High-Speed Connection Questions

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Verizon broadband is now available here, but the web site doesn't answer whether it's possible to have broadband and dial-up simultaneously on the same PC. I'd like to retain a cheap dial-up to use as a back-up ISP connection.
Is this possible when there's only one phone jack in the room?
Also, is it a hassle to self-install the broadband modem and filters? Thx.
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wrote:

Assuming you have a computer with a phone-line based modem there shouldn't be any problem. If you can use broadband and still take voice phone calls at the same time, there should be no problem from that standpoint. By simultaneously I am assuming that you mean on the same machine and not at the same time. I'll leave it to the others as to whether it is possible for the computer to get information from two different modems at the same time. That would be the limiting factor, probably.

Yeah. You would have to unplug the telephone and plug in the phone modem. It is usually a good idea to disconnect call irritating when using the modem, although some areas may have ways around that.

connection at the same time. Whole operation took about 20 minutes or so. First and only one, so you can judge your experience against mine. (g)
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wrote:

You really wouldn't - DSL requires a filter - one line going to the DSL modem, another line going to the analog devices. So you could leave them all hooked up at the same time.
--
To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.

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I was talking using the phone modem and phone at the same time. I answered one question and you answered the one he was probably asking (g).
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John wrote:

I do it with Comcast. I assume Verizon, like Comcast will set up modem to first computer and either charge extra or you set up wireless network yourself. I think Verizon makes you use their modems but with Comcast you can buy your own. I understand Verizon may want to strip the copper connections from your house - I would not allow this myself.
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It;s certainly possible to keep a modem connection available for backup. But from a practical standpoint, it's just about useless. Broadband is very reliable, way above dial up. And once you experience the speed, you won't want to screw around with dial up at all. If you have an account at some dial up provider for mail, etc, you can almost always get access to that too, via broadband. Even when traveling now, I never use dial up, every hotel I've been in the last several years now has broadband.
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On Jul 19, 12:04pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You are right, of course. I kept dial up along with high speed for 6-7 months because I had paid isp for one year. I did this deliberately because I wanted to keep old web pages on isp for business consulting purposes while transitioning to new site. During this whole period I probably spent less than an hour on dial up as Comcast was down.
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I don't know about Verizon, but some providers will have a local dial up number you can use if the dsl or cable connection goes down. If not and you want a seperate dialup connection there will not be a problem. If you had two computers, you could probably use both at the same time on differant providers.
The modem is no problem. It will have a telephone type cord you plug in and another that will plug into the usb or eithernet port on your computer.
There are two ways to install the filters. The simplest is the ones that are about 2 inches square and have about 6 inches of cable on them. They will plug in between each phone and the phone line. The line going to the modem will not have a filter in it.
The other way is to run a line from your computer modem to where the phone line comes into the house, Then you install one filter in line that goes to all the phones in the house.
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Yes, you can have both, but you'll probably never use the dial up. I don't know about Verizon, but with ATT you get both for the same price. If you have DSL you can still use dial up.
As for the install, if you can plug in a cord you can do the install. The phones in the house have to get plugged into a filter, then the filter into the jack. You can use a splitter on the jack the computer is hooked up to so both the phone and DSL are plugged in, and if you want, get a triple to plug in the computer modem at the same time. I do that so I can fax from the computer.
The computer must have a network card. Most all new ones do since the majority will be used on either DSL or Cable broadband. . Once you make the change, you'll never want to use dial up again.
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On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 14:11:35 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.home (John) wrote:

I still use my AOL dial up when broadband is down. It happens occasionally with Embarq DSL,. Coimcast was down at least once a week. That is why I canceled them. If you are looking at text groups like this one, there is not any real difference between dial up and broadband. It is really only evident when you get to the graphics boated web sites.
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On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 13:38:51 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

There is little difference once connected. There is a difference when you consider connection time and inconvenience (dial-up interferes with phone use).
When I first got broadband (and so, no experience with it), I didn't consider the speed increase nearly as important as the connection being "always on".
Of course, it is nice to be able to download video. BTW, I know someone (limited to dial-up, for financial reasons) who wishes she could watch YouTube.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 18:08:27 -0500, Mark Lloyd

You can watch YouTube on dial-up. I did. I didn't do it as much as I do now with DSL, but I could have.
You go to the page, and when it starts dl'ing, you click Pause. It will still dl the file. Do something else online or not, and after it finishes, click Play, and it will play fine, straight out of the ram or HD. You can replay it too, until you close the tab or go to another video.
There are separate indicators on the same line that show how the dl'ing is doing and how far you have played. There's a button to click that restarts the Play at the beginning.
Some other video pages are the same way, even if they don't have separate indicators.

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wrote:

Thanks for the suggestion. I'll mention it to my friend.
--
Mark Lloyd
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John wrote:

Heh! You want backup?
Get cable AND DSL.
We use cable (5Mbps)* primarily and DSL (768Kbps) as a backup. Well, not really. Our two VoIP lines travel over the DSL - that way we can tell if the DSL goes down. When it does, we plug the VoIP modem into the cable line.
Or vice-versa.
As for the DSL filters (there are none for cable): The trunk comes in and goes to a splitter-filter. Two outputs from the splitter, one to the DSL modem (and from there to the computer) and the other to your regular telephones.
Yes, you can have DSL and dial-up on the same computer - using only one at a time obviously. Analog dial-up travels over the same lines as voice, much like a fax machine. DSL gets split off to circuits completely separate from analog stuff.
--------- * Just tested: 5893Kbps down, 915Kbps up
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Verizon no longer provides free dial-up when you get DSL, so you would need to pay for it separately. Note that Verizon no longer carries the alt.hierarchy in Usenet, so you would have to go to a third party news provider in order to read alt.home.repair.
--
Peace,
BobJ



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On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 15:44:53 -0400, "Marilyn & Bob"
[snip]

Of course it could be aioe.org (completely free, but no binaries).
--
Mark Lloyd
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On Sun, 20 Jul 2008 14:06:29 -0400, "Marilyn & Bob"

Including 3com, adobe, alabama, alive, aol, belsouth, borland, clari!!, corel, and all those national groups, aus, be, bermuda, chile, es, jp, il, uk (Oh, that's what regional refers to) and many others.
Incuding microsoft! I use them a lot too. There on the Erols server, no need to use the microsoft server.
That's way more than half of all ngs, including way more than half of what I use.
That's terrible.
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On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 14:11:35 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.home (John) wrote:

I wanted both too, but after a short while I was so spoiled by high speed that I would rather wait until it's working again than do whatever would be necessary in the computer. Of course email and newsgroups work just as well in dial-up, but I do enough web stuff.
One thing VErizon neglected to tell me, that cost me about a week, is that the kit they send you has no network card, and you have to arrange your own network port. Now the card was less than 10 dollars on ebay INCLUDING shipping, but I would have gotten it in advance if I'd known. (They extended my start up date to make up for it.)
I'd just plan on setting up dial-up when there is a long outage.
BTW, the Verizon kit included 3 tubular filters and one for wall phones. The first tubular filter I tried didn't work, lots of interference in the phone; and I don't have a wall phone but someone I know does, and their phone now wobbles a lot. I woudl just use a tubular filter with a wall phone, in their case and probably others.
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wrote:

I have cable internet now, but had everything already setup and just needed to move an ethernet cable and renew the address (DHCP). Of course that was after several hours of calls to ***** "customer service representatives" and a technician visit because they's lied to me about what modem I needed.
--
Mark Lloyd
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On Sun 20 Jul 2008 02:34:30a, mm told us...

Verizon proably neglected to tell you this because most PCs are sold already containing a NIC (network interface card).

--
Wayne Boatwright
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