Household goods affordability

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According to the Carpe Diem site one had to work 885 hours in 1959 to earn the same goods as one can earn working 170 hours in 2013.
More here: http://tinyurl.com/lrq8suo
One would work about 28 hours to buy a gas stove in 2013 compared to almost 91 hours in 1959. He has ten other examples of decreasing work hours needed to buy given items.
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On Sat, 12 Oct 2013 22:15:48 -0500, Dean Hoffman

Thanks for posting that. I've often used the "how many hours" in discussions. Prices on many goods have come down and are of better quality. Such as the color TV. I also recall paying $5 for a really good white dress shirt (made in USA) in the early 1960's. Not as good quality, but you can get shirts for $15 at discount stores (made in some third world country) .
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And the good quality, american dress shirt is about $60, more or less.
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On Sunday, October 13, 2013 2:31:57 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What American dress shirts for $60? I haven't seen one in years. The typical quality dress shirt made overseas retails for $45 - $60.
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On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 12:25:56 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I buy them for $15-$30, tops. Wait until they're on sale. In the late Winter, it's pretty easy to find long-sleeved shirts (all I wear) at a very good price. Last year I found a bunch of nice Oxfords for about $20.
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On Sunday, October 13, 2013 6:40:10 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Are these made in America or made overseas? Made overseas, I agree you can find them at those prices on sale. But at the large dept stores that typically have the big sales, I haven't seen a made in America dress shirt in years. Not that I specifically went looking for one, but I sure haven't noticed any. I would think there are still some manufacturers left, but I bet they are expensive.
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On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 17:40:15 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Yes, overseas. They're $60 normally.

Only custom made, AFAIK. You aren't getting one for $60, either. I knew a woman who had to have her shirts custom made because of her sleeve length and collar size (*long* and small). She wore men's custom-made shirts because it would have cost a bloody fortune to have them made for a woman (costs a bunch to have the buttons sewn on the other side, ya' know). They were still well over $100 each. That was over 20 years ago.
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On Monday, October 14, 2013 1:16:58 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

We're on the same page. I believed someone else here claimed you could get a USA made dress shirt for $60. I think they do still make some small amount of shirts here, but $60 is more typical of the everyday retail price of an import shirt.
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On Sunday, October 13, 2013 2:31:57 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:


Now there's something with which I'm familiar, since I can never find my si ze at a "discount" store anyway. Apparently clothing manufacturers think t hat anyone ~6' tall must weigh at least 300 lbs, or else having lots of mat erial blousing out around your belt is fashionable.
I finally just gave up and started shopping at more upscale stores, but fin ding a "slim fit" cut dress shirt is still challenging sometimes.
nate
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wrote:

Some, but not all of the unemployment is exporting manufacturing jobs in favor of cheap labor. Many of our economic problems are still the after effects of the housing bubble that was caused by banks and sleazy mortgage brokers.
I've been trying to hire a person for a trainee type maintenance position. I get two types of applicants. One is the 60+ year old guy that was making $25 or more an hour. The other is the young guy that did not finish high school and has a difficult time spelling the name of the street he lives on. .
As for how much are we paying for oil products, not much. Gas was 22¢ a gallon in 1963. Gas is now 16x that but my wage is 21x what is was then so I'm ahead.
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wrote:

Much of the problem is the College Grad themselves. Are they Mechanical engineers? Biologists? No, many of them took 5th Century Greek sculpture as a major and wonder why they can't find a job.
I advertised for a Maintenance type of job. One of my applicants took culinary arts in high school and one year at Johnson & Wales. He never had a wrench in his hand. He quit a coking job because he did not like it.
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On 10/13/13 08:09 am, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

But not so many years ago employers were telling young people, "We don't care what kind of degree you have: the mere fact that you have completed college makes you a more desirable employee."
Perce
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On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 14:21:12 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

There is probably some truth to that, but it is not working. If you earned a college degree, you know how to learn, have some ambition, and I can train you to do my job. I, OTOH, will not hire you for a minimum wage low skill job if you have not finished high school. The kids that drop out are also losers in the workplace. Poor attendance, poor work habits, etc. (exceptions are those older than 40 or so)
Many good jobs do not require a degree but trade school. I know a guy having a hard time finding a HVAC tech for $22 an hour. I have five supervisors, only one with a degree. If I ranked them in order, he is probably #4 of 5. The one ranked #1 has the least education, but the most talent for what we do. And a $65k income.
I wonder if it is too easy to get a college degree these days and aside from specialized skills, even needed. Engineers, doctors, pharmacists all need a lot of education, but a degree does not make you a better middle manager, warehouse supervisor, trucking terminal manager, and the like.
My son has some schooling, but not a degree. He has some talent in the medical field (where he makes his living) and was asked if he'd like to be a doctor or surgeon. His reply, "I don't want to take a pay cut"
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On Sunday, October 13, 2013 3:41:55 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Yeah, there is some truth to it. If you were looking to fill certain positions and you had a choice between someone who got a degree of any kind, ie English, political science, etc, and someone who had no college, the college degree would be worth something.
But it's been well known for decades that a degree in engineering, science, etc has a lot more value than a degree in history. And those graduates are still doing pretty much OK today. If you got a degree in mechanical engineering and took a few computer courses, you can probably find a job as a programmer, web designer, etc. If you get a degree in political science and don't take any computer courses, well good luck. But it's always been like that.
If you

And those jobs also offer the opportunity to start your own business after you've got experience.
I have five

I'd love to see some statistics on whether an MBA really makes you a better manager and if so, by how much. Some of the best and most successful managers, eg Andy Grove, had no business degree. Neither did the Intel founders, Gordon Moore and Bob Noyce. Or Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Jack Welch, etc. Probably 95% of business management is either common sense or thing that can't be learned at a college.

Not to mention all the $$$$ for all the years of additional school and the lost income. Which goes back to what you said about learning a trade, like HVAC or plumbing. Look at what 4 years at a good college costs today. With a lot less money, you could start that HVAC business or some other small business. Or put the $200K into an investment fund. Not saying college isn't worth it, but if you're going to go, you better make sure you pick a degree where the return is going to be worth it.
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On 10/13/2013 2:41 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I gave up on corporate America in the early 1980's due to Affirmative Action where women and minorities were promoted all around me and they couldn't do the job but I could. They didn't want to pay for my skills so I went out on my own and they had to call me when the morons couldn't make anything work. I did take an overseas job for The SDI program but that wasn't permanent. I do a lot of contract labor when I can but I don't have to tolerate ANY male bovine droppings. I can fire customers and have done so when they become troublesome and start to believe I'm their employee. Me and JH will often be the last people called in to fix a problem and when we ask, "Why didn't you call us first?" the answer is often, "You charge too much." I suppose the lack of math comprehension is due to government school education where management will pay three different companies $65/hr for a service call who can't fix it right rather than call us for $85/hr to fix it right the first trip. I know a guy who spent $100.00, $10.00 at a time trying to get an inkjet cartridge refilled rather than pay $30.00 for a remanufactured cartridge. The lack of understanding of simple math among the citizenry drives me nuts. o_O
TDD
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On 10/14/2013 3:44 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

I'm on that list, sadly. I wanted a pressure washer. Electric plug in, for cleaning stuff at work. Bought one from Ebay, $50, which arrived and find out it was missing tips. The Sears guys didn't even admit there was a Craftsman electric pressure washer. Bought a wand and tips at Lowe's for about $65. Came with hose. Find out the pressure switch on unit 1 was defective. Red Sears, Craftsman. So, I bought a blue Campbell Hausfield. That was maybe $60 or so. The high pressure housing cracked after a couple jobs. Plastic!
Went to shop around. Home Depot had one with metal housing, and I've been using it since. $98 plus tax. So now, I've got about $400 invested in a $98 pressure washer.
Idiot, reporting, sir!
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Monday, October 14, 2013 7:22:08 PM UTC-4, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Another silly thing some people do is find that a store someplace is selling the same product for $5 less. Or the fast food place has a coupon there good for $5 off. So they drive 10 miles farther each way to get it. So they just used $3.50 in gas, plus other per mile expense attributable to a car. Then factor in the time and what have you really saved?
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On 10/14/2013 6:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

My roommate will drive 10 miles each way to save 10 cents a gallon on gas. I can't get through to him. o_O
TDD
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On Mon, 14 Oct 2013 20:50:22 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Might make sense if the tank is big enough and the vehicle gets good enough mileage.
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On 10/14/2013 10:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

He's the type who will only put a maximum of $20 at a time in the tank. ^_^
TDD
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