High water usage?

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Jim wrote:

I'm not sure it's worth that much.
All meters are at the property line where I live. Leaks cost you big time.
Turn off everything that uses water or the main water valve in the house. Take a couple readings a few hours apart. if any water is used, a leak is likely. Looking for wet spots is kind of pointless.
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Bob F wrote:

I could add - the pipe I replaced last summer was leaking right where it went through the concrete basement wall. Apparently the concrete is hard on galvanized pipe.
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Hello Bob...again the OP could have provided us with that knowledge as to the LOCATION of the meter. I am in Canada and we have our water meter located inside the home .....so 'Where you live" is a large thing that a lot of posters forget to explain..."Where you live" is not the normalicy for everyone... I at least took the time to give variable situations as to where the water meter could be located...not just "where I live"... regards... Jim

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Jim wrote:

Not always. My water meter is near the curb. It's fifty or more feet before the line gets to the house.
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wrote:

This is probably climate dependent -- where it freezes the pipes have to be at least 4-6 feet below ground (sometimes more), and the meter is usually located in a basement or above-ground heated space (I remember a wire going to a remote read point outside the house in Connecticut).
Here in central CA where it doesn't freeze, our meter is under a cover next to the street, and the main supply pipe comes out of the ground and goes into the side of the house. That wouldn't last long in the Northeast!
Josh
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Here in Denver, my meter is outside near the curb. The main water line is approx. 4 feet deep, but the meter is right below ground level. They have a vertical input line to the meter and the another vertical pipe for output from the meter that drops down about 4 feet, which then runs to the house. I guess they design the meter not to freeze.
Rob
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My meter has a little spinner on it . You dont have to be using hardly any water at all to see it move. Turn off everything in the house and see if it still moves
Jimmie
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On Fri, 8 Jan 2010 16:28:35 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE

Same here. A former neighbor (single person household) had a big jump in his bill. The street meter dial (red needle) was spinning to beat the band. The supply line was broken from the street to the house, because of tree roots.
No obvious water at the surface or wet spots. He had the plumber put in a new line @ $75.00 per hour.
The tree was really enjoying the water...
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Oren wrote:

The tree was thirsty and had a water problem, all water addicts will lie, cheat and steal to get their water fix. 8-)
TDD
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wrote:

Sounds like Texas or Florida or Alabama - or Zambia
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Or Seattle.
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wrote:

Especially, Las Vegas!
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Where is the meter located? Do you have a shutoff for the main near or within the meter?
For instance, there can be a shutoff right at the meter which may be curbside and then a type of shutoff within the house.
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wrote:

A curbside meter wouldn't last 2 hours here in January - or Feburary, or most of march , a good part of april, and most of December.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

I know what you mean from living in VT just shy of the Ca border. Funny how in March or April when you got a few unusually warm days back to back suddenly the streets would start exploding.
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On Fri, 08 Jan 2010 20:38:57 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Works fine here. Of course it is down about 2.5 feet below ground. When you live over 100 feet off the road, it makes more sense to make the water line yours instead of the utility's.
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In a two-person household where I also wash a lot of fabric as part of my business, we use less than 25,000 gallons a year. Don't know how much less, we always pay the $40 minimum yearly fee. So...I'm guessing you have a leak.
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Is your water meter at the curb, or in the cellar?
One Quick N Simple test for water leak, is to put food coloring in the toilet tanks. If the food coloring goes into the bowl (without being flushed) you have a leaky toilet. Leaky toilets are both common, and use a LOT of water.
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Just checked our usage for 35 days. 2450 gallons. No lawn watering at this time of year. Lots of showers and clothes washing and dish washer use is 3 loads every 2 days. Also use a osmosis filter for drinking and cooking water and as much goes down the drain as to the quantity that is kept. WW
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A few more details might be helpful
number of people in household landscape watering? year 'round? seasonal? actual usage history for the last year?
a 93 day billing period?
177 gallons per day is easy to use depending on life style & number of occupants
Of course all 177 gpd is not "leakage" but even if it was ALL leakage that's only 1/8 of a gallon per minute, A leaky toilet flapper / pig nose could easily waste a large fraction of that amount.
If you have an outside leak, depending on soil & weather conditions....you might never see the leak or you could get a soggy spot.
cheers Bob
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