higher water flow from well?

The house I just bought and moved into has a fancy 6-head shower setup in the master bath. But the water pressure seems completely insufficient to the task of running more than one head at a time... if I try to run more, they essentially dribble. I presume that the water pressure and volume throughput from the well is simply too low. Is there a product that might help? I was thinking of something along the lines of a holding tank that could be pressurized and provide the flowrate needed.
Clearly this is something of a lark, since who really needs a carwash-like setup for people... it is just a matter of having a useless bunch of showerheads irking me.
Regards, Teo
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Before you get too wound up, read the pressure gauge while someone uses the shower. Normal range would be something like 20-40 psi, or 30-50 psi (very round numbers).
Jim
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It depends. If it's a shower, you probably want hot water. That means that a pressure-tank would need to be BEFORE the water heater, otherwise, you'll fill the pressure tank with hot water, and it will then cool in that tank all day, and at night, you can take a nice cool six-head shower that turns warm just about when the pressure finally drops to zero...
You need sufficient pipe-diameter from the pressure tank, through the heater(s) and to the shower-heads.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you have a well, you already have a pressure tank*. If the pressure gauge on it is reading the range of 20/40 (weak), 30/50 (adequate), 40/60 (maximum recommended) then you have plumbing problems - blockages, restrictions or the like. Do the simple, cheap thing first if you have a filter - clean it.
* there are constant pressure pump set ups. I am not familiar with them but I believe they also run through a pressure tank.
Harry K
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I guess it can feel good having the spray all over.
What you really need to know is the volume required to feed them all, the volume the well pump and pressure tank that you have can produce. There may be restrictions in the line from small line size, clogged filters etc. I'd think you can get more than one to run under normal conditions. Check for a filter first; if so, replace the cartridge.
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I can appreciate a good shower, that's why when we moved to a place with a private well, I bought a booster pump. I have 80 psi now and the shower just blows you away unless you restrict it at the tap. They are neither prohibitively expensive nor particularly difficult to install assuming you have a large enough space to put it. I'm sure it would do even better if there were no 1/2'" fittings or restrictions of any kind, but enough pressure mutes the effect of all but the most severe of restrictions. I'd buy it again in a heartbeat, and when it wears out the replacement pump since I shouldn't need the little tank or flow switch will be about $150.
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Like this: http://www.daveyusa.com/hsinfo.html
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On 26 Sep 2006 07:33:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Most definitely a pressure tank would help. Of course you must assure that the water lines are adequate size and there are no constricitons.
I put in a drip irrigation system once and ended up having to know exactly how much every single faucet on the whole place used in gpm (gallons per minute). My shallow well had to ration out it work load to do the numerous tasks needed with lots of timers. God, I love city water.
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Along with everyone's advice of checking pressure and clogged pipes and filters, etc. You also need to know how much your well can produce. We can run the front sprinklers for 30 or so minutes and we are out of water.
You can get a second or larger Pressure Tank, which will store some water and hold your pressure longer.
If your well is not producing that much water, then you would need a Storage Tank (non-pressurized) and then a booster pump to pressurize the system from the storage tank.
We are going with the Storage Tank and the 2nd Pressure Tank as we are now feeding 2 houses off the same well.
Scott<-

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I was raised with a windmill and attest to the fact that you need a large storage tank for those too.
Note: A pressure tank is a 'storage' tank.
On Tue, 26 Sep 2006 18:20:42 GMT, "Scott Townsend"

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