House for sale, not enough drywall screws, what to do?

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*Are you absolutely sure that it is only the drywall sagging? I did several jobs for one customer over a two year period who had a sagging spot in her dining room ceiling. Everyone thought the drywall had warped from a drip that she had a few years before in that ceiling. It turned out that the trusses in that area had started to separate from the gusset plates holding them together. The trusses were sagging and bringing the drywall down. The water from the drip weakened the areas that the gussets were nailed into.
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If you imagined fastening the ceiling drywall, running perpendicular to the joists, with three fasteners per joist, one at each tapered edge and one fastener in the middle and then imagine what the drywall would look like in 35 years, that is what you would see. Its scarey bad and it is a wonder it has not fallen. You see the same pattern in all the ceilings in the entire house. If I get back in the house (might have scared him with my estimate) I will take some photos.
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On Tuesday, April 2, 2013 1:18:51 PM UTC-4, andyeverett wrote:

The drywall is sagging BETWEEN the joists/rafters/trusses.
The problem is the drywall contractor cheaped out and used 1/2" drywall when they should have used 5/8".
You can drive screws until you're blue in the face and it won't help because the sag is in the open spaces where there is nothing to screw to.
At this point the drywall has taken a "set" so even if you could screw it, it would just crack and crumble.
The right way to fix it is to pull it all down and start over with the right thickness drywall, meant for ceilings.
Or, you could install a drop ceiling to hide the poor drywalling job.
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On Apr 3, 10:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Nonsense. The vast majority of drywall in homes is 1/2". It depends on the joist spacing. If it's 16" OC which is common, then 1/2" is fine.

Maybe, if it's on greater than 16" spacing. Or it could be that they didn't screw it correctly. Who knows what he has without someone actually looking.

That could very well be the case.

I sure would explore other options FIRST.

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On Wed, 3 Apr 2013 07:34:50 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Aside from several replies of it could be 1/2" instead of 5/8", a common building practice (which, I despise) is to screw/nail the edges & cheat the field of screws/nails because the hangers used adhesive on the truss chords. This makes it easier for the finishers also. The hangers don't always put enough PL on the studs. Don't shoot the messenger, just saying.
Someone mentioned about texturing. I think I may be tempted to go this route, but putting more screws in the field. You'd have to look up the appropriate number, but it's somewhere around every 8" on butt joints, and I believe every 12" in the field.
I had this problem in my own home, especially on the walls.
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Probably dampness as it will make it sag. Guessing. Popcorn the ceilings for a cheap way out. Here in MA going back maybe 5 years ago we now have screw inspectors here. Have to wait for them before you can finish tape or skim coat.
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On Tue, 2 Apr 2013 10:18:51 -0700 (PDT), andyeverett

Have a friend hold an 8 foot long 2x6 to the ceiling, take a small floor jack and a 2x4 that extends from the jack to the board on the ceiling, and jack the drywall tight. Apply lots of screws.
Remove jack and boards, and do the same on the next sheet.
When they are all done, apply drywall compound to the screw heads and any joints that need repair. Sand, reapply compound, sand and paint.
Job done!!!!
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On 4/2/2013 11:18 AM, andyeverett wrote:

I just had a thought, paint the ceiling with an ocean scene using the sagging areas as waves. ^_^
Sorry, couldn't help it.
TDD
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