HOA says no pickup trucks in driveway

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So, park it on the lawn instead.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Sat 20 Dec 2008 11:49:50a, ktos told us...

Been there. Not a problem. Would do it again.
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Too_Many_Tools wrote:

After living in condo hell, I agree. There are good HOA's especially for seniors, which probably rise to the level of "assisted living" - club houses with activities for all, pool, lawn games, playing cards or chess, shopping trips. But then one overweight dog can ruin the scheme.
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Or any number of gassy seniors. ;<)
TMT
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The title company will not close the transaction unless the new owner signs off on the CC&R's. The bank will not lend on the property unless the buyer signs compliance with the CC& R's and By-Laws of the HOA.
CC&R's are voluntary agreements, intended to keep up property values. Works very well, too. Nobody is forced to buy into a HO administered tract. Keeps out a lot of trucks which spell "low income" and "blue collar" and "rednecks" and cheap housing.
Who wants to live in a neighborhood were people cannot afford to drive passenger cars? :-)
--

Walter

< snipped-for-privacy@aol.com> wrote in message
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Who wants to live in a neighborhood where you have to?
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And who wants to live in a home where the next door neighbor has an RV on the lawn blocking the view of the purple house next to him with the five foot weeks in the front lawn? To each his own. If you want to live that way, don't buy in an HOA. But anyone that tells you they were not given the docs in advance is probably lying to you. Even at a closing you'd be asked if you were given a copy of the docs in advance, did your read and approve them.
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Hey,they are always free to move elsewhere.Views are not "rights". In most locales,RVs and such are prohibited from the FRONT part of the property.

Easy to say,but not so easy in practice.
--
Jim Yanik
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wrote:

It can also mean an area with a lot of entrepeneurs and building contractors and others who drive $60,000 pickup trucks.
In my neighbourhood there are quite a few skilled tradesmen and contractors, and a good many business owners who bring there shiny pickups and vans home every night.
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This varies from state to state, Walter. Some states, like Utah have very few laws regarding HOAs.
Steve
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On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 05:52:28 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

In many areas the only new homes you can buy are in deed restricted/HOA areas. There is a desire by cities to foist off on the property owners the "governing" of themselves so they city can escape as much financial involvement as possible. I don't think it's even possible in the larger cities in AZ to find a new home that isn't under an HOA. When we bought our home new about 20 years ago it was in one of the few subdivisions that did not have an HOA. There are "deed restrictions", but not too bad, but no real enforcement method. there are provisions for the property owners to form an HOA if they wish but if they chose to do so they cannot assess any dues. I've never understood why anyone would want an HOA. The typical dues are anywhere from $100 to $200 a month and I've heard of them as high as $600 a month. At $100 a month it's like adding around $20,000 to your mortgage. Why not just buy a house in a $20,000 better neighborhood.
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Again a good discussion.
In many areas, having a HOA will cause potential buyers to NOT buy into an area.
And in this housing market (and for the foreseeable future), that is the kiss of death to anyone who wants to sell their home.
TMT
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"Too_Many_Tools" wrote

That would be me. I would never willing buy into a community with an HOA. Far too subject to abuse by nitpicking neighbors with nothing better to do than watch my grass grow too much in 5 days to suit them before the weekly cutting.
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On Wed 17 Dec 2008 06:42:34a, HeyBub told us...

I see nothing wrong with buying a home in a deed restricted community. OTOH, buying into such a community is, as with many things, "buyer beware". If the covenants and by-laws were provided to the buyer prior to purchase, then it should have been clear to the buyer from the start what was permitted and what was not. AFAIC, the HOA had every right to enforce their rules if the homeowner had an opportunity to learn what they were before they purchased the property. Homeowners who want to flaunt the rules don't belong there.
To the other extreme, there are unregulated communities where yards are filled with crap, junk cars/trucks/trailers, homes are in disrepair, and the general tone of the neighborhood is unsavory. In many such communities, flagrant violations of city and county code are grossly overlooked by authorities. There is no recourse short of taking flight.
I have lived in both settings and I'm currently living in the latter. If I were able to, I would happily and immediately move into a restricted community with a well-organized HOA.
--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
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I once saw a condo communty that you couldn't have a pumpken out on holloween. But some body notaced it didn't saw you couldn't put a picture of one in your window.It looked like crap with pictures in ' every ' window of 50 condos. Jerry
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/1974Tryke
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Odd, I followed your link and then followed the link to read the full decision by the Judge.
My reading of the decision was pretty much different from your first link's reporting. The result of the decision may be the same, but there were sure a lot of other side issues. My hat is off to the judge who sorted out all side issues and came up with a fair and just decision.
From my reading of the decision: a contract approved by both sides is binding. Changing the contract later without the approval of both sides is a big No-No. HOA are not legal Government entities, HOA's exist as contracts between homeowner and the association. Enforcement of a contract must follow specific guidelines and procedural steps. Ignore the procedure steps to enforce compliance is also a No-No. Stepping over the line between being one party of a contract and perceiving the HOA is a government entity will result in nasty fines or court costs.
By the way, as the Judge pointed out, a SUV, and a Mini-Van are also "Trucks" by the manufactures for Federal safety regulations reasons, and thus the law regards SUV and Mini-Vans as trucks also. The HOA was selective in their enforcement.
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Thank you ever so much in your reporting in a much more accurate and in depth manner of the judge's decision. This gives me information I can take to several HOA people I know who are in this battle.
Steve
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wrote:

When house shopping I found a single (unatttached) house that fit my needs and more. But when I inquired about the pond in the backyard property, I was told that the entire community can use the pond. I guess the backyard is not private at all! I got a 14 page summary of HOA rules. After thinking about this, I decided that HOAs can be a very bad thing for a home owner. And then it makes it can be more difficult to sell (if and) when that time arrives.
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On Wed, 17 Dec 2008 07:42:34 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

storyid159&provider=top
I wanted to add my bit on Home Associations as I just finished a battle to get our street exempt from a newly forming Association. Here are some facts if you are interested. Keep in mind that these facts may change from state to state.
When you are buying a home the realtor pretty much tells you anything to get you to buy. We had a situation that the realtors were telling buyers that the HA was defunct. When closing came, There were unpaid dues and they had to be settled before the closing could continue. Most HA will enter a lean on a home for unpaid dues but will wait for the sale of the house to collect. Always check with a title company to make sure there is/ is not a HA involved with your home.
Most HA have to be registered with the Secretary of State. You can check online to see if they are current.
When fighting with a HA the one thing to remember is that very few homeowners attend meetings. They are too busy to attend most of the time. If your going to fight with them make sure you attend the meetings and then go visit your neighbors and get a proxy vote for those that will not be attending. We did this and the look on the association when voting was priceless. We stopped them dead and forced them (by vote) to do things our way.
You should be current on what the bylaws/covenants are. Especially the Operating laws of the Association.
Just remember that an association's main purpose is to protect the property value of your home. Most laws are guilded towards that purpose. Examples are: No trucks over a certain weight parked on properties, Decorations and house color options, Swimming pools, ect..
Personally, I dont care at all for associations. Anyone can pretty much obtain the same benefits by keeping a good relation with your neighbors.
For the most part, Once you buy a home in a HA you are locked in until you sell the home. Your pretty much not going to get out unless you find some circumstances like - The HA let their Sect. of State yearly paperwork slide and get dissolved by the state.
DF
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