Hot water recirculator

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I'm contemplating getting a residential hot water recirculating system. Two models available are the the Chili Pepper (http://www.chilipepperapp.com ) and the Laing Autocirc (http://www.autocirc.com ). Both operate on the same principle. The pump goes between the hot and cold lines at the fixture farthest from the water heater. Water is pumped from the hot side back through the cold side until hot water arrives at the faucet.
What experiences, good or bad, has anyone had with such devices?
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I heard they were red hot.....
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Bob wrote:

They work, but they don't pay for themselves in water savings. The cost of energy to run the pump and continually keep the circulating water hot exceeds the cost of the municipal water saved virtually everywhere in the U.S.
So if you want the convenience, go ahead. Butr you aren't saving the planet or anything.
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Travis Jordan wrote:

Correct, also the plumbing loop will be heated to a constant temperature which is then radiated off. That is a waste of energy. It is a convenience but as you said cetainly doesn't fit into the "save the planet" category.
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wrote:

The plumbing loop is only heated for the times that you have set on the timer. Ours runs 6:00 A.M. to 10:00 A.M. for showers, washing, etc., and again at 9:00 P.M. to 11:00 P.M. primarily for the dishwasher. The big saving for us is a reduction of the load on the septic system. When the leach field gets saturated, it costs us $500 to get it pumped out. Happened twice last year. That's when we put in the recirculator and 1.6 gal. toilets. Cut our normal (no irrigation) water consumption from 6,000 gallons per month to 2,500 gallons. That keeps 3,500 gallons out of the septic system.
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On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 08:04:55 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

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wrote:

This is true...the savings don't come from the water reduction. The savings come from utilizing proper timer settings, optimized delivery to your specific desired temperature. If the hot water is delivered at YOUR DESIRED temperature...there will be no waiting and LESS cold city water will enter your water heater.
Efficient use is operating a recirculator 'only' during known hot water usage times.
Operating a recirculator continously is better known as a circulation system not a re-circulation system.
The cost

I dare to disagree with the above last sentence because saving water puts less of a demand on the nations water delivery infrastructure beginning with savings at the main water supply source (less demand=less water to deliver=less pumping =less power) and ending with waste water treatment plants (reduced processing / chemicals)
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Unless I'm missing something, it looks like your cold water line would have to go directly back to your water heater. If there were any Ts in the cold water line, someone opening a cold water faucet anywhere else in the house could get hot water.

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someone opening a cold water faucet anywhere else in the house

The above can only occur from a hot water recirculator which is malfunctioning as it suppose to stop pumping once hot water has arrived at the hot water recirculation pump.

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I have the chili pepper, I bought it because it takes 40 seconds for hot water to get to my bathroom. I soften my water so I got tired of seeing all that water going down the drain that I had once heated and softened. The only complaint I have is it is loud so if you have a house full of light sleepers or one person gets up much earlier than the other the one in bed is not going to be happy with it. The other consideration is if you have a septic system your putting a lot of water in there that wouldn't need to go there if you use one of these on demand type recirculating pumps. The chili pepper comes with a small door bell button that I mounted to the right of my sink under the lip so you can't see it unless your in the tub.
Good luck, Rich
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Sounds like a freaking waste of money to me. I wuold think that you would have more important things to worry about then how many seconds it takes to get hot water. If you are in that much fo a hurry that you can't wait, then try an on demand water heater under the sink.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sounds to me like you wouldn't know much about this problem, cause you've never owned a home large enough to have the problem.
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After the pump has run to supply "instant" hot water at your sink, the cold faucet at that sink would then run hot water until the water line was emptied of the hot water in the loop.
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wrote:

This can occur when a recirculator's temperature sensor is cheap or is placed in an inefficient manner. Some recirculators have clamp-on temperature sensors. They are clamped on to the outside of the pipe to measure temperature. This is very inefficient and requires the pipe to also be heated before the temperature sensor measures it.
Additionally, if a recirculators pump moves water too quickly, it may result in too much hot water being placed into the cold water line before the system has time to react. Most cases of homeowners who've complained that they now have lost their cold water are a result of a recirculator NOT having two-way checkvalve crossover engineering.
When the hot water faucet is opened, it causes the hot water lines pressure to drop quickly, without a checkvalve in place, the cold water line could bleed over cold water into the hot water line and out the faucet tap. Thereby, reducing the heated waters temperature.. Engineers realized this and most have corrected this from happening. On the other hand, if the cold line faucet is opened then the hot water lines pressure can bleed into the cold line. This is where most bleedover occurs causing the loss of cold water comfort in the home.
RedyTemp uses two way bleedover prevention. Utilizing a solenoid valve which only opens when recirculator pump operates. Additionally, we utilize a stainless steel 3" scientific temperature probe which is placed strategically at the hot water entry point into the manifold so that it runs over the probe as it enters the manifold. Resulting in highly efficient temperature sensing / management.
Most would agree that the KEY to real savings is to reduce the amount of very cold city water that enters into a homes water heater, because it demands the highest amount of therms to heat that water. A properly tuned / optimized recirculation system that delivers hot water at a temperature most near the home owners desired temperature will have the greatest reduction in TIME SPENT WAITING for hot water....during this TIME SPENT WAITING is when the city is filling your water heater with the COLDEST most expensive to heat water into your water heater.
Either reduce the time you spend waiting for hot water...or reduce the amount of hot water you use. That's were the savings can come from.
RedyTemp let's the home owner OPTIMIZE their hot water system by adjusting the temperature and delivery/readiness that best fits their lifestyle. If you get more then 2 seconds of warmish water from the faucet where the RedyTemp is installed, simply turn the temperature down just a hair.
OPTIMIZE the temperature setting OPTIMIZE the schedule / delivery / readiness results in optimized comfort AND savings.
most common response on our registration cards are;
Now that they've tried it...they can't live without it.
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wrote:

An efficient / optimized hot water recirculator would have stopped pumping before hot water entered the cold water line portion of the loop.
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Take a look at the Grundfos recirculation instant hot water system, the pump is mounted on the hot water heater and a bypass valve goes under the sink to the faucet with no return line needed. We had a big problem waiting for hot water at our kitchen sink and it solved our problem. I bought mine from Circulator Pump Store in NJ. they always have them listed on E-bay under instant hot water for about $175.00. Not too hard to install. Every thing is silent as compared to Rich's description of his.
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Is the pump on a timer? If so, how long does it stay on and how long does it stay off?

pump
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Circulator
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It has a timer you set for what ever you want, In our case we have it set to come on at 6AM and off at 6PM

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Does it run for 12 hours straight, or does it cycle on and off during those 12 hours?

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wouldn't
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hot
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It runs continous from one point to the next, whatever you set it at

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