home A/C and R-22 - cost per lb

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Let's consider how it is that an old R22 system comes to need refrigerant. It's typically because a major component, like the compressor has burned out. Or maybe the evaporator or condensor has corroded and sprung a leak. Those repairs aren't cheap and are going to cost a major portion of what you could get new eqpt for. You'd have to be nuts to pour money into it regardless of the price of R22. Compressor shot? $1000 even with the price of R22 when it was cheap. At today's prices, it's $1200. In the words of Hillary Clinton
"What difference does it make?"

BS. New systems have SEERS of 14+. The typical R22 systems they are replacing have SEERS of 10. That is a huge difference in efficiency and operating cost. Now, I'm not saying everyone should run out and replace their system today. But if you have an old R22 system that needs a major repair, the answer is likely yes. And it could be yes even if the systems is still running fine. It depends on the climate, AC usage, and electricity cost.

Not in the refigerant, no. NEver said there was, only that there is an economic advantage in what it costs to operate that new R410 system compared to the typical 20 year old R22 system that needs a big infusion of R22 to keep it running.

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Ok I agree with everything you said IF it is a major failure. But many times it is just a minor leak. Mark
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My church has 7 zones of heating, and three mini splits. One of the zones has a slow leak some where. Since it's less than 50 pounds of refrigerant, it's much easier to add some refrigerant in the spring. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Ok I agree with everything you said IF it is a major failure. But many times it is just a minor leak. Mark
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On 5/18/2013 8:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Most refrigerant top off's are needed for leaks in the system and not compressor burnouts. stretching of the A-coil etc is quite common. causing microscopic leaks.
Or maybe the

Actually, That statement is pretty spot on. The new system will not last as long as the R22 system in most cases. But you will get more service calls for rebalancing the cooling gases.

Due ..of course to a much larger Condensing coil and A-coil system. For those of you that are not too bright....Check the size of that equipment. Also note that many furnaces are now only 33 inch tall in order to facilitate the overlarge Acoil

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That statement is spot on? The only reason a new system is more economical is because of the high cost of R22? The fact that a new system is typically SEER 14, while the old one it replaces is SEER 10, doesn't affect the economics? Good grief! It's operating cost will be substantially less.

Who cares exactly how it's achieved? The simple fact is that a cost effective R410A system is available that has a huge efficiency increase compared to the old system it replaced. Contrary to your nonsense, that is a huge economic advantage and the consumer doesn't care how exactly it's achieved.
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" snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net" used improper usenet message composition style by unnecessarily full-quoting:

He also talked about the R410 systems not having as long a service life as the r22 systems, and also leakage issues.

Someone faced with fixing a leak and re-charging an R22 system would be paying substantially less for that repair if the cost of R22 wasn't being made artificially higher due to politics.
The artificially high cost of R22 changes the economics and payback equation for the home owner and makes the high cost of replacing the entire system with R410 seem more comparable to fixing the existing R22 system.
No one is disputing the differences in operating costs between the two systems. You seem to be minimizing the upfront costs for tearing out the old system and installing a new one. The amortization schedule (or rate-of-payback) for these sorts of things are never what they claim to be.
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The "leakage issue" is a red herring. The new systems may not last as long as systems from 30 years ago, but I don't see that as being an R410 issue. Most residential eqpt one buys today doesn't typically last as long as the system from 30 years ago. A gas furnace, a dishwasher, for example and they don't use R410.

Oh please. We've been through that a dozen times. If you need a pound of R22 to top off a system, it doesn't make much difference in the cost. The cost of that R22 is $16. Even if it needs a whole system charge, it's not so high it's the end of the world. It's just that if a system needs a whole charge, it's probably because it's had some major failure. And in that case, most people with good sense, would decide that it's not worth fixing the 25 year old system and instead replace it with a new system that uses 40% less energy.

See above.

Actually, grumpy, pax, whatever his name is, well he is disputing it. And I'm not minimizing the costs of a new system. I just think that typically if a system needs a whole lot of R22, then it's very likely because it's had a major failure, eg the compressor is shot, the coils are shot, etc. In that case, it makes no sense to me to be bitching about the cost of R22, because even if R22 were 25% of the price it is today, it wouldn't make sense to do a major repair to that old system. And if it just needs a pound or two of R22, then it's still not that much and if they want to just add the R22, nothing stopping them from doing so.
In other words, I don't buy this nonsense that it's the high cost of R22 that's forcing people to needlessly convert to new eqpt.
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It's been a while since I needed to know this, but I remember that it's illegal to mix refrgerants. So, there is the artificially high cost of removing the (artificially expensive) R-22 before adding propane. Needs to be done with a EPA approved machine, done by a certified technician. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Which brings me to my question...
If you top off an R22 system with R290, do you have to remove all the R22 and replace it with R290 or can they be mixed?
Mark
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On 5/18/2013 6:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

what?????

Kind of a snotty reply to a well meaning response. So go F! yourself...

Obviously you are either not in the HVAC business or are just another hired gopher.

Wow! What aqn intelligent analogy.. ;-p

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be

You just did it again. Editing to completely change the context. Let's review, shall we?
I posted : "What answers exactly are "industries" giving that are false? Pretty much what I've heard is that the R410 systems are safe for the environment because of the R410 "
You edited the above to this:
"What answers exactly are "industries" giving that are false? Pretty much what I've heard is that the R410 systems are safe **************************************************** "
And then gave your response:
"Yes R410 is safer as to what defiantly not regarding pressures,..."
I said manufacturers said R410 is safe for the ENVIRONMENT and you make it sound like I just said R410 is safe and then start talking about safety with regard to pressure.

mes

Same to you pal. You have some kind of bug up your ass about R22 vs R410A. All I did was point out that the typical R410A system that you buy today to replace that old system has a much higher efficiency rating. Contrary to your nonsense, that is a big economic advantage to the consumer and the consumer doesn't care how exactly it's achieved, whether it has R410A, R22 or XYZ.

s

The you should be able to give us some credible industry sources that support your claim that there is a significant initial failure rate on compressors in new HVAC eqpt that has been properly installed. Links please....

ge

Thank you, because it is. Cars today are available that have much higher efficiency ratings than they did 20 years ago. Now you can argue about how those ratings are done, whether if a car is rated 28 MPG on the highway you actually get that specific number or not. But that the car uses less gas than the equivalent car it replaced from 20 years ago is a fact.
Simple question, do you deny that a new 14 SEER system saves a large amount in electricity that it uses compared to a 10 SEER system that it replaces? Yes or no?
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On Apr 26, 3:49 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

stry, if you you're lucky, you can work with your A/C tech and he'll sell i t to you wholesale if there's labor work involved in the sale. It's still g oing to run you $80/lb
$80 a pound wholesale? R22 is on Ebay from multiple sources for $16 lb. A whole 30 lb cylinder shipped is $480
and even a small system is gonna set you back $500. Hope this is a helpful message
Not so much
and I don't know who is regulating the costs of R22, but it's more than DOUBLED in the past year or so.
No one is regulating the costs. But the EPA has restricted it's use, banned it for new ACs, it's being phased out. But if you know about R22 and AC costs, I would think you'd know that.
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On Friday, April 26, 2013 3:49:18 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

stry, if you you're lucky, you can work with your A/C tech and he'll sell i t to you wholesale if there's labor work involved in the sale. It's still g oing to run you $80/lb and even a small system is gonna set you back $500. Hope this is a helpful message and I don't know who is regulating the costs of R22, but it's more than DOUBLED in the past year or so.
Richmond virginia-5/1/2013. $78 dollar service call and $90 per lb R22.
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Wholesale is about $500 per 30lb Cylinder now. It continues to grow every 3 months or so.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Any american who hasn't yet built a reinforced fence or bunker around their ground or roof-mounted AC unit, residential or commercial (or church!), monitored 24/7 with video -> now is the time.
The next wave of "american urban mining" is starting now, and it's being done by out-of-work hvac techs, prowling around in the middle of the night with empty propane tanks - harvesting the R-22 out of your soon-to-be non-working hvac systems...
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On 5/18/2013 7:08 AM, Home Guy wrote:

With you wandering our network... I can see why it is Code to install locks on the service valves. How much can you huff in a single night?

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PaxPerPoten wrote:

"wandering our network" ?
How much can I "huff" in a single night? You think I'm an HVAC tech?
Huff? Is that the lingo you use to describe the covert theft of AC refrigerant?
I'm a Canadian watching you americans flush yourselves down the toilet in many ways. Urban mining - stripping copper and wire, street and highway lights, gutters and siding, plumbing, entire hvac systems (and R22) from working systems, church rooftops and derelict homes.
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Huffing is not only refrigerant and it has nothing to do with stealing and nothing to do with HVAC guys

Explains a lot, eh
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today, $50 a pound, retail, R22, here. June 1, 2013 in East texas. 3 lbs low.
data point, x.
its a tax, you are paying, to uncle sam. its not for the fluid, not nearly. the EPA reduced supply , 45% , so supply can not reach demand and the upgra de is $5000. a no brainer.
more quotes (feds....) January 1, 2012, they did not have the authority to manufacture or import R -22.” 40% rise $$ , next week.
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On Jun 4, 8:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

rade is $5000.

It's not being paid to uncle sam. It's being paid to the suppliers, distributors. And most of that $50 is the markup of your local service guy who can buy it for $16 a lb. A 30 lb tank goes for ~$480 That's better than a 3X markup. So, I think some guys are using this as a way to hose customers.
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Very lucky that R22's price is stable from Jun 1013 caused by some replacement freon such as R22A, R422D...
www.SantaAir.com
On Tuesday, July 10, 2012 6:29:02 PM UTC-4, ps56k wrote:

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