home office light bulb issue

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On 07/10/2013 04:31 PM, rlz wrote:

It's not. There are screw connections ("backwire") which allow two wires to go under one screw, but I have never seen a ground screw that was anything other than the standard loop the wire under it type.
If this is a metal box, that should also be grounded.
Typically to save space in a situation like that, I will loop one ground wire under the ground screw for the box and leave a couple inches free; then do the same thing with the other wire under the screw on the switch/receptacle, then splice the two together with a yellow wire nut. That way I don't have a bunch of pigtails in the box unnecessarily taking up space. This is assuming, of course, that the installer left enough length on the wires for you to do this.

That's possible too, although I have to say I expect the quality of incandescent bulbs to start dropping if it hasn't already as they are starting to be phased out. I just hope that good high-CRI LED bulbs are available and inexpensive by the time that we can't get incandescents at all anymore. I liked the Philips L-prize bulb but sadly it's been already discontinued - I did managed to snag a couple from HD while they were $15 though.
nate
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wrote:

If it is a metal box and the box is grounded the ground screw is redundant unless it is an isolated ground outlet.

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On 7/10/2013 7:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In the US switches can be grounded through the mounting screws to a metal box. That is not true for receptacles unless they are "self grounding" or are on some surface mount boxes.
From the OP's description, my guess is he has a plastic switch box.
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You have my curiosity. Two ground wires, live and load? Tell me some more about that. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I'm an electronic technician by trade, so I understand power concepts,
Thanks everyone for the post.
When I replaced the switch this morning, I found both ground wires (live & load) physically attached to the grounding screw. So I disassembled them, crimped them together while adding a pigtail to attach to the switch. I didn't think this was allowed having two ground wires on one grounding screw.
Robin
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On 07/11/2013 07:19 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'm assuming that he's using "live" for "line" and he's referring to the cables not individual conductors, e.g. "live" enters the box from the breaker panel and "load" is the cable from the switch box to the fixture box. Not common terminology but at least I thought I understood where he was going with that.
If I'm wrong, Robin, please clarify...
nate
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On Thursday, July 11, 2013 9:50:21 AM UTC-6, Nate Nagel wrote:

r A. Young Learn more about Jesus > www.lds.org . . "rlz" < snipped-for-privacy@ellzey.net

concepts, > > > Thanks everyone for the post. > > When I replaced the switc h this morning, I found both ground wires > (live & load) physically attach ed to the grounding screw. So I > disassembled them, crimped them together while adding a pigtail to > attach to the switch. I didn't think this was a llowed having two > ground wires on one grounding screw. > > Robin > I'm as suming that he's using "live" for "line" and he's referring to the cables n ot individual conductors, e.g. "live" enters the box from the breaker panel and "load" is the cable from the switch box to the fixture box. Not common terminology but at least I thought I understood where he was going with th at. If I'm wrong, Robin, please clarify... nate -- replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply. http://members.cox.net/njnagel
That is correct. There are two cables coming into the plastic box. The ru n from the breaker and the one going up to the ceiling light fixture. Both of these cables each have a ground wire. Both ground wires were secured t o the grounding screw on the switch. Sorry for the wrong terminology. I t hought "live" and load" was betther than "this one" and "that one"...LOL
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Somehow, doesn't sound right, to have a live ground, and a load ground. Neither should be energized, unless something is wrong. Perhaps some electrician on the list can remind us what those two grounds should be called. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .

switch this morning, I found both ground wires > (live & load) physically attached to the grounding screw. So I > disassembled them, crimped them together while adding a pigtail to > attach to the switch.
I'm assuming that he's using "live" for "line" and he's referring to the cables not individual conductors, e.g. "live" enters the box from the breaker panel and "load" is the cable from the switch box to the fixture box. Not common terminology but at least I thought I understood where he was going with that. If I'm wrong, Robin, please clarify... nate --
That is correct. There are two cables coming into the plastic box. The run from the breaker and the one going up to the ceiling light fixture. Both of these cables each have a ground wire. Both ground wires were secured to the grounding screw on the switch. Sorry for the wrong terminology. I thought "live" and load" was betther than "this one" and "that one"...LOL
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May I add my two sance to all? Replacing the switch should not have any effect on burning of bulb out. Ground wire adding pig tail to making convenient for hook up to switch or receptacle I do not know of any rules that covers that as long is firmly secure to the ground. Remember some houses are wire in with Romax and some with BX . With Romax carries isolated green or bare cooper wire with in cable itself. The BX is metal cover and it carries also ground wire but it is bare because it is option of use If all junction boxes are metal, one does not need ground wire because all connection/junction are metal to metal, however if it is Romax one most use ground wire at all the time. Switches fuses, circuit barker most always be on hot side, in some area you can find that some people or ass holes put switches and fuses/circuit breaker on neutral side, on older system one always most checks or you can get yourself in trouble. Also at no time use neutral as ground or ground as neutral, this could cause big problems with GFI circuits, beside that ground should never carry any current at no time. Well that is what I got to say.
I'm an electronic technician by trade, so I understand power concepts,
Thanks everyone for the post.
When I replaced the switch this morning, I found both ground wires (live & load) physically attached to the grounding screw. So I disassembled them, crimped them together while adding a pigtail to attach to the switch. I didn't think this was allowed having two ground wires on one grounding screw.
Robin
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On Thu, 11 Jul 2013 07:19:05 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

circuit in a circuit with the neutrals tied together and the power switched. Now, if the ground screw in question is the ground screw on the utility box the switch is mounted in, 2 bares under one screw is acceptable - and if the box is a metal box the switch does NOT need to be grounded (at least here in Ontario)
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Robin-
Chances are you had a defective light bulb, as others noted.
If you burn out more bulbs, one other cause could be a loose neutral connection in your power hookup. When that happens, a load imbalance between the two 120 VAC sides of the 240 VAC feed, will result in a high voltage on the side with less load, and low voltage on the side with greater load. (I assume you are in the U.S.)
It is possible for the neutral wire to have an open or high resistance connection at either the power company's transformer, or at your electrical meter.
Fred
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wrote:

Use a desk lamp. Problem solved.
I hate overhead lighting in an office. At home I have a desk lamp with a four tube florescent type of bulb. At work, only in the early morning of winter do I turn a light on. I get enough light from the two windows.
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