Home Heating Question

I'm wondering how long it takes for your home to heat up. On a normal 35 degree day - if you put up your thermostat 2 degrees how long does your burner run before it shuts down. My burner runs for around 6 minutes. I have a 4 bedroom colonial. I guess it's about 2400 total square footage. I know that there are so many variables but I'm trying to gauge whether or not my new Reillo burner is undersized or not. My boiler supports 134,000 BTU and I just had a Reillo F5 installed with a 1gpm nozzle.
Thanks
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I
not
Too many variables to give an answer. (my guess is that it is OK)
The burner runs enough to heat the water in the system. It is set to run between two setpoints, one high, one low. Once the water is hot enough, it goes off.
Now the variables:
What are the set points? What type of heating elements do you have? i.e..: baseboard, radiator, radiant How many zones? Are they all calling for heat? What is the solar load? What is the thermal mass of the contents of the house? What is the circulator sizing for each zone?
What matters is the sizing of the heater. If it keeps your home comfy on the coldest day of the year, it is big enough. Balance is another issue as you may want some areas warmer than others.
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I think you are right - there are too many variables to get a meaningful comparison. I would answer your question except for the fact that I just took the pump motor from my gas-fired hot water heating system in for repairs this afternoon.
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There are a lot of variables. I have baseboard heat, 3 zones and I keep a basement heated. My windows are all new but the house could be insulated better. The house was built when oil was cheap. So I guess I will know the answer to my question this winter when the temps drop down to 10 degrees for a full week. If the boiler is struggling to keep the house comfy then I guess my boiler or my burner or both could be undersized. I'm just wondering what is the most efficient way to have a burner cycle on and off with a 20 degree differential. Is it best to have a burner that heats the water super fast or one that heats the water gradually but gets the job done? Which one would use the least amount of energy...
Thanks

I
not
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The ideal house according to a course I took at zero degrees outside the furnace should run 24 hours.
Regards,
Howard Epstein
houseslave wrote:

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...

furnace
I think that may depend on the area you live in. Not going to be very comfortable when it is 15 - 20 below and 20 MPH wind.
Walt Conner
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Wait 10, 20 ,50 yrs. You will be the ASS that experimented, and HD now wont warranty your PUSS,,,,, Wake UP It lasts thousands of years done right ,, Bozo, YOU a BOZO , BOZO
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