Hot tub electiral problem.

I have a Sundance Cameo hot tub 1997 model and have an electrical problem. The small circulation pump started to trip the GFI main breaker. With the pump disconnected the breaker works fine and dosn't trip. So I replaced the pump with a new one the exact same model pump with same ratings and it still trips the breaker after about 15 to 30 seconds? I can trouble shoot and repair electrical systems but have no information on the Sundance tub other then a small block diagram inside the main electrical box. I'm at a loss as what to try next and would appreciate any help if someone out there knows about Sundance hot tubs. Mine has a model 850 main control board.
Thank You
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Well a GFI breaker is doing two things... It is looking for a "leak" to ground. And it is looking at the total amperage used.
And I think the heating element on a hot tub will not be turned on unless there is water flowing?
So could be drawing too much amperage. Or breaker could be bad. Or something could be leaking to ground, but only when pump is running.
Does not make sense that a new pump would be leaking to ground, so I would think that something else is the problem.
May want to try disconnecting the heating element and see what happens.
Next might try disconnecting water flow switch which would also keep the heating element from working (so far as I know about these things).
But then, if disconnecting the heating element or flow switch stops the breaker from tripping, is it because the heating element was drawing too much amperage or because it was leaking to ground, or because associated wiring was leaking to ground?
I suppose a wire could be wet somewhere and leaking to ground. Look for any dampness. (Disconnect electricity first of course before poking around).
Ultimately I guess you would need an ampmeter and or a volt/ohm meter, or replace parts until problem is solved, or try replacing GFI if nothing else worked. But all of these are expensive, so may just want to call a repair company...
"jr" wrote in message

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As a test, I'd try hooking the pump up direct to another AC source. Then with the pump running, run the spa heater, blower, etc, and see if the GFCI still trips. If it does, then you know there is likely a leakage to ground somewhere in the control pack or wiring. If it doesn't, then it could be a total amp draw issue, though that seems less likely.
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On 6 Nov 2005 04:57:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

If the OP has a ground fault and the GFI is taking 15-30 seconds to trip, I think I'll pass on any invitation to go over for a dip.
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Thanks for all your replies. I found that it is the flow switch or flow sensor not sure what name to call it by. Anyway I diconnected the flow sensor both wires to it and the breaker no longer trips. When I first was trying different things to find the problem I only disconnect one side of the flow sensor not both. That was my mistake for if I had unhook both wires the first time around I would not have gone out a bought an expesive replacement pump. Now I need to track down a new flow sensor. Thanks again for your help.
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This doesn't make sense. I'm guessing (but surely do not know for certain) that the flow sensor is interlocked to the heating element. No flow, no heat. No heat, less current demand; breaker doesn't trip.
That said, if this is a two-terminal device then it should be functionally disabled with only one lead disconnected.
What are you going to do after you replace it and the breaker still trips? If you believe that this is the problem component, if I were you, I would do some further troubleshooting.
Run the pump and see whether there is a contact closure or resistance change between the sensor terminals. Also measure the resistance between each terminal and ground, with and without flow. Something is fishy.
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THE most likely source of leakage is the heater.
The likely "point of leakage" is where the power is connected to the heating element.
Thus, the FIRST thing you do when you have GFCI tripping problems is COMPLETELY disconnect the heater and leave everything else alone.
Motors usually don't develop leakage paths until they are WET.
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Well the problem is solved now, the cover on the sensor was allowing water get onto the sensor from outside the tub. The tub has a vent to the outside world just in front of the sensor and we had a strong wind and rain strom the day before. All I did was remove the cover over the flow sensor and found that some water was sitting on top of it. Dried the top of the sensor off and replaced the cover turned on the power and it works fine now.
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Good job! It's always something simple it seems.... It is just finding that "simple problem" which is the chore!
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