Hot tub couple electrical questions

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680.42 Outdoor Installations. A spa or hot tub installed outdoors shall comply with the provisions of Parts I and II of this article, except as permitted in 680.42(A) and (B), that would otherwise apply to pools installed outdoors.
-- Mark Kent, WA
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Thanks!

refers
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Ok I think it's all just about set, just one last question: I have to enter the tub opposite from the termination point, and am wondering the easiest way to handle the run on the inside of the tub enclosure. The run is about 12' to the control box, and there are some pumps and other stuff in the way in between. I am pretty sure the enclosure is not an approved raceway. I am not sure if splices in this run are permitted, but it certainly would seem easier to set a j-box, run an SO cord or use another flexible nonmetallic method inside the tub rather than try to snake PVC through it. The run is too long to use liquidtight flex.
Thanks much for all the help.
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he NEC requires the ground to be unbroken. That is tough but not impossible to do with a subpanel. Impossible if you change wiring types. Dig around the outside and install the wireing to the code. Changing types of conduit is not against the code. There are several plastic flex's available, called ENT if I remember correctly. That might solve your problem and meet the code. Safety first.
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As far as I know, the ground is normally broken at the subpanel to ground the enclosure. I believe a ground can be legally spliced with a crimp or welded connection, but my main concern is if the NEC actually prohibits making a splice in a feeder (not just ground) to a hot tub or spa, and furthermore if a cord is even permitted (I'm guessing not.)
Really I'd prefer not to have to make any splices, and just run the THHN the whole way. There is no access to re-dig the trench to run it directly to the controller access. The length of the run that would need to be in liquidtight flex (inside the tub enclosure) is 12', and as far as I know, that is above what the code allows in that type of conduit. Is there another type of plastic flex that does not have that same restriction? Is it permitted to run successive lengths of plastic flex with a j-box in between to effectively reduce the contiguous length and get within the NEC requirement?
Thanks

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Is it really that the "run is too long to use liquidtight flex." Or is it just too long to use liquidtight flexible metallic conduit as the grounding path. -- Tom
mi partTime wrote:

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I always thought the limit was 6 ft. but looking at the code it looks like there is a section that indicates it is permitted. . .
356.10 Uses Permitted. . .(LFNC article)
(5) Type LFNC-B shall be permitted to be installed in lengths longer than 1.8 m (6 ft) where secured in ac-cordance with 356.30
Which indicates as long as it is supported every 3 ft. and within 1 ft. of the fittings and boxes that it is ok. I'm gonna go with it.
Again, thanks this is a great resource
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The conduit rules for hot tubs are more stringent than the normal raceway use rules. I think you'll need either a long cord, or limit yourself to 6 feet of flex. Ref:
680.42 (A) Flexible Connections. Listed packaged spa or hot tub equipment assemblies or self-contained spas or hot tubs utilizing a factory-installed or assembled control panel or panelboard shall be permitted to use flexible connections as covered in 680.42(A)(1) and (A)(2). (1) Flexible Conduit. Liquidtight flexible metal conduit or liquidtight flexible nonmetallic conduit shall be permitted in lengths of not more than 1.8 m (6 ft). (2) Cord-and-Plug Connections. Cord-and-plug connections with a cord not longer than 4.6 m (15 ft) shall be permitted where protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter.
--
Mark
Kent, WA
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