent rather than gone into the wood.
Not the ideal situation and it would be a lot of work to make a large truss in this way, if not impossible because there is limited space under the tractor tires. However, it was an experiment.
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On 1/3/2013 8:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

My father worked for a few years at a family friends truss mfg plant. Yes, the plates are all applied using a hydraulic press.
Paul
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wrote:

Exactly what I thought. But that does make me question why they are sold at almost all the home centers and lumber yards????
You'd think that they would sell some sort of installation tool. Although I dont think any hand tool would apply enough pressure. I thought of using C-clamps over heavy steel plates but I dont even need to try it, because you just cant apply enough pressure that way.
I'd like to see a photo of one of these presses they use in a factory. Google didn't find anything (so far).
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On 1/3/2013 12:37 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote: ...

See link I posted earlier...
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On 1/3/2013 12:37 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote: ...

<http://www.clark-ind.com/triAxisPress.aspx
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Holy shit, they are a lot bigger than I thought. It says they press 63 tons. I'd think that would crush the lumber.... No wonder the weight of a farm tractor dont push them in all the way.
Interesting read though! Thanks
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On Thu, 03 Jan 2013 21:29:40 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

It doesn't press the wood. The ram is set to travel only as far as needed.
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On Fri, 04 Jan 2013 02:32:54 -0600, Vic Smith

MOST truss manufacturing uses a roller rather than a press.
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On Jan 4, 9:54 am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I buy my truss plates at the borg and then use one of these rollers to install them. SWMBO understands that I have to use the right tool for the job.
http://www.adsora.com/media/2008/05/roller-derby-calendar9.jpg
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On Jan 5, 12:13 pm, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky- finger.net> wrote:

Change the 9 in the link to any number between 1 & 12, and choose the "roller" of your choice.
Now, follow these segues....
Growing up in NYC, we used to go the Roller Derby at Madison Square Garden quite often.
A great Roller Derby movie to rent is "Rollerball" starring James Caan. It was made in 1975 and set in 2018. Very violent.
If you like "futuristic movies" from the '70's try this one:
"Death Race 2000" Starring David Carradine & Sylvester Stallone (1975) (also very violent)
Another great one from the 70's, although not so much a futuristic plot, is the 1974 movie "Phantom of the Paradise".
I've always referred to it as a rock version of The Phantom of the Opera, but Wikipedia takes it a few steps beyond that:
"Phantom of the Paradise is a 1974 American musical horror film written and directed by Brian De Palma. The story is a loosely adapted mixture of The Phantom of the Opera, The Picture of Dorian Gray, and Faust, and also briefly references Frankenstein, Psycho, and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari."
How can you possibly go wrong with that combination? ;-)
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On 1/5/2013 1:56 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

****Trim Excess****

I have seen both old and new versions of Death Race and they're all fun. I remember "Rollerball" another hoot but I've been a fan of all the futuristic SciFi movies especially the low budget cheesy ones that make me laugh. Me and a lot of my friends love old Japanese monster movies "Rook! Godzirra!". I've been fan of SciFi since I was a kid reading everything I could get my hands on written by the likes of the masters such as Arthur C. Clarke, Theodore Sturgeon, Ray Bradbury and scores of others. It's fun to watch all the old futuristic movies and see things that are common today like video billboards, tablet computers, PDA's, video communications, stun guns, etc. Remember the movie "Blade Runner"? The police cars had multiple flashing lights all over them and what do see today? SciFi was once considered nerdy kid stuff but now it's become mainstream with big budgets and big stars. I suppose one could call it, revenge of the nerds. ^_^
TDD
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OK, this is spooky. I turned on the TV just as I was reading your post. I have my cable box set to default to the Science Channel when powered on.
They are running a marathon of Prophets Of Science Fiction episodes today. It's currently 8:30 here. The 9:00 episode has the following description:
"Philip K. Dick inspired Bladerunner and influenced law enforcement."
Wow!
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On 1/6/2013 7:39 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Wild isn't it? The giant video billboards in the movie were considered SciFi not that many years ago. I can't wait for "Vampire Strippers From Outer Space" to become science fact. ^_^
TDD
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On Fri, 04 Jan 2013 09:54:22 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A roller press. I've only operated vertical presses, and never saw a roller press in action. Seems it would press the plate in starting at some slight angle, and I wonder if there is different tooth design than for plates set with a vertical press. Looked a bit, but still don't know. Hell, I didn't even know they were using trusses for residential roofs. This was interesting. www.woodaware.info/PDFs/Trusses.pdf
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On 1/3/2013 9:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

That's why they're not approved (Code, that is) for hand installation for trusses--it more than a hammer to be certain they're fully set in the material uniformly. (As the other link shows, there are onsite tools for repair/onsite assembly but they're also pretty clunky for the average HO. The rental place here has one I noticed last time I was in there for a magnetic-mount drill...
As another poster says, the travel is limited to not crush the material but to make sure the plate is seated...
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