House wiring problem

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On 4/5/2010 7:05 PM aemeijers spake thus:

Well, since we're talking near-electrocutions here, the last shock I got (couple years ago) was 277 volts. (Had never heard of that voltage before working on a friend's shop with commercial lighting.) I contacted hot & neutral with one hand while standing on a stepladder. Zazzed me up good, but didn't throw me off the ladder. Worst shock I've ever gotten.
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On 4/5/2010 1:57 AM Evan spake thus:

I'm not an engineer. That was just an ASS-umption on the part of Stormy in one of his malformed posts.
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Dave wrote:

What can you use for shaving, cleaning you clothes and sleeping in?
The secret, IMHO, is to know the limitations of what you are using.
For a meter I would use my digital Fluke (which is category-rated). If I saw odd low voltages I would check with a light bulb in a pigtail socket. Fluke has meters that can be switched between high impedance and lower impedance. You can get a good idea if a ground is good with the pigtail light bulb. I most often use a neon test light. A 3-lite tester gives some fast information. A "non-contact" voltage tester is real nice sometimes. Check what Ralph wrote. Depends on what you want to find out.
What can you use for shaving, cleaning you clothes and sleeping in? A razor, a brush and pajamas
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An electrician has got to know his limitations.
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Dave wrote:

Two things are happening here. #1. You are using a digital meter, a no no on AC house diagnosis. #2. Your outlet is not grounded.
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Okay, you are correct on both counts. The outlet is not grounded, and I was using my Fluke, which I trust more than the off-brand. Would an analog meter give me a different reading from hot-gnd, or neutral-gnd? Hadn't thought about it, but it probably would, wouldn't it? Have to check that out. *Thank you*
Dave
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On 04/04/2010 05:56 PM, Dave wrote:

yes, if you want to have the "best" meters, you'll have both a digital Fluke and a Simpson 260. both are appropriate for different projects, although either one will work in a pinch.
nate
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In

And my old Simpson 260 was easier to read from a couple feet away, too. The mirror made measurement errors due to parallax almost never happen.
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If I remember right this is the thread that has "phantom voltage" and at least one person suggested a resistor between the meter leads.
I just got a Fluke toy catalog, and they have a module that plugs into the meter with the leads plugging into it that does just that: Fluke SV225 stray voltage adapter www.fluke.com/stray-voltage It maintains the Category rating of the meter - which should be of interest to anyone who is employed (under OSHA) that makes measurements on power circuits.
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