House air Filter

I have a Triton Big Bear air filter on my heating system. I just installed a new programable thermostat that monitors the number of hours on the air filter. The most information I can find is to change the filter at the beginning of each season. My question is. Can anyone tell me what the recommended change is in hours so that I can make use of this feature on the Thermostat?
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Every house is different, in some it might last a year in some 3 months, change it when its dirty.
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On Thu, 06 Dec 2007 05:31:07 -0800, Dick wrote:

Every three months or 2,160 hours. 24x30x3!60
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That doesn't make any sense. Change it when it is dirty.
Steve
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On Thu, 06 Dec 2007 10:17:54 -0700, SteveB wrote:

The poster asked for the "recommended" time to program into his thermostat. Tell me how you program "change it when it's dirty" into a thermostat?
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Looking at a filter is easier than programming a thermostat and looking at it hundreds of times. What if the thermostat malfunctions. Does the OP wait three years and exclaim, "The thermostat didn't SAY it was dirty."
Just look at the stupid filter.
Steve
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On Thu, 06 Dec 2007 10:56:38 -0700, SteveB wrote:

That's all fine and dandy and pretty common knowledge. But to give the poster an answer to his question what do YOU recommend in hours he should program his thermostat for?
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For the OP -
It's Trion Air Bear, not Big Bear.
Per a Google search, you should be getting 6-12 months (one site) or 10-12 months (FiltersUSA) out of the filter. I don't know where you live, but my furnace doesn't run anywhere near 25% of the time each year, so setting the hours to 2160 seems a little too high. I change my Air Bear about once a year, but have gone 18 months without it looking too bad.
Of course, every situation is different, so you might want to try a setting, and monitor the filter to see how it looks when the t-stat is telling you to change it. Having lots of pets, or running the fan more often than "normal" will have affect the change interval.
JK
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Meat Plow wrote:

Why do you need a program for the thermostat to tell you when the filter needs cleaned or changed? Just take yourself to the furnace, remove it and look at it. If it's dirty, clean or change it. In most cases, once a month is enough to check and probably clean or change the filter. What's so difficult about that?
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On Thu, 06 Dec 2007 22:29:08 +0000, do_see wrote:

I don't need shit dude, I was trying to answer the original poster's question.
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You realy cant put an hour or date on replacing them, If you have pets, keep windows open and dont clean often it wont last long, maybe 3 months, and I have seen them nearly clean after 1 year.
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On Thu, 06 Dec 2007 09:21:02 -0800, ransley wrote:

Sure you can put a "recommended" time on filters. Take a look at most any filter and it's printed on the filter or wrapper. The original poster asked for a "recommended" time for change and that's what I posted.
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EXACTLY. Some seasons when it's nice weather, one hardly turns on the HVAC. Like you say, different people have different environments. Pet dander. Dust. Lots of things. It is absolutely impossible to give any rule for changing them EXCEPT change it when it's dirty.
It's like asking about how the weather will be tomorrow. It all depends on where you live, don't it? It's not all the same.
Steve
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wrote

The thermostat "monitors the number of hours on the air filter".
What part of that don't you understand?
Bob
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wrote:

How can a thermostat determine when a filter is dirty? I clean my furnace filters (2 of them) once a month. You can put a reminder in Outlook or other "calendar" software, then dismiss the reminder when the cleaning is completed. I've done it that way for over 10 years. The filter on the first floor gets much dirtier than the one on the 2nd floor. I have always heard to clean/replace monthly, and that's what my neighbors do as well.
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Filters like that Trion actually filter better as they get dirty because the accumulated soil reduces the size of the pores in the filter media. You are better off not changing it too often. Also, the big pleated filters are quite expensive. The best way to determine when it needs to be changed is to check the pressure drop across the filter, and you can get devices to do this. One simple one is just a whistle that starts making noise when the pressure drop across the filter rises. On the other hand, if you don't change when it is truly dirty, your airflow will be restricted too much and the furnace overtemp sensor may shut the furnace down.
I'd set the thermostat timer to work out to about a month in prime heating or cooling season and use its alarm as a reminder to *check* the filter. If the pleats are uniformly gray and there is a noticeable layer of dirt, then change it. Otherwise, reset the alarm and check a month later when it goes off again.
My $0.02
Paul F.
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Paul Franklin wrote:

Sounds like some kind of special filter system. I've googled and can't find any info on this particular one. Can you give a description of how this works and how it is different from a normal slab filter?
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On Fri, 07 Dec 2007 03:43:09 GMT, do snipped-for-privacy@do.com wrote:
<snip>

http://www.fedders.com/catalog/residential/airbear.htm
or google "trion air bear filter"
Honeywell makes a similar media type filter. They are designed to compete with electrostatic air cleaners without generating ozone. They are also cheaper to purchase and install initially than electrostatics, but media replacement costs over time are much higher, since electrostatics are just cleaned in the dishwasher.
The media cartridge is about 6 inches thick, with accordion bellows shaped media with thick folds. This gives it a lot of surface area so the pores in the media can be made smaller to filter better without restricting the air flow too much.
Paul F.
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wrote:

Maybe set it for 400 hrs then see how it looks
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Paul Franklin wrote:

Well now. That's a horse of a different color.
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