Home Theater Raised Platform

I am planning to add a second row of rear seating on a raised platform in my Home Theater. I am wondering how others have done this.
The HT room already has wall to wall carpeting. So is it better to build a floating platform which rests on top of the existing carpet, and then carpet just the platform, or should the wall to wall carpet be pulled up, the platform anchored to the floor, and then recarpet the room.
I only have plywood subflooring, so there is no hardwood floors to worry about. TIA. Regards...
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It seems that every time I build a wall or cabinet over existing carpet, sooner or later it develops mold/mildew/moisture type problems. I would recommend pulling up the carpeting, installing the woodwork, carpet or tile as required.
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DanG:

Why would you get mold?
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lanman:

This. I can't imagine why you get mold problems unless you're a slob. Frankly, I don't know what code is but if built solid it shouldn't need to be anchored to the floor.
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Seats permanently attached to the floor?

If using normal home furniture (not fastened to the floor) the box does not need to be fastened down either. You probably only need six to eight inches of height, and a simple box will be fine. I recommend you build it in sections that can be moved and placed by one or two people rather than a huge thing that cannot be moved. Think portable risers such as used by choirs all over the world.
Here's an interesting article integrating speakers into the riser: http://www.audioholics.com/tweaks/do-it-yourself-diy-topics/multifunction-theater-seat-riser (Note that is essentially a permanent riser, not portable, and unlike that one, I'd recommend letting the top overhang the sides about an inch. Look at your stairs for an example.)
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sylvan butler wrote:

All the video conference rooms at work have those islands for the peanut gallery. If the chairs have wheels, make sure you put at least a 3/4" hardwood curb around the edges. Having someone absentmindedly roll off the edge and bust their ass, really throws a damper on a movie evening.
aem sends...
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Whatever construction method you choose, think about foam or some other insulating material to keep the sound muffled if people tap their foot or kick them while getting up or sitting down. Less disturbance/distraction to the others in the room. A hollow box could make a lot of noise. Obviously, the more solid you make them, the less noise they will make.
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