Houseful of interior trim to paint

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Let's say you've got a house full of natural wood trim (polyurethane), and you really want it semi-gloss white. Would you paint it, or just buy new preprimed trim? If you paint, do you degloss first, or just put on the primer and then paint over?
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I would paint vs replace trim, if trim is in good condition. Way less work. I use 409 or Fantastic to degrease the trim. Then apply alcohol based Zinnzer or Bullseye primer. Follow instructions on primer, to the letter. Then lightly sand, and finish coat. For a smooth finish, freer of brush strokes, and lasting quality, I like to use oil based (alkyd) top coat. Roger
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On Wed, 27 Jun 2007 23:38:15 -0700, Roger Taylor wrote:

What he said :)
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your better off sanding first espically if the poly is glossy
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YOU HAD BETTER BUY THE ALKYD PAINT NOW, IT HAS BEEN OUTLAWED AND WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE FOR THIS YEAR.
| > >> Let's say you've got a house full of natural wood trim (polyurethane), and | > >> you really want it semi-gloss white. Would you paint it, or just buy new | > >> preprimed trim? If you paint, do you degloss first, or just put on the | > >> primer and then paint over? | > | > > I would paint vs replace trim, if trim is in good condition. Way less | > > work. I use 409 or Fantastic to degrease the trim. Then apply alcohol | > > based Zinnzer or Bullseye primer. Follow instructions on primer, to the | > > letter. Then lightly sand, and finish coat. | > > For a smooth finish, freer of brush strokes, and lasting quality, I like | > > to use oil based (alkyd) top coat. | > > Roger | > | > What he said :) | | your better off sanding first espically if the poly is glossy |
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|| > >> Let's say you've got a house full of natural wood trim | (polyurethane), and || > >> you really want it semi-gloss white. Would you paint it, or just | buy new || > >> preprimed trim? If you paint, do you degloss first, or just put | on the || > >> primer and then paint over? || > || > > I would paint vs replace trim, if trim is in good condition. Way | less || > > work. I use 409 or Fantastic to degrease the trim. Then apply | alcohol || > > based Zinnzer or Bullseye primer. Follow instructions on primer, | to the || > > letter. Then lightly sand, and finish coat. || > > For a smooth finish, freer of brush strokes, and lasting quality, | I like || > > to use oil based (alkyd) top coat. || > > Roger || > || > What he said :) || || your better off sanding first espically if the poly is glossy || | |
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NO NEED TO SHOUT!
State your source for this "theory". I use alkyd all the time for interior trim.
JK
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On Sat, 30 Jun 2007 15:19:14 -0000, Big_Jake

[...]
What???!!!
Where???!!!
In all states? or which one(s)?
Citation, please?
Aspasia.
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Supply of Oil-Based Paint Thins as New Rule Takes Effect Sale Restrictions Aim to Curb Ozone Pollution
By Margaret Webb Pressler Washington Post Staff Writer Tuesday, May 24, 2005; A01
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/05/23/AR2005052301644_pf.html
Similar rules have been in effect for a while in California, and restrictive oil-paint laws are being crafted in many northern states. But the mid-Atlantic region has not made as much progress reducing overall pollution as New England has, so the paint restrictions kicked in first in this area. Since Jan. 1, stores in the District, Northern Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New York have not been able to order most of the oil-based paints commonly used in household and commercial applications.
<aspasia> wrote in message wrote: | >> YOU HAD BETTER BUY THE ALKYD PAINT NOW, | >> IT HAS BEEN OUTLAWED AND WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE FOR THIS YEAR. | >> | | [...] | | What???!!! | | Where???!!! | | In all states? or which one(s)? | | Citation, please? | | Aspasia. |
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Ok, where does it say that, nationwide, it won't be available anymore? This article is from 2005, and I bought some two weeks ago from Sherwin Williams.
Per the article, this is in a few northeastern states and California.
JK
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jeffc wrote:

Paint
Degloss first sand - OR - use TSP (trisodium phosphate)
--

dadiOH
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Yep. I'd not sand, I'd use TSP. Wipe down well. Prime (Bin), and paint.
Before I decided to use a redwood color stain after my remodel (gosh did I let myself in for a project!), I used Ben Moore's White Dove alkyd paint on all trim; it's a very good off-white for that. The alkyd does tend to yellow where there is no light (closets, inside of kitchen cabinets) so if I were to do it again I'd use the latex. Still very nice.
Banty
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Lightly sand the trim. Steel wool may be better if the trim has crevices. Wipe off dust with mineral spirits, prime, and paint. Follow the paint manufacturer's directions. A very light sanding between coats is a good idea. Use a repair/trouble light to inspect for drips, sags, etc. Use the best quality paint you can find. Trim painting takes patience.
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I was out buying baseboard earlier today. The cheapest was 99 cents per foot (pre-primed fiberboard). By the time you do a whole house, you're looking at hundreds of dollars. As others said, I would paint what I already have.
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Well, I hear what you're saying about the cost of new trim. But frankly sanding hundreds of feet of trim all throughout the house sounds like a major pain in the neck too, especially if it's before and after the first coat. I think I'm looking at at least 3 coats total, whereas with preprimed trim it would only be one coat on top (assuming white on white). Does TSP really work fine rather than sanding/deglossing? Or is it actually a deglossing agent? Thanks for the tips.
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You must be one heckuva great finish carpenter if you think it is less work to cut, trim, nail, putty, and possible caulk all that trim after you pull out all the old trim without damaging plaster or drywall.
JK
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wrote:

PLUS the preprimed stuff still needs sanding in my past experience, if you are going to do a good job, so you would be no further ahead.
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I'll trade you the trim in my house for the trim in your house. I'd love to have natural wood trim. It's on our Things to Do list, but pretty far down.
Frankly, any time I hear of someone painting wood, I think "Vandal! If you're going to paint it, it might as well be plastic."
Cindy Hamilton
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Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Depends on the wood...finger-jointed, paint-grade poplar would look pretty ugly other than painted...otoh, when I was in VA and restoring old houses there, most that had been converted to apartments for sometimes nearly 50 years, finding wide mahogany, walnut, clear pine raised panel wainscotting having been sawed through for new doorways and somesuch, "just" 20 layers of paint to strip was relatively minor desecration to be joyful over... :(
--
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I'll trade you the trim in my house for the trim in your house. I'd love to have natural wood trim. It's on our Things to Do list, but pretty far down.
Frankly, any time I hear of someone painting wood, I think "Vandal! If you're going to paint it, it might as well be plastic."
Cindy Hamilton
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