Home wiring

Would like to change a single switch, which controls an outlet, to a dual decora switch to control two outlets for cabinet lights. Incoming wire is 12/3 (black, white, grd), while current outgoing wire is 12/4 (white, black, red, grd). I haven't bought a new outlet yet as I am unsure what to buy.
Do I need to run seperate service to each outlet and break steel tab on outlet? Or Can I use existing wiring to service outlet so both switches work?
Thanks,
Michael
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MikenAZ wrote:

The new outlet could be the problem. The switch is just a switch no problem. Putting in a new outlet means running new wires to it. You can't just cut an existing wire in a wall and add an outlet. It does not sound like you have the experience and knowledge to do this safely.
However if all you want to do is change out the switch and change the outlet to now both the top and bottom plugs are switched, that is doable. Is that what you want to do?
I wonder if making both outlets switched could cause a local code violation with not having an outlet available over X number of feet of wall space, since both would become switched outlets?
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You said there is a three conductor cable leaving the switch. To control the existing outlet would only require two, so what does the third one connect to and where does it go?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Joe is correct about making both parts of the outlet switched.
The OP needs to run more wire to the switch box for the cabinet lights.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks ALL!
I will have two outlets available over a 100" opening. The new outlet is actually going to be hidden so I can connect low voltage cabinet florescent lamps. I would like to be able to switch these on and off at the wall, rather than plugging and unplugging. There will also be lights in the glass cabinets above that will be switched on/off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MikenAZ wrote:

Have you figured out how you are going to pull the wire for the new outlet or the existing switch?
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Likely one outlet of the duplex is switched and the other is not switched (with the ear removed)
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

This ground you refer to, is it an uninsulated wire? If so, you have 12/2 and 12/3 wire, because that one isn't counted.

What is the point of breaking the steel? tab?
Is the current outlet on the way to the second new outlet? Or is it in another direction? If the first is true or can be thought to be true, you run a new piece of 12/2 from the current outlet to the new.

Does the existing wiring go to this outlet that doesn't exist yet? That would be surprising!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
MikenAZ wrote:

I think most of the replies are misinterpreting what you're trying to do. I'm thinking you are referring to an existing duplex outlet in which one half is switched and the other half is constant. You want to have both half's of the outlet independently switched to power two sets of lights in a cabinet that will be in front of the outlet in question.
It sounds like the existing wiring is 12/2 for power coming in to the switch box and 12/3 heading to the outlet with one leg switched. The wiring would be the black hot leg from the incoming 12/2 connecting to the switch and also to one of the outbound wires, probably also black, heading to the outlet. The other outbound wire, probably red, connects to the other switch terminal. At the outlet the black wire connects to the unswitched half and the red to the switched half. The link tab on the hot side of the outlet is of course removed.
Ignoring any code issues re: spacing between non switched outlets, it's an extremely simple matter to convert this setup to both switched, as long as there are no connections heading out from the outlet to provide unswitched power to other outlets. Assuming the 12/3 wire from the switch box terminates at the outlet in question, all you have to do is wire the double switch with the black hot from the incoming 12/2 to the common terminal of the double switch, and wire the outbound red and black wires of the 12/3 to the outlet to each of the two switch terminals.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.