Home Inspection[s] pros & cons

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On Friday, November 22, 2013 2:14:54 PM UTC-5, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote:

I suggest you google it. Who the agent is working for depends who hires them and on what basis. If you hire an agent to work for you as a buyer's agent, then their fiduciary responsiblity is to you, the buyer.

Someone who used to frame, I agree is probably not qualified, if that's his sole basis of experience. But someone who is a general contractor and has 20 years of experience is probably more qualified than 95% of the home inspectors out there. If I had a choice of someone who's been building houses for 20

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On Fri, 22 Nov 2013 12:14:54 -0700, Arthur Conan Doyle

Can't speak for all states but the trend for the past 15 or so years has been away from the "we all really work for the seller" agency model to a seller's agent and buyer's agent model. That said, BOTH agents MAIN interest is to SELL a house with the least time investment and earn a commission and to do so in a fashion that won't get them sued. For the most part agents have been schooled to answer almost all questions with "You should hire someone qualified in the field to answer your question on that" once you go beyond the stuff written on the standard Contract to Purchase Form. If you ask "Is this a good neighborhood" they've been told they can't really answer that for fear of violating some law on racial discrimination. If you ask "Are the schools good" they will tell you there is a web site that rates schools and you might want to look at that. If you ask to see houses that which have a lot of professionals or what's teh crime like in this area they will probably refer you to a census web site, again for fear of being sued for "steering" you to or away from some area and violating some discrimination law. If you ask "Are there a lot of homes here with Children" they will tell you they don't really know but perhaps you might come back and drive around to see for yourself. There have been so many lawsuits over all the anti-discrimination laws, undisclosed defects, and on and on, most agents won't really tell you much of anything anymore other then giving you the public copy of the Listing Report. Most agent will say "Isn't this a beautiful home?"

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wrote:

Yes, that change has been relatively recent.

While it's true that an agent's immediate interest is in turning houses, a smart agent will also look to future business. People who buy houses also sell them, often several times over. Make a customer happy once and you will likely have them for a long time. If the agent leaves the agency or starts their own, happy customers tend to follow. The alternative is the unknown, not something people want when making such life-altering changes.

That's because of government interference and fear of lawsuits. They can't afford to be sued for even appearance the wrong information or "discrimination". However, if you listen to what an agent is saying (or not saying) the message is often there.
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On Fri, 22 Nov 2013 07:45:48 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The age of the house doesn't matter (much). I's very hard to be unbiased when looking at a house that you're emotionally attached to (you probably wouldn't consider buying it if you weren't). An inspector is an uninterested observer. It's worth the couple of hundred bucks for that.
You're only talking a few hundred bucks on a few hundred thousand dollar investment. It's cheap money. The inspector will always find something to justify his fee but you can decide for yourself if it's important. Unless it's a foreclosure, the seller will usually pay for any repairs.
It can be difficult choosing an inspector but depending on your relationship with your real estate agent, this can be a good source of information.

It's only a tenth of a percent of the purchase price, so don't screw around. Would you skip a lawyer to save a couple of bucks?
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if your a buyer getting a home inspection makes tons of sense. its almost always the most expensive purchase of your entire life, costs probably under 500 bucks and results can be used to negoiate the home purchase price lower.
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On 11/23/2013 1:04 AM, bob haller wrote:

A home inspector that is not knowledgeable of electrical codes, nor difference in exterior vs interior grade wiring... A home inspector that does not understand the necessity of Gutters.... A Home inspector that does not know his ass from a hole in the ground... choose wisely...
--

Digger
Bob O'Dell
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its best to get a acredited and insured home inspector in cae they miss something, but the low cost of 500 bucks makes it a no brainer.......
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On Saturday, November 23, 2013 3:26:44 AM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

Your chances of collecting anything against a home inspector if they miss something is slim. The typical home inspector contract has standard clauses with all kind of disclaimers to protect them. And even worse, typically even if they miss something, it limits your damages to the lesser of the cost of repairs of the cost of the inspection.
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On Friday, November 22, 2013 7:45:48 AM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Don’t get a home inspector but instead call several contractors like plum bing, hvac, electrical etc. and ask them to give you a free verbal estimate on anything they might find. They are sure to find something just to make money
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Personally, I think it depends on how much you already know and whether you are fairly experienced at buying real estate. It also makes a difference, in my opinion, whether you are buying a property "retail" -- meaning looking at listings for ordinary ready-to-move-in properties primarily as a retail buyer -- or if you are an investor type and you are looking to buy an investment property that may need work etc.
This may seem a little counter-intuitive, but I think of the typical retail purchase of a home as one where it may make more sense to invest in a home inspection, especially if you do not know a lot about building construction, plumbing, electric, water issues, roofing issues, etc. The home inspector typically costs around $500 to $700 in our area (East Coast, New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania area). But, they usually find enough in the way of issues about the property that it will pay (or almost pay) for the cost of the inspection in the form of seller concessions or seller fixes before the closing takes place.
Depending on where you live, one way to find a good home inspector is to look for real estate investor clubs in your area and check out their websites. Most have a list of "business affiliates" or "vendor members" that belong to the club who represent various trades. The members often ask each other for recommendations for home inspectors, structural engineers, mold inspectors and abatement companies, etc. You may not want to join a local real estate investor group unless you plan on investing in real estate, but you may be able to get good recommendations of who to use in your area for particular types of home inspections, or to look at possible structural issues or inspect a septic system, etc.
Here is a link for finding real estate investor clubs in your area: http://www.reiclub.com/real-estate-clubs.php .
Or, if you post the area where you may be buying a home, maybe someone here will know of a good real estate investor club in your area or a really qualified home inspector.
As part of one of the two real estate investor groups that I belong to, I have heard several home inspectors, structural engineers, mold remediation companies, etc. give presentations to our group and I have a good idea of who I would use or recommend if needed.
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On 11/22/2013 9:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The ones I've seen are pretty much jokes. They can find obvious problems but, more often than not, home problems are not. Sometimes they won't even see the obvious things. I think they get tunnel vision and start focusing in on problems they have encountered in the past.
Get one, but take it with a grain of salt. Plus, see if you can find a HI with good credentials.
Your mortgage company may require one anyway.
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