Home plumbing: Copper VS plastic-type pipes


I was talking to a plumber and he told me that new houses being built no longer use copper plumbing. In fact, he told me that the "plastic type" pipes (I forget what the material actually is) is actually superior to copper.
Is this true? It seems to me that copper would stand up better against the elements "freezing, etc" than Plastic would.
Please advise.
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When I put the addition on our house in the late 80's I used the white 1/2" CPVC pipe and have regretted using it since. It was easier to assembly, just glue, no soldering but if you look in the end of the pipe the wall thickness is bigger than copper. This creates reduced water volume. Our shower in the addition is about 3/4 strength that it should be, toilet takes longer to fill, etc.
Stick to copper.
And hopefully your house doesn't get cold enough for the pipes to freeze.
Brian
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labor time substantially from what I see. No threading, soldering or gluing. The PEX is cut to size with a plier type cutter and clamped with a squeeze type clamping tool. Looks very easy for do-it-yourselfers but the clamping tool is very expensive.
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PEX is great. water stays warmer in pex, its flexible, easier to install, ONE LINE to each fixture will all valves on a manifold, no buried connections in walls. its been used in europe for a long time. when we redo our bath PEX will replace the copper, with a dedicated line to each fixture. no more scalds if someone flushes the toilet.
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It rents for $ 10/day at Home Depot
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says...

Or buy it for $130, use it as long as you need it, and surplus it on eBay for almost what you paid for it.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/
  Click to see the full signature.
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Interesting. While checking eBay to see what those tools are going for, I noticed this "buy it now" listing, for a tool that handles all three sizes, and is only $40 new.
I wonder if it is any good?
<http://cgi.ebay.com/PEX-Crimp-Tool-3-8-1-2-3-4-Crimper_W0QQitemZ26011371 2841QQihZ016QQcategoryZ42133QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem>
<http://tinyurl.com/342jck
--
--Tim Smith

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Naww..Never use CPVC for a "real" house..maybe for mobile home replacement..
The "new" plastic is called PEX. I'd use it over copper any day as long as the plumber knows how to install it. I do. Do a Google search for Aquapex or Wirsbo. Its great stuff. Had it put in our last two custom homes. Easy to work with..No soldered joints. No air hammers or pipe noise.
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Again, Rudy, what happens if somehow you had a rodent chewed through the PEX? And how long does PEX last? ANd what of water pressure? Is there any chance it could rupture under too much pressure? And what of attic installation? If it gets 105 in the desert, the attic of a house could really bake. Could it not exceed the 200 degrees?
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What if an asteroid crashed thru the roof and hit the pipe ?
And how long does PEX last?
The Wirsbo PEX is cross-linked polyethylene with an oxygen infusion barrier. It has been used in Europe for 30 years, with more than 4 billion feet of installed tubing performing without a single incidence of product failure. 500 million feet of that is in North America alone. Samples of the tubing have been under high temperature and pressure continuously since 1973, with no sign of decreased performance. Tests, both by Wirsbo and independent sources, predict that the Wirsbo PEX tubing should have a system life in excess of 100 years
And what of water pressure? Is there any chance it could rupture under too much pressure?
Wirsbo PEX tubing currently holds the unofficial world record for long-term testing at elevated temperature and pressure -- 26 years at 203 F at 151 psi, and still going. When the test is completed, the record will be official.

No..our house was in the Sonoran desert where the OAT EXCEEDED 105 oF. The PEX was plumbed thru the attic spaces. No problems after 8 1/2 years and BTW, see above, Home plumbing is NEVER anywhere near 150 PSI..more like 70 # or less.
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Thanks for the info, it's much appreciated. So you think if I ever need to get my 1966 home re-plumed, I should NOT insist on copper???
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SB-
I assume your 1966 home was plumbed with copper?
If so, unless you've got water chemistry (usually well water) that eats copper, that copper piping in your home will a very, very long time.
My parents house (1959, SoCal) was plumbed with copper & no problems so far. I just re-piped with PEX removing the original 1930 galv steel. The water in my area must be particularly easy on pipes. :)
If your home ever needs re-pipe (& I doubt it will) Type L copper or PEX would both be good choices
cheers Bob
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Thanks for the info, it's much appreciated. So you think if I ever need to get my 1966 home re-plumed, I should NOT insist on copper???
Copper is fine too. I just prefer the ease, savings and other 'plusses' of PEX
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On May 2, 3:09 am, snipped-for-privacy@personainternet.com wrote:

Brian-
The inside diameters of
1/2" CPVC . 602" 1/2" copper type L .545" 1/2" copper type M .569"
flow through the CPVC should easily be equal or better than 1/2" copper
Even in nominal 3/4 size, the inside diameters are about equal between CPVC & copper
Unless you've got a really long run to that shower, 1/2 CPVC should supply it just fine.
I wondering if there might be another cause?
cheers Bob
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I some cases plastic or the garden hose type PEX is superior due to soil conditions copper will deteriorate. Butt 99% of the time copper is best plus rodents can not chew threw it, witch has happened . Copper prices arte extremely high, the plastic type pipeing system are all about saving Money & time for you and the contractor. PRICE , QUALITY, TIME any two not all three.
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extremely high, the plastic type pipeing system are all about saving Money & time for you and the contractor. PRICE , QUALITY, TIME any two not all three. <<<<
I would agree with Dave's comments
Just did a re-pipe (1930 2 story, 2 bath, kitchen & laundry) with a PEX / copper hybrid system.
After researching it for a LONG time & then finally taking the plunge .........I consider myself fairly knowledgeable about the choices & options.
All the "easy / straight" runs from the meter to my "utility basement" & sprinkler valve manifolds we done in copper.

I did a very careful demolition & prep for the installation since I didn't want to damage the decorative plaster in the "public areas" of the house
The flexiblilty of the PEX (more than soft copper, less than a garden hose) allowed the PEX to be easily (relatively) snaked through crawlspace & walls. The 90 deg sweeps up to fixture angle stops were pretty easy as well.
No fittings except at manifolds & fixtures.
The installation was a breeze, we used the expander system not the crimp ring..............no leaks! (yet?)
I did (do) have some concerns........rodents, chlorine & nails
but the PEX was so much faster, easier & less damaging to my house that I went with it. I'm very happy (so far) but we'll see.
If I had a blank slate ( a new or completely gutted home) I think I might stick with copper but the benefits of PEX are pretty enticing ......
The home run manifold system is pretty cool
oh.....one last comment, a PEX system seems to be much quieter than copper, the new copper Iines (great flow!) are pretty noisy (flow not water hammer)
cheers Bob
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PVC is superior t metallic pipes in all respects- no corrosion and should last longer than the house.

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IIRC, PVC is NOT code for inside homes
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wrote:

Depends on who's code. It's legal most places, except that (I think) you're supposed to use CPVC for hot water, and most people therefore use it for everything, because they can't be bothered to keep track.
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