Hinge cutouts

I can't for the life of me think of the proper name for them, but when installing a new door, what is the best way to carve out the spaces for the hinges in the door?
I've been using a hammer and chisel, it works but talk about hack work. I don't actually own a router, but is that the only real way to do it?
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Eigenvector wrote:

Mortices ______________
A router (and template) is lots easier...
--

dadiOH
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As said, a router and a template is the cat's meow. If you don't want to get a router (which you will use for a zillion things in the future you never thought of), you can get a butt hinge marker. Gives you a nice outline and depth to follow. Following the outline and the consistancy of the depth is at the mercy of the hammer and chisel holder.
Check out http://www.doityourself.com/stry/h2installhinge and maybe you'll pick up an "Ohhhhhhhh!!!!!" pointer :-)
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router and template are defintitely the easiest. However, a sharp chisel (you shouldn't need a hammer) will do just as good a job, although you will need a little practice. unless I'm doing alot of them, I use a standard chisel. Use the hinge itself and a untility knife to scribe the outline, then use the shisel to pare away the waste. Wuick, quiet, and clean.
-JD

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Eigenvector wrote:

If your mortice looks hacked then you either have a bad tecnique or need to sharpen that chisel.
I scribe the hinge outline with a very sharp exacto knife first.
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I highly recommend using a router with a hinge template.
I am using:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber3833
You'll only need the 1/4" bit from this set http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberF396
A hinge template (use a metal one like this, not a plastic one): I got mine off eBay
http://66.77.255.87/Images/VA%20Products/23457_VA/WEB_LG/23457_VA_lg.jpg
If you want to do the door latch part also, then you will need another template for that:
http://images.orgill.com/200x200/6117337.JPG
This last item comes with a router bit that you will need to use with the template so you don't destroy the plastic (which flexes, which is why I hate it). I have never seen a metal one of these, but if you are careful it works just fine.
Then take all these items and practice on some scrap wood until you get it right. there are some good instructions available how to do this in the internet (probably on hammerzone.com).
I have never and will never use a chisel to make a hing mortise. That method sucks by comparison. And I didn't spend much to do it the right way.
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Finding the keyboard operational Eigenvector entered:

Mortices were cut using hammer and chisels long before electricity was harnessed. Make sure you have a sharp chisel and go slow. Small cuts are better and easier to control then big ones. Practice on some scrap first. Bob
--
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On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 14:23:18 -0700, "Eigenvector"

Mortises. Either a chisel or router. A chisel takes more time (and skill) than a router. If I have a lot of mortises to cut I build a jig for the router.

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Eigenvector wrote:

oig some work a my son's place in VA last week I found a "kit" by (?) Irwin (?) at a Lowes in Norfolk. Had the twmplates for the hinges and a small bit with a rolling collar that could be powered by a cordless drill. Son didn't have a router, but did have the drill. The drill was an 18.something Sears Crapsman, but it worked for cutting 4 hinge mortices and two striker plate mortices, one in the door jamb and one in the door edge.
Whole thing worked out well.
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