Horses Getting FAKE shocks ?

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On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 12:12:14 GMT, "rb608"

Hmmmm, I never thought about this possibility..... 60 cycle hum ...... ?????
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Is it possible that the fence charger is operating a frequency higher than your multimeter can respond to?
As an experiment you could put a metallic object in the (plastic) water tank and connect it to a shallow, or surface ground that you hose down. This is not a good long term solution but might help in isolating the cause of their unhappiness.
RB
snipped-for-privacy@NoEmail.com wrote:

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Irish,
It's clear that you don't know what the problem is so you don't know what to do. It would appear that the problem is related to using water heaters. It is not clear that the problem is due to shocks or is electrical in nature. You know that other horses in other pastures are ok. Swap pastures. Put your 2 complainers in a new pasture and see if the water heater in that pasture offends them. If the problem is pasture specific try swapping gear in the "bad" pasture with gear from another pasture. If the problem is horse specific, eat the horses.
Dave M.
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Pull off your shoes and socks and stand directly on the ground barefooted while sticking your tongue in the water. I bet you feel the tingle that the horse feels.
You have to ground yourself good and use a more sensitive part of your body than your hand to feel the tiny shocks.
Then add copper grounding strips to all your tanks and drive the copper rod down into the tundra.
PJ
On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 03:20:31 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@NoEmail.com wrote:

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Exactly. If a GFI isn't tripping, it means that the current is below 3-5ma. But not necessarily zero. You _can_ feel shocks lower than 3-5ma if you work hard enough at it like PJ suggests. Indeed, jolts in the 10s of microamps range can kill given suitable conditions (ground loops in operating rooms).
Electrical code gets _very_ anal about grounding of stock tanks, milkers, and other equipment/structures around animals.

While you're doing that, check the heater. The heater is probably leaking a bit. While the GFI _should_ save the horses, I think you'd want to check out anything suspicious anyway.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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What is the electrical design for the circuits feeding the heaters and fences? Is there a single barn panel that feeds all of these, or are there multiple panels? In the panels you do have, are they fed with 3 or 4 wire feeders? Is the water trough grounded in any way, either by a metallic heater (with a grounding type plug), a metal water pipe, or something else? I'm betting the heaters, since unplugging them seems to fix the problem.
It is possible you have a small current gradient through the earth. This is not a "leak", but caused by voltage drop in the conductors that are grounded in the earth in different locations without a separate bonding wire. That in itself shouldn't bother horses, but if there is a grounded metal heater or tank that is at a different potential than the dirt near it, the horse will get a small shock (say about 5V or so). If you don't think that can hurt, try sticking a 9V battery on your tongue. I think that is what the horses are feeling. Or do what the other poster suggested -- stand barefoot on the ground and put your tongue in that tank.
-- Mark Kent, WA
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