Hot water recirculating pump

Has anyone on the group had any experiences with these pumps?
http://www.lowes.com/pd_77814-18701-500899_0__?Ntt=hot+water+recirculating+pump+with+timer&UserSearch=hot+water+recirculating+pump+with+timer&productId135231&rpp2
SWMBO complains about the time required to get hot water in the kitchen. The hot water tank is upstairs (!!) in a closet, and the kitchen is as far away from it as you can get. Bathrooms are OK, but not the kitchen.
Any comments?
I need to run electrical (old work box) and connect this beast.
73 /paul W3FIS
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I have a Laing Autocirc pump which does similar function. It works fine for exactly what you are describing. I insulated all my pipes in the loop so that it would loose minimum heat during the circulating process. We like it a lot.
R
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the thermostatically controlled valve under the sink, was that the cold water was now warm. I solved that problem when the damned valve started leaking, by running a separate return line back to the water heater, which bypassed the cold water line. This was possible because all my lines were in the basement.
R
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This is the biggest drawback. Without a seperate return line, which makes the install much more difficult, you wind up putting tepid water back into the cold line. Then, any faucet that draws from that line, is going to be getting tepid water from the hot water tank, instead of fresh cold water. Not what I would want for any place that I could be drinking it, using it for cooking, etc. And remember, it's not just the spot where the pump is installed. It's anything else on the cold water line going back to the hot water tank.
Other than that, for spots where it takes too long to get hot water, I think they are a great idea. Too bad builders are too cheap to plumb one in the right way from the start.
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On 5/11/2013 11:57, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_77814-18701-500899_0__?Ntt=hot+water+recirculating+pump+with+timer&UserSearch=hot+water+recirculating+pump+with+timer&productId135231&rpp2

hot water tank is upstairs (!!) in a closet, and the kitchen is as far away from it as you can get. Bathrooms are OK, but not the kitchen. I have had one of these pumps for several years and have found that it works well if you use hot water on a predictable schedule (e.g. for a morning shower) and set the timer appropriately. The pump installs on the water heater and the sensor valve goes on the faraway faucet where you want hot water. The sensor valve closes when the water gets hot and does not open again until the water at the valve cools off. That gives time for the water in the line to lose heat. So you may get some warm water followed by cold and then hot unless you open the faucet before the sensor valve closes. Also during that time no cold water will be immediately available because the hot water backflows over the cold line.
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On Sat, 11 May 2013 11:57:02 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

hot water tank is upstairs (!!) in a closet, and the kitchen is as far away from it as you can get. Bathrooms are OK, but not the kitchen.

I tried setting this kind of system up once (different brand pump) and it never worked very well and I took it off. Instead I just installed a 2 gallon conventional hot water heater under the kitchen sink (plugged into the same outlet under there as the Dishwasher). They seem to last about 5 years.
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On May 11, 7:57 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

away from it as you can get. Bathrooms are OK, but not the kitchen.

The reason for this is the bad design/layout of your house. You can install a hot water recirculating pump and the additional pipework and it will fix the problem but only with vastly increased fuel bill. If you do not run it continuously, you risk the chance of all manner of nasty bugs breeding in the return pipework.
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r away from it as you can get. Bathrooms are OK, but not the kitchen.

Vastly increased? Are you sure about that? Used with a timer so that it's active during periods when you're likely going to be there to use it, I'll bet it's actually so small that you won't even notice it.

Then you should have reports of people getting sick from this. Bet you can't come up with a single one.....
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wrote:

far away from it as you can get. Bathrooms are OK, but not the kitchen.

Commonest is legionella.
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s far away from it as you can get. Bathrooms are OK, but not the kitchen.

So show us one case where this happened in a hot water recirculating pump like that being discussed.
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Well it was a foolish idea. http://www.hse.gov.uk/healthservices/legionella.htm http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2155648/Legionnaires-disease-outbre ak-2012-Is-penny-pinching-building-putting-risk.html
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All the pumps for that purpose that I've seen include a temp sensor that it shuts the pump off once hot water arrives at the pump. You'd have to be nuts to buy one that didn't have it.
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wrote:

Don't talk such drivel.
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