Hot Tub Slab

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Marcy wrote:

Before you rent a jackhammer or hire someone to deal with it, try using a sledgehammer on it yourself. It's hard to break up concrete when it's flat on the ground, which just absorbs the shock of the sledge blows. Frankly, an 8 x 8 slab is probably too large and heavy for you to pry up yourself, but you could try it with a steel pry bar. Otherwise, this worked for me: start at one of the corners and dig out/under it a bit. You want that bit of corner hanging over the soil, not supported by it. Slide the pry bar or a 2x4 under that corner, so that pounding that corner with the sledge won't just cause the corner to settle back down into the dirt. Hit the concrete corner a couple times with the sledge. If the corner fractures off easily enough, repeat this process a few more times to break off more pieces of the slab. At some point when the slab gets smaller, you may finally be able to pry it up with a pry bar, at which point slide a 2x4 or two under it to prop it up so it'll keep fracturing more easily. You may decide you can do the whole job yourself. If you decide it's too much effort for you to manage with a sledgehammer, then you can look into renting a jackhammer or hiring the job out.
You have some possible options for getting rid of the concrete. For a fee, a local trash hauler may provide a dumpster you can fill, and they'll remove it in a week or so. There may be a local dump site that'll accept concrete chunks for a fee, if you can manage to haul it over there. Ask around to see if there's a company in the area that does heavy construction, like roadbuilding, where they pour concrete and supply gravel. The one in my area accepts concrete chunks for free, they grind them up and reuse them. I just had to borrow my neighbor's trailer to haul it over there.
Finally, remember you'll end up with a large shallow hole in the yard where the slab was. You'll need to haul in some topsoil to level it off. Now that you've had a chance to think about how much work and expense getting rid of the slab will make for yourself, you may decide you'd rather leave it in place.
HellT
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Thank you so much for the informative post.
I would not mind leaving it and making a second patio out of it, but it is off to the side of the house, not in the back where I would really use it.
I doubt that it has any rebar in it as the owner poured it himself.
I may try your method, and if all else fails, if my male friends cannot bust it up, then hire it out.
Many thanks.
Corinne
Hell Toupee wrote:

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When I was young(er), I might of had at it with the sledge hammer. Nowdays, I would opt for some sort of power tool. The manly way would be to rent a dry concrete saw to score the slab into managable chunks, then use the sledge to break it up. The gentlemanly way would be to use a walk behind wet concrete saw.
Big jackhammers are brutal machines, best left to young, burly studs...
DJ
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wrote:

Dear God, I would much rather swing a hammer than eat the dust from a dry concrete saw. I'm telling you, it really ain't a big deal to do the sledge thing, and I'm 42.
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I could use a hot tub. Give it to me and I'll break up the slab for you.
Marcy wrote:

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Well, where do you live?
Corinne
Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

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Southern California.
Marcy wrote:

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A jackhammer is a good idea, but they're big and heavy. A demolition hammer is the same thing, but much smaller, and made quick work of my cinderblock walls and portions of my slab that needed removing.
Either way, it's best if you dig a bit around one edge of the slab, to give the broken concrete somewhere to go.
Once it's broken up, you can place it in your trash a little at a time, until it's gone.
Frankly, if it works for you, I like the suggestion of using it for a small patio. Plant some tall bushes and a couple small trees around it, throw on some patio furniture, and you have a little private nook away from the rest of the world.
Pagan
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Oops, what they call 10 mm rebar around here (1/2")
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wrote:

10mm is .3937 inches and we would call that #3. That is still plenty for a slab. A pool uses #3 on 12" centers.
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Everyone,
Thanks so much for all the great posts. I got so many replies that I hope all of you don't mind me sending a generic "Thank You".
I am not sure what I will do at this stage, but printed out your emails for my buddies to chew on.
The slab is 8" x 8", and I have a Yorkshire Terrier. I saw a great dog pen for her today that measures 7" x " that I might be able to put on top of it, just to keep her in it a few minutes every morning so I don't have to constantly be with her. She is very tiny and the owls will pick her up so I always have to be with her. If I got one of these pens, with a top on it, that may solve more than one problem.
Great group. Thanks guys.
Marcy
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On Fri 24 Jun 2005 01:30:11a, Marcy wrote in alt.home.repair:

I think a 7" x 7" dog pen might even be too small for a yorkie. :-) Of course, if the slab is only 8" x 8", one could probably just pick it up with one hand and toss it away. :-)
--
Wayne Boatwright **
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