House wiring question.

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I'm wiring up some outlets in my garage. I have a receptacle, wire going in the box, wire coming out and going to the next box. The receptacle is a standard receptacls, and has two screws for the neutral wire, two screws for the hot wire, but only one screw for the ground wire. I hook the hot and neutral wires to the respective screws, works fine.What is the correct way to wire up the ground wire? Can I put both of them on the same screw? It seems to be secure, but it is it the correct way to do this?
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I usually wrap the two grounds together and then attach one of the ground wires to the screw, cutting the other one a little shorter.
(I am NOT an electrician)
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I don't trust just wrapping two grounds together.
If it's "new work" I use one of those wirenuts with a hole in the end and leave the longer of the two ground wires uncut. Slip the wirenut over the long wire and slide it down to where the second ground can be laid alongside. Twist both wires together. If the ground wires have already been but short, you just add a third through the hole.
I picked up some "pigtail" wirenuts (12 each in white, black, red, and green) and they are useful when you have only a single device.

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Twisting the grounds together is perfectly acceptable and works fine.
--
Steve Barker




"John Gilmer" < snipped-for-privacy@crosslink.net> wrote in message
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On 23 Dec 2006 18:08:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

IMHO:
If you toss on a "greenie" on what you did, it would sound ok. "Greenies" are green wire nuts with a hole in it to allow a single wire to pass through.
later,
tom @ www.MedJobSite.com
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Ook wrote:

Take a look at the diagram at:
http://img.timeinc.net/toh/images/electrical/el199901_outlets01t.jpg
In other words, connect the ground wire with a pig tail to the screw on top of the outlet. I wouldn't use the same screw. Home Depot, actually has some pre-made pig tails, but using those only make sense if you are going to do a lot of them.
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This is how I ended up doing it. I wasn't sure if code allowed two wires to be attached to one screw or not, so I redid it like the picture shows.
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Depending on who you ask the important thing is secure a good continuous mechanical connection through the circuit. Being in the garage check to see because some codes require a GFCI circuit in the garage area. You can wrap take a bare copper (ground) wire and run to the ground connection, of the outlet, then secure it to the remaining wire runs with a lug nut or most just pull enough wire out of the outlet and loop the connections or cut it and make your splices there. The important thing, again, is maintaining the integrity of the ground through your outlets. Make sure that your HOT (Black) wire goes into the proper position on the receptacle and maintain that throughout each outlet or you risk electrocution. Each outlet has a HOT side and a Neutral side but sounds like you already have that down.
On 12/23/06 8:50 PM, in article XemdnRt64tj9QRDYnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com, "Ook" <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote:

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I have the hot/neutral stuff down :). I've probably forgotten more about electricity then most electricians will ever know. However, having said that, I know squat about building codes. I decided to run a short wire from the ground screw of the receptacle and use a wirenut to bind that to the two ground wires running through the box. I gather that doing it that way meets code, and it will probably work almost as well though I'll be the first to admit I don't like using wire nuts, even if it is the time honored way to wire houses. I've seen too many get hot because the connection wasn't as good as it should/could have been.
----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: alt.home.repair Sent: Saturday, December 23, 2006 6:23 PM Subject: Re: House wiring question.

"Ook" <Ook Don't send me

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"Ook" <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote in message "Ook" <Ook Don't send me

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John Grabowski wrote:

Ye Gads! I guess you learn something every day. I'm not an electrician and I've always just worked on my own house, but I've never twisted the wires first. However, I have always made sure that the wires are securely fastened in the connector. The good news is that 20-years later, I haven't had any problems. The bad news is that you've given me yet another thing to worry about, but thanks anyway.
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On 23 Dec 2006 20:58:50 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I would suggest you read the box before you believe this. All major brands say twisting is NOT necessary.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have a DIY home wiring book that says all you need to do is push the wires in the nut and twist. But, I prefer to twist the wires before putting the nut on. The nut seems to grab better and I know if the nut were to somehow come off that I would still have a good solid connection. Plus I find the wires are easier to work with when they're twisted. Just a personal preference of mine.
-Felder
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On Sun, 24 Dec 2006 01:12:15 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Because it is not necessary does not mean it is not better.
Twisting them is better.
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wrote:

For some reason, people usually leave that bit out. They seem to consider "you don't have to" to mean "DON'T". Mark Lloyd http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
"The government of the United States is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion." -- George Washington
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It actually would have been more important to pigtail the hots and neutrals. Putting one on each screw creates a situation where if one connection goes bad, then you lose all your downstream current.
--
Steve Barker

"Ook" <Ook Don\'t send me any freakin\' spam at zootal dot com delete the
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Steve Barker LT wrote:

Which is a nuisance, but easily diagnosed and fixed. Losing your safety ground is a potentially serious problem.
Chris
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Steve Barker LT wrote:

I think the regulations restrict the number of "devices" in a box, but I don't know if wire nuts are considered to be a "device".
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On 27 Dec 2006 10:39:16 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You are talking about number of conductors. No? Wire nuts don't count. It is based on the volume of the box.
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