How a "shoe lace" saved our @#$

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My friend and I went up to the forest to cut firewood today.
We were about 25 miles from the nearest town, and nine miles up a bumpy gravel forest service road when we heard a dragging noise from under the truck. I thought it was a tree branch stuck under the truck.
My friend got out and looked under the truck, then got a look of worry on his face. He said; "We are [expletive deleted]! The tie rod end on the left front wheel is broken off!" (This connects the front two wheels so they both point the same direction when you turn the steering wheel.)
One front wheel was pointing to the left and the other to the right. Not a good situation to be in, especially out in the middle of nowhere.
So then we got on the CB and tried the emergency channel. No luck. Then tried every other channel for 1/2 hour. No luck. We were too far up in the mountains for anyone to receive our signal.
Then my friend got an idea. He used the jack to snap the tie rod back in place. I then tried turning the truck around. It snapped back out of place...
So then we just sat there for a while. Then my friend got another idea. He removed his shoe lace and said let's use this to tie it in place.
So we did just that. Used the jack to snap the tie rod back in place, then held it there with the shoe lace wrapped many times around and tied (long shoe lace).
Then I proceeded to "back up and go forward" about 15 times to slowly turn the truck around (being careful to not turn the steering wheel very much). Eventually I got the truck pointed to go back down the road.
Then we drove very slowly all the way down that forest service road (9 miles) to a main road where we were able to get someone to call a tow truck for us.
So my clever friend and his "shoe lace" got us home!
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Hmmmmmm. Tom
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Thank you for not coming up with the idea that one of you would hold it in place while the other drove slowly. Funny, but a few with lower IQs than you have been hurt/killed doing similar things!
Nice to hear it worked!

truck
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Per MrC1:

When I was *very* young, the fuel pump on my beater went.
I recall laying on the left front fender, feet on the bumper, sort of bracing myself with my left hand, with the hood up, dribbling gasoline into the carburetor while my bud drove us through the back streets of Waikiki with his head sticking out of the drivers side window like the engineer on a train.
--
PeteCresswell


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On Fri, 07 Oct 2005 10:48:51 -0700, "(PeteCresswell)"

Something similar. I had the throttle cable break on my 280Z. After tossing an old moving pad across the engine, I had my bud straddle the engine (rear opening hood) and operate the throttle while I drove.
That actually worked well. He could watch traffic and know when to change speeds, usually. We had to verbally coordinate shifting but that wasn't hard. If I'd gotten scared, I was prepared to stab the clutch and the ignition switch until we got our signals coordinated again.
John
--
John De Armond
See my website for my current email address
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That's another applicatiuon where shoelace comes in handy.
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A bungee did this for me so well I was almost tempted to forget about replacing the tie rod end.
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Actually the caster will keep the wheel in the right direction if you drive forward slowly. I have done it with a farm tractor and a 66 Chrysler.
More than a shoe lace: One weekend while garage sale shopping my VW didn't want to go after a stop sign. The guy behind drove alongside and told me my engine had fallen out! Sure enough, the engine was laying on the pavement, still connected but unable to shift because the linkage was shifted. I got a couple of logs from the nearby creek and levered the engine back up and tied it into place with some rope I had in the car, steel cored so it was strong. Drove the car 30 miles home then 20 miles to a repair shop on Monday.
--
Free men own guns, slaves don\'t
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
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Ford Escort GT, Mt. Washington, overheating on the way up, no electric fan for some reason, used a paperclip to short the fan temperature sensor wiring harness to fix that.
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wrote:

Chevy econobox, along side the road with pretty girl standing along side, between Omaha and Kansas City, middle of nowhere. "It just stopped all of the sudden". A bit of investigation showed no spark, which I traced to the rotor having come apart in the distributor. The rotor had a springy copper tab for the contact, held in place by molten plastic pushed up through holes in the tab. This plastic had sheared off, leaving the rotor to spin with no electrical contact to the wires.
So, I had my full toolkit with me, including some 1/8" sheet metal self-tapping screws (nice for joining ductwork). Pre-drilled two holes where the tab had been held to the rotor, explained that if this went bad, I could destroy her distributor for her, and then screwed the tab to the plastic body of the rotor. Started right up, ran fine. I followed her to her exit without incident.
So, a couple screws overcame a serious GM engineering defect. But, it made a pretty girl's day much less unhappy, and made my drive from Denver to Wisconsin seem a bit shorter that time.
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It's amazing what one can do when properly inspired.
For a couple of screws on the side of a highway I could try to fix anything.
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wrote:

Well, she was cute, and I was single. But the "two screws" was limited, sadly, to the distributor's rotor ;)

You know, I would have truly been dissapointed had _someone_ not taken it there. I caught it on my pre-post read of the message, but decided to send it anyway.
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Surprised no one beat me to the punch!
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This thread is giving me deja vu.
Corvair on East Side Highway, Manhattan. Spring had come off the vacuum advance weights inside the distributor. The vacuum advance weights then rubbed on the inside of the metal base of the distributor and sliced the entire top of the distributor off. When I saw it, it was just hanging there buy the ignition wires.
Put the whole thing back in place and wrapped some of that wire they use for rebar around the distributor and the base.
Drove back to the Bronx and fixed it there with junkyard parts.
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Dave Hinz wrote:

The things that auto manufacturers would do to save a nickel because a nickel times all those cars added up included: Fords built in the early 70's had cheap plastic cam contacts on the points which were glued to the movable arm. Pontiac made an engine with fiber reinforced plastic teeth on the timing gear and they would break at about 35K miles.
--
"Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital.
Capital is the fruit of labor and could not exist
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I remember swapping outhte engine of my 72 campervan on the side of I80 one afternoon..... Cops stopped by a couple times to make sure I was OK, but pretty much let me be.
--JD
wrote:

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Nobody stopped to help?
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Dave Hinz wrote:

Probably didn't have a skirt on :o)
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wrote:

service road (9

someone to call a tow

forget about

direction if you

and a 66

shopping my VW

alongside and

was laying on

the linkage

and levered

had in the

home then 20

once, while I was piloting my spaceship (an old galactica IV, ionic impaction engine still purring away!) about 5.3 parsecs from namola stalartica, . . .
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Gil Faver wrote:

You had spaceships? In our day................
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