hot tub temperature

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What about Sundance brand? (anyone) One of the ones I personally liked (although I didn't see it running) was a Sundance.
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2006 19:56:45 -0400, Jud McCranie

That might be another one of the high-end brands, but I can't remember. Did you sit in it? My experience is that the better spas have more comfortable seats; the seats are what sold me on my Beachcomber, and everyone loves them.
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I think I did (dry).
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RTFM.
IIRC, federal health regulations put the limit at 104. The manual to the spa will state the temp range.
100 is a common setting. Above that can cause health problems with some individuals.
Steve
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Jud McCranie wrote:

Hi, Has to be higher than our typical body temperature. 100F = 37.8C, I'd like to see it goes upto 40C at least.
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40 degrees celsius is 104 degrees Fahrenheit. That is the safe limit for humans, and the limit set on most spas. But there is also a time limit for each temperature.
Google hot tub safety and learn. If you are going into a hot tub, or are setting the temperatures, know what you are doing. There is much more to it than hot water, and general idiotic statements.
A friend of mine had a heart attack and died after spending too much time in the hot water at Pah Tempe in Hurricane, Utah.
Steve
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2006 18:15:43 -0400, Jud McCranie
Thank you everyone! Many more replies than I expected, with a lot of information. We're still looking and shopping.
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On Friday, April 14, 2006 3:15:43 PM UTC-7, Jud McCranie wrote:

Hi, I was just wondering if you actually found a simple way to increase the heat, I would like 108, (then when it cools down it isn't so cold). Tried reading through the forum but it seemed to just get argumentative so I stopped reading.
Thank you.
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On Saturday, February 1, 2014 6:26:24 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This is where big govt and fear of lawsuits gets you. SPAs in the USA are limited to 104F, even if you want to have yours at 108F and you have sense enough to use it properly. Seems there are some folks dumb enough to get drunk, stay in it for hours, etc. Another problem is those temp accuracies can probably drift, so while it thinks it's 104, it may be somewhat less too. If you measure it and it's not 104F, then you can call a spa store, etc and ask them what it takes to fix that. If it's an adjustment, then it should be a min service call. If it's not adjustable, then it's probably going to be expensive.
Whether you can change the max temp would seem to depend on the design of the actual spa. I would doubt the manufacturer would make it easy to do so. And it's probably going to be hard to find a schematic, etc to figure out if it's possible to do on your own.
Since you say that yours cools down, it sounds like you have a 120V model that does not heat once the pump is turned on high? Years ago I bought a 120V spa and when I was buying it, the shysters at the store never explained the problems with 120V, only the advantages. The problems are that it takes 4X as long to heat, which means if you only use it once in a while and keep it turned way down, it takes many hours to get to temp. And the second is that it no longer heats once the pump goes on high, ie when you're using it. If you have a 240V unit, then there is no reason it can't heat while being used and easily maintain or increase the temperature.
If that's the main problem you have, you may be able to have it converted to 240V. Right after I bought it, that's what I did. The store swapped out the power pack/heater unit for a couple hundred bucks. Of course the other problem is that even if that's possible, you have to run 240V to it, which could be easy or hard, depending on where it's located. And it could be cheap or expensive, depending on if you can do the work yourself. But the difference is substantial, you get 4X the heating capability and can run the heater while the pump is on full too.
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