Hooking up humidifier to water supply

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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 12:35:14 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

No, mass has nothing to do with efficiency. The heat that the mass "gives off" has to be "put in" first. In fact, it's a loser because mass adds hysterias to the system.
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If you have a water softener, you should connect it to soft water. Maybe that's why it's connected to the hot side?
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On 1/10/2013 2:51 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

that hot water evaporates quicker. However, in my case, by the time the water gets to the evaporator it is cold again. Furthermore, there is the issue of waste water. I'd go for the cold if I were to do it again in my layout.
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On 1/10/2013 5:02 PM, Pointer wrote:

Looking at my set up, the water travels through about 8 feet of small copper tubing, so, if it were hot, it would certainly be near room temperature by the time it got to the humidifier.
Also the heat of vaporization of water is considerably higher than the temperature differential between hot and cold water.
http://www.kentchemistry.com/links/Energy/HeatVaporization.htm
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?

Wild guess, I seem to remember the ice makers were suspose to be hooked to the hot water. The reson was the hot water tank acted as a filter tank for the trash in the water.
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 19:21:28 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

sense, though it'll rarely, if ever, get to the ice maker.
One of these days I'm going to add a "standard" filter in the line. I have a lot of room in the basement for it. ;-)
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I have an Aprilaire hooked up to hot water through about 8 t of 1/4" copper tubing. The water is still very hot when it enters the unit. You just don't lose that much heat in 8 ft of tubing, unless it's at a unusually slow flow rate.
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