Hot water heater stand

Since my previous owner decided to perch the hot water heater on this unsafe contraption involving 3 on end cinder blocks (of different manufacture and style I might add) holding up a circular concrete pad (paving block probably). It does not look safe at all, nor do I want to keep it. I think it meets code though, since the water heater is nominally 18" off the floor of the garage.
I looked around the web some and didn't really find any good examples of what people put their gas heaters on to keep them 18" off the floor. Taking a leaf from my engineering days (oh boy!) I decided that placing it on 2 cinderblock stacks should suffice - a ciderblock is 8x8x16 and that should give me 16" + the concrete pad which is about 2", plus the water heater itself has a 2" air intake foot under the pilot light. So I'm looking at 2 rows of 3 cinderblocks stacked on each other (12 total cinderblocks) plus the pad as my water heater stand.
What's normally done here. I was fully expecting to find a pretty standard water heater stand - but I'm not pulling anything up.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Use scrap 2x4s to build a sturdy box.
The water heater weighs, oh, 150#. Fifty gallons of water weighs 400#.
Total: 550#. Not a lot. If your box will support you and two male friends, you're good to go.
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Eigenvector wrote:

24" x 32"? I'd go 4 full block & 1 half block...two layers it will give you a square platform
normally these things are framed out during constrcuton of the garage if you go with with wood make sure the 2x4's against the concrete are treated
I'd go with cinder blocks (CMU's) & use a little SIKA construction adhesive to glue everything together...if you're in e/q country doin't forget the strapping
cheers Bob
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just buy a stand they arent expensive..
wood is flammable:( and not very strong with 600 pounds ion such a small footprint.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

per hallerb's suggestion
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId3314-11713-40S22U&lpage=none
This thing would never fly in CA as sold....no lateral resistant, but you could box it out with four plywood skins
cheers
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where do you get the 600 lbs figure from?
--
Steve Barker



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Steve Barker LT wrote:

Yeah, the 600 lbs is a little high but I think installers just multiply the w/h capacity by 10 to get a rough (but conservative) weight estimate....
At 10 lbs per gallon you'd be about 20% on the weight of the water alone but the w/h hearter probably wieighs about 1 lb per gallon of capacity so 10 lbs per gallon for the entire installion isn't all that "wrong"
plus its much easier to do the arithmetic :)
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

I just put in a water heater and saw where the sucker, if in California, had to be strapped to the wall.
Why?
It's not like it's going to fall over from fright or something or even get knocked over! And even if the water heater just got so tired it collapsed from exhaustion, so what?
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Part of the code in Ca for increased earthquake survivability.
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Every complicated problem has a simple solution that doesn\'t work.

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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HeyBub wrote:

We have earthquakes in California and anything approaching (or above) a 3:1 height to base ratio is a possible tipping hazard.
A DIY installation of strapping is cheap insurance to help prevent water damage or a gas leak (fire)
cheers Bob.
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BobK207 wrote:

Thanks, Larry and Bob. I forgot about earthquakes.
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