House shifting off foundation

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ransley wrote:

I'll agree w/ the last. Heavy come-alongs are indeed an option other than they pull instead of push which unless there's a better attachment than the cable around the corners isn't a primo choice imo...
Having moved a lot of stuff w/ tractors, I'll attest one can be pretty doggone delicate if have the right stuff -- that means either the hydrostatic tranny and/or hydraulics, not a fixed-speed manual transmission on a chain. I'd have no hesitation whatsoever in being certain I could nudge it along a fraction of an inch at a time w/ my bucket.
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dpb wrote:

One key feature of the manual come-a-longs or high lift jacks used in that capacity is the feedback they give as to the load on them, something you do not get with powered hydraulics. Yes, with my backhoe I could lift and position materials very slowly and to a fraction of an inch, but there was no difference whether I was lifting a 1,000# log or a 200# generator. Particularly when pulling from multiple points that load feedback is very helpful in telling where things are moving freely and where they are stuck.
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Pete C. wrote: ...

See my other response on my preferred suggested technique... :)
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dpb wrote:

Yes, but hydraulic jacks, even being manual, don't give you very good feedback as to the force applied do to their very high ratio. The come-a-longs and high lift jacks are lower ratio and provide better feedback.
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Pete C. wrote:

But it's a lot harder to get them to push... :)
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dpb wrote:

A high lift jack does both. Real handy gadget. I used a high lift jack, a couple chains, shackles, slings and a half dozen logs to move a 40' container (near 10k#) over rough terrain about 60' and then level it onto stacked solid concrete blocks by myself :) It didn't hurt that it was a heavily wooded area so I had anchors anywhere I wanted.
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snipped-for-privacy@noemail.com wrote: ...

Actually, I let you sidetrack me somewhat... :)
Take those bottle jacks and set them on side and use the tractor or something else solid and push against a paul...w/ only a few inches to go, it'll be a piece of cake and no danger at all of too far...
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snipped-for-privacy@noemail.com wrote:

Could you get angle iron to go to the roof from the base? I think that you are right to pull from the base but guess that the angle iron needs to be on the two stongest parts and not the intermediate. There's a serious risk of crushing it.

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snipped-for-privacy@noemail.com wrote:

I think you'd be better off with come-alongs, a winch, or chain fall. It will be hard to get the accuracy you need with tractors.
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Hello? That was last week. I would hope they have it bolted down and are drinking beer by now.
s

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How do you build a house without inspections... He did say 3 years ago right..? 2004 not 1904..? Or is the house in malaysia..?
I would think if you're smart and patient enough to build a house, you would not leave out the obvious step of fastening it to the foundation..?
3 inches is a long way to move.. I still say this couldn' t happen without at least one wall moving a different distance than the other 3... The op wants you to believe all 4 walls moved the same distance..??
Impossible..didn't happen.. I would imagine during construction, you'd notice you're not tied down when you start loading up those walls and tying them together etc...
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there are plenty of places in this here US of A that don't have government intervention in building.
steve

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How do you build a house without inspections... He did say 3 years ago right..? 2004 not 1904..? Or is the house in malaysia..?
I would think if you're smart and patient enough to build a house, you would not leave out the obvious step of fastening it to the foundation..?
3 inches is a long way to move.. I still say this couldn' t happen without at least one wall moving a different distance than the other 3... The op wants you to believe all 4 walls moved the same distance..??
Impossible..didn't happen.. I would imagine during construction, you'd notice you're not tied down when you start loading up those walls and tying them together etc...
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houses. The walls don't sit on the sill plate, the floor system does. It is a relatively strong box section, with lots of T joints and the floor decking (and X-braces between joists) to keep it square. The framing subcontractor, like in a subdivision, bids the work as a package. Once the foundation inspection is signed off, they want to get in and out fast. By the time they finish laying down the sill plates, the other guys on crew are already laying out the joists and rim joists, and starting the decking. There is a very short window to apply the washers and nuts and torque them down, from above. Task is often assigned to the kid on the crew, and is regarded as scut work. If kid is lazy, or the real carpenter that is supposed to be watching him is lazy, the bolt-down get skipped. It is a pain to do it from below after floor gets decked, and a pain for the inspector to look on later visits, so it often falls through the cracks. Floor system is still solid without it, and nothing will move around unless there is a high wind, so nothing will raise a red flag after the the floor is decked. The J-bolts mudded into foundation are usually only an inch at most above the top of the sill plate, so house has to rise 2.5 to 3 inches before it can shift sideways. 999 houses out of 1000, the wind (or floodwater) will never get that bad. I have seen 40 year old houses with the washers and nuts missing, that never moved at all.
Yes, it would be unusual for house to move and stay perfectly square- it usually gets twisted. But on a small well-framed house, it may be stiff enough to look intact and square. So I do find OP's story plausible. I bet the doors and windows all stick now, though.
aem sends...
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snipped-for-privacy@noemail.com wrote:

I don't know the solution which seems to belong to epxperts. But I wonder how building moves without basement moving?
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wrote:

upward lift on one side from wind and/or water, it'll move all right. I've seen it first-hand, cleaning up after a tornado in a cheap-ass subdivision. More or less intact house picked up, rotated slightly, and set back down about a foot off the foundation walls. Saw the same thing in Louisiana post-Katrina/Retah, from storm surge. Consider the relative masses involved. Water is, IIRC, about 65 pounds a cubic foot. If that water is moving several miles per hour, that is a lot of inertia to dissipate as it slams into the house. Like a giant hand that won't stop pushing.
Like a previous poster said, with a block basement, it usually caves in the wall on upstream side. A poured-wall basement with enough rebar, if there is a way for the water to go around, will do better. In some situations, if ground gets super-saturated and basement hasn't filled to equalize the pressure, it can pop out of ground like a swimming pool, septic tank, or grave vault. Literally floats to the top. For something as big as a house, that would take some scary-extreme conditions.
aem sends....
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Be a sight though, don't ya think?
s
can pop out of ground like a swimming pool, septic tank, or

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Steve Barker LT wrote:

I've seen some old film from a 1955 I think it was flood in NW CT which shows three story brick buildings floating down main street. Doesn't get much more impressive than that.
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