Homeowner's insurance house inspections

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After owning a home for 18 years, my homeowner's insurance company notified that they require a complete inspection of my house in order to continue my insurance (I've never had a claim). They want to do a full exterior, interior, and mechanicals inspection. I couldn't get an answer from them as to what would happen if they didn't like something.
This is something I've never heard of. Anyone else have this experience?
Thanks in advance,
Mike Shapp snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
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Yes. I've gotten a few notices like that on my main residence, and I did not respond. Nothing ever happened. On another residence, covered by a different insurer they came uninvited, and looked around the grounds but were not admitted to the house. I know what you think. That's trespassing. Doesn't matter. Your insurance policy no doubt gives them the right to "reasonable access for inspections with proper notice". Go read it. They had sent one of those notices that they wanted to come, and I didn't respond, hoping that it was a bluff like the other ones. They found a few things they didn't like. Basically things like deck railings that had been up to code when built, but were not up to current code. I was given the choice of bringing thise things up to code, or not be renewed. In retrospect, I should have complied as quickly as possible. I didn't. This is a unique, Frank Lloyd Wright inspired custom built house that has been featured many times in major magazines. I didn't like the idea of screwing with the asthetics of the original design. Bringing it up to code without ruining the historic looks would have cost a fortune, and it just wouldn't have been the same. Now, to remain insured, they are going to want a full inspection of everything, and that will uncover a ton of other things I'm sure they are not going to like. It's going to cost a bundle by the time its all over.
CWM
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Charlie Morgan writes:

Good for you. Keep fighting.
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I have friends who went thru insurance inspections, they HAD to replace all their K&T wiring, tried getting a different company but no one else would take them. It appears theres a credit bureau version, home inspection bureau, once spotted no one wants you. He had to replace porch and a bunch of other minor stuff. Bad sidewalk must be repaired, front steps? no railing? MUST be added.
will spent about 10 grand upgrading home, was very mad but had NO CHOICE!
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At this point I'm fighting to remain insured. I'm expecting to spend a few hundred thousand on updates before I'm in compliance. I don't really have much choice.
CWM
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For such a house, you need a carrier out of the mainstream, or at least a policy underwritten for the particular characteristics of the house. Expecting adequate coverage for such a residence even if they do underwrite it in case of loss is unreasonable -- average premiums pay for average structures.
There are firms who do underwrite these sorts of things. Also, there should be help from state and/or local agencies for historical preservation which would be another first place to turn for sources and other help.
Alternatively, given the money you're talking of spending, there's the possibility to consider of putting that out and becoming self-insured.
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Who said I was paying "average" premiums for an average house?

The main issue for me is the liability insurance, which I really have to have. The insurance companies only care about risk. If they don't feel it's safe to THEIR standards, they really don't care. If someone gets severely injured on the property, a few hundred thousand isn't going to cover it.
CWM
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--
Unless there is something about the structure that is _extremely_
dangerous or a useage that makes risk inordinately high such as large,
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wrote:

Hire an independent inspector to refute the company claims. Maybe from the next town. I've used this approach with "appraisers"; when selling a home.
-- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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I had one of these a couple of years ago. The issue was more of an "inventory" one. They wanted to be sure that was they were insuring was what they were insuring. Very cursory inspection -- size,layout, general nature of building. That was it. However, when I moved recently and placed insurance with the same company, they were an utter PITA about dogs and firearms. Really IGNORANT questions. I got a little upset, needless to say.
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IIRC, there's been a surge in lawsuits against homeowners who have dogs over alleged attacks. Sounds like your company is trying to assess the risk that you'll get sued and they'd have to defend against it.
Not sure why the firwrm sensitivity, but maybe they've had a problem there also.
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They were really interested in what breed, if the dog bit, if it was confined to the property, etc. I have a Lhasa Apso/Shih Tzu mix that weighs out at 18#. As to the firearms, they were concerned if children were in the house (mine are grown), what ones I had (I basically said they were legal to have, and more than that, it was really none of their business), and if they were secured, whatever that might mean to them. BTW, the dog is used for pet therapy work in nursing homes.
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had another friend their roof needed replacing, they didnt have the bucks homeowners cancelled. mortage company gave them forced place insurance on structure only at 6 times cost of previous complete coverage.
cat knocked over lamp caused bad fire 135,000 bucks damage to structure NO COVERAGE FOR CONTENTS at all.
it was a very bad thing and took over 2 years for them to get back in their home, most of their fire damaged belongings are still in storage 5 years later.
insurance companies used to look at homeowners as cash cow, but hurricanes and lawsuits over dogs, trip and fall on bad sidewalks and everyone suing has them nervous and fussy about who they insure.........
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Note, however, that they probably aren't asking what kind of guns you have just to be nosy. Presumably, they have analyzed claims payments, and determined that people with one kind of gun cost them more than people with another kind of gun. If you don't want to tell them what kind you have, they might play it safe, and assume the kind that costs them the most, and charge you accordingly.
--
--Tim Smith

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says...

Yep. Even if there are no kids in the house, visitors can be an issue with guns.
A lot of my extended family hunt and have hunting dogs - your dog isn't a fighting breed, so just answer the questions (you *do* take safety precautions with the guns, right?) and you'll be fine. Don't make problems for yourself.
Banty
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I think a federal law should be created, all guns MUST have trigger locks in place at all times.
So a kid gets a unsecured gun and shoots someone, the gun owner should do 5 years mandatory sentence and lose everything.
soon things would be much safer, no more crying grandpas on tv about their grandchild going to jail after using their gun to kill a neighbor kid by accident.
altogether preventable
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I'll tell you what -- you first. Put trigger locks on all your guns, then put a sign in your front yard advising all and sundry that you have them in place. Hope nobody ever breaks into your house.

Why only five?

Oddly enough, this wasn't really much of a problem forty, or a hundred, years ago, when gun ownership was more common and widespread.

Most easily preventable by education. The National Rifle Association is a leader in this area, with their "Eddie the Eagle" safety program for elementary-school kids. Eddie Eagle says, if you see a gun -- 1) STOP! Don't touch it! 2) Leave the area. 3) Tell an adult.
As soon as my kids were old enough to understand, I made sure to tell them that the guns are not toys, and never to be touched unsupervised -- and *also* told them that *whenever* they got curious about how the guns worked, or wanted to see or hold or touch one, all they needed to do was ask, and I'd get one out of the [locked] cabinet so we could look at it *together*. That takes the mystery out of it, and most of the allure of forbidden fruit, too. Once or twice a year, they'd ask to look at them, and I always stopped whatever I was doing to show them. My youngest (now nearly 16) still asks to look at the handguns from time to time.
I further made a point of telling them that the guns on TV are not real guns, and the guns in my cabinet *are* real guns, and real guns make things real dead. I made sure they understood the difference, too, by taking them hunting with me. Conveniently, where we lived at the time, we had a hay field right outside the house, jamb full of rabbits. And they saw at a very early age (like 3 or 4 years) that it's not like Elmer Fudd shooting Bugs Bunny: when Dad shoots a rabbit, it's *dead*. It doesn't laugh, or jump up and ask "what's up, Doc?". It's dead. It just lays there. And we pick it up, take it back to the house, clean it, cut it up, cook it, and eat it.
It's all about education.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Not to necessarily disagree with the rest of your post, but it *was* a problem forty, or a hundred years ago. My family bible attests to that.
As well as others'. Gun accidents were common.
Banty
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

This has more to do with changing standards of legal liability than with changes in the insurance business. A hundred years ago, few juries would find you liable if some idiot shot himself with your gun.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/
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Nanny-state refers to protecting us from ourselves, and I can give you many examples of how I hate that. Seat-belt laws, helmet laws for non-children, anti-smoking laws for bars, anti-transfat laws.
But it's already the obligation of the state to protect us from others.
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