Hot Water Tank


I heard the hot water tank life span is about 16 years is that true
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Can someone tell me if you can move a hot water tank into a loft. The loft has had no conversion it is as built. Are there any regs I should no about. If I can suggestions on the best way would be helpfull
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shushin


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shushin wrote:

Regulations are local. You will need to contract your local authorities.
Mechanically, there should not be a problem, but that would depend on a lot of variables so that question is best answered by a local plumber who can likely work out any possible problems.
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Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Out of sight, out of mind.
Noting Mr. Meehan's caution to check local regulations and specific plumbing layout, we had a water heater in the attic of a rental unit for a number of years.
One of the copper elbows developed a pinhole leak which sprayed a fine mist of water into the attic until the ceiling came down.
TB
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shushin wrote:

Have a structural engineer determine whether the size tank you are considering can be safely supported by the loft floor.
Water weighs 8.34 pounds per gallon and the tank adds more weight.
If you do move it up there, I'd strongly suggest you put an "overflow pan" under it with a drain from that pan leading somewhere where the eventual tank leakage can safely be discharged.
HTH,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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gas or electric? its also very regional.
around here 8 years is doing well.
16 wouldnt happen.
they are realtively cheap dependable appliances.
say 500 bucks installed, last 10 years 50 bucks a year less than one nice candy bar weekly.
all new tanks are much more energy efficent, so buying new is a good $ saver
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Not sure of the exact age, but I replaced my electric one around 20 years ago. It is still going. That reminds me, it is long overdue to be drained and cleaned.
Harry K
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People here say that if you don't do that frequently, when you do do it, the crud will clog the valve and you'll never get it closed again. I have no idea.

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No.
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Figure I always hear is 12 years. But it depends on water quality, construction, maintenance, use, and dumb luck. Normal is 5 years to 25 years. I have one that is 24 years old. Works fine, but I am going to replace because it is full of crud. Well, some day.
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Mine is 22 years old (electric) and still operating fine; I've replaced one thermostat and one element in that time.
A neighbor whose WH was the same make and age did a 'precautionary' replacement last year. I had the plumber hacksaw open his old one and it still looked OK inside, so I'm letting mine go until something happens. It is installed in the garage, has an overflow pan and I always turn off the water if I'm going out of town so I figure the risk of damage from a leak is pretty small.
YMMV.
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Also, there is a big difference in typical lifespan for an electric vs gas. Electric, due to the way it's heated, lasts a lot longer, so 20+ years is not unusual for an electric. Somewhere around 13 I'd say is more typical of gas. But it varies widely, much of it do to what's in the water. Experience from some neighbors can be one rough guide.
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On May 3, 6:56�pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

with a gas tank thermal shock if its emptied completely, that is all hot water replaced with cold can lead to earlier tank failure.
expansion and contraction stresses the glass liner
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

someone posted this link earlier
http://waterheaterrescue.com /
yes it is a commercial page but it seems to have some good common sense advice in there. highlights:
1) check your anode. Replacing an anode that still has metal left but is nearing the end of its service life can help prolong the life of a water heater by keeping the tank from corroding.
2) regular flushing does help prevent sediment buildup. I'd do it every year, personally.
3) the stock drain valves do suck. I picked up the parts to duplicate their ball valve setup at my local big box store for about $15. Just trying to work up the gumption to try to get the old plastic ones out of the two tanks downstairs.
I would add, do NOT use insulation around a water heater no matter how tempting. I have two tanks in my basement, both about 25 years old. The gas one looks fine. The solar one had an extra wrap of insulation around it, and apparently that allowed condensation to form. It needs to be replaced, because it looks like it's about to collapse at any minute. (this weekend's project, assuming I can get out of working over the weekend, is to replumb this tank so that when it fails I can throw a few valves and bypass it until I can replace it.)
In your particular case I would simply shut the water off, try to pull the anode, and see what there is to see. If it isn't completely eaten away and the outside of the tank looks good, I would merely replace the anode and consider it good for another 5-6 years or so. If it is all the way down to the wire, then it's iffy - you don't know how long it's been operating essentially without corrosion protection.
nate
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be prepared to replace the old tank instantly the anode may not come lose easily or tank may leak on reinstallation.
disturbing a old tank is usually a bad idea.
plus tyhe drain valve may fail..... espically those plastic ones.
metal ones dont allow full flow of debris, then the debris stick at the washer and the valve leaks.......
start your do good job in the early morning after pricing new tanks and be prepared for anything.
you are kicking the hornets nest then saying HI sticking your nose in the door..............
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I agree however I have no choice in the matter in my situation. I know the solar tank is a lost cause, I will try to fix up the gas one but with an eye toward replacing it if everything goes pear shaped. I can't flush it at all now as the handle stripped on the old drain valve so I have nothing to lose at this point. If I can't get the anode out, or if I can't get the drain valve out, I will replace it. I won't touch that one until I have the $$ ready.
I am going to plumb in a bypass to the solar one next chance I get and "run it til it dies." When it pukes (not if, but when) I will just throw the bypass valves and drain it.
nate
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That's about right, maybe 10 to 20 years. They can last longer if... Temperature is kept lower. Tank is flushed periodically. Water is naturally soft.
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