High Cost of Keeping Hot Tub Ready To Go

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It doesn't matter what it is that you're keeping warm. Air, Bricks, water, Ectoplasm. It always takes more energy to keep it warm than it does to let it cool to ambient, and then warm it back up. Depending on other factors, (mostly insulation) it may not take *MUCH* more, but it always takes more.
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Right, I don't deny that. My point is that the difference in cost is not a whole lot, and I don't have to wait for my spa to get up to temperature if I get inspired at some crazy hour to get into it (an issue in my cold climate, in particular).
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You are correct. It will not save "much" money. However, if I know I'm not going to use the spa for a week or more, I turn the thermostat to it's lowest setting. That's not much of a bother, and it does save a little energy. Turning the tub up and down on a daily schedule would not be worth the effort involved. The economy mode is really most useful for those who only use their tub once or twice a week or even less. I know people who use their tub only a few times a month. Others use it more than once a day.
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On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 22:05:33 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

Most ARE! They call it "economy mode". Essentially it's a setback scheme to save energy.

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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 11:45:09 GMT, Mys Terry

Mine has that feature, but it is not a temperature setback. It only determines when to run the heater, not what temperature to set it back to. On my house setback thermostat I set it for 65 degrees at night, then 72 degrees in the morning. That's a setback thermostat.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 06:24:13 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

Same as, same as. The end result is exactly the same thing. Lower average temp resulting in energy savings. Call it whatever pleases you.
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Doesn't matter whose words. They're only true if the electricity you use to heat the pool is more expensive than the electricity you use to keep it hot.
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Dick wrote:

Look Dick, I've got 30 years + experience as a mechincal engineer........energy calcs are part of the biz. Plus I've got 10 years + owning a spa.
Do whatever you want to do with your spa, it's a free country
but lowering the temp of any heated "space" will result in energy savings
As for the "a quote from one of the largest spa dealers" "It is recommended to maintain your water temperature on a consistent daily basis during the winter."
think what their motivation is.......they want maximum comfort & usage so you have good things to say about spa ownership, so they will have you touting their product.
cheers Bob
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Unless your energy cost varies by time, it's not possible for that to occur. (We have this discussion about water heaters on a regular basis).

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It uses the 50 amp 220 volt line. It'll be a fun experiment to see how long it takes to go from 80 to 104 and other permutations. Thnaks for the timer tips.
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I'd be skeptical that the thermal insulating blankets that you can float on top of the water add much in the way of energy savings. The spa should already have 3-4 inchs worth of insulation in the cover. I find it hard to believe that one of these thin blankets that floats on top of the water adds much in the way of energy savings, unless there is something I'm missing about the way they are supposed to work.
I see people here claiming they do work, but I don't see how you would ever know, since spa electric is bundled in with everything else. Unless you put a meter on it and monitored it for many days with similar weather/temps, you'd never know.
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On 7 Mar 2006 10:48:22 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

They are pretty effective for the same reason that storm windows are effective. Another example is the similar bubble mats sold for picnic coolers. I use one of those in my boat's icebox, and it keeps ice for almost twice as many days as without. It's not a minor difference. Spa covers are not airtight where they meet the top rim of the tub. The hinged area down the center is less well insulated than the rest. I can tell this by how the snow melts on the cover. It always melts over the hinge first.
All that said, I stopped using a floating mat because it was a pain in the ass to deal with. My medium sized spa costs about $30 a month to operate. You can either drive yourself crazy trying to save $5 a month, or you can simply decide if you really want a spa or not. At $30 a month, I find it worth having. Think about some of the other things you spend money on and this becomes a bargain. You could save money by remembering to turn off the lights when you leave a room. In my kitchen, I have a 25 watt lamp near the fridge that can be left on for the evening, rather than leaving 8 75 watt halogens blasting. It's enough light to get around and pour yourself a drink. Don't run the dishwasher, washing machine or clothes dryer unless they are full. If your car is paid for, drop the collision insurance. And so on...
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We set our hot tub at 85. It takes a couple hours to raise the temperature to 102. I once figured it saved us at least a couple dollars per day.
g
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wrote:

Hey Bryan
I got a question for you. I have never had or even used a hot tub, so this question lingers in my head.
You got the hot tub outdoors. Winter or Summer you use it. To use it, you got to go outdoors to get in, which means removing the cover (which I am sure takes some time). You crawl into it and it's nice and warm. OK..... So far this all makes sense..... Except for one thing.... You obviously take your clothes off, and I would take a guess that you wear some swimming gear at least during the day when neighbors can see you.
Here comes the confusing part. (especially in winter) You have to walk outdoors practically naked. The outdoor temperature is below zero. That alone sounds more than I'd want to deal with. Then when you get out of that thing, you are soaking wet, and standing in sub-zero weather almost naked. Even if it only takes 3 seconds to get into the house, that sounds horrible.... And that dont take into account how and when you put the cover back on that thing.
Why would ANYONE put one of these things OUTDOORS in a climate that gets cold in winter? The tub itself might be wonderful, but getting in and out of it in winter sounds horrible.
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The worst part is the wet swim trunks; they do get cold fast. Walking 15 feet to the tub with dry swim trunks is no problem at all. The hot tub cover is on a hinge so it's also no problem at all. Where I live the temperature range is low 30's and up for winter nights, so you'll have to ask someone else about the subzero scenario.
Personally I don't get into the tub very often during daylight hours. For me it's more of a nighttime activity; sitting under the stars listening to the breeze blowing through the trees and just relaxing in a hot tub is very enjoyable.
The outdoor hot tub concept is one you'll have to experience for yourself to understand; maybe you'll like it, maybe you won't.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 14:41:39 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@dont.send.any.com wrote:

Actually, winter is more enjoyable than summer. I have been in indoor hottubs, and they were uniformly awful.
The cold really isn't a factor until it gets down around 5F. I go out and open the tub ahead of time. Then it's a few seconds in the cold with the reward at the end of slipping into that wonderful bubbling hot water. After being in there for 20 minutes or so, you are heated up enough that you don't really feel the cold when you get out. We have a big hill off to one side, and my wife and her friends like to periodically jump out of the tub and roll down the hill in the snow naked. It's a riot, especially when one of them goes off course and ends up stuck under a shrub.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 14:41:39 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@dont.send.any.com wrote:

For many people, it is indeed horrible, but not for me and certain of my friends in western New York, where I really enjoy using the spa in 20F temps with snow coming down. I was smart enough to put the spa not too far away from the back door (about 15 ft.), so I can sprint outside, plug in the party light strings (to fool the motion detector light into staying off), lift off the spa cover, drape my towel over a nearby deck chair, and leap into the warm water. I stay in my spa an average of an hour at a time, and by the end, I'm pretty thoroughly warmed up so by the time I need to get out, my internal core temperature is radiant enough that I don't feel the outside air temp or the snow too severely.
It's really about the contrast, especially with fresh snow on the ground, the perfect time to get out of the spa after warming up thoroughly and then lying down on some clean fresh cold snow for the rush (not recommended for people with heart conditions) and then leaping back into the spa. This is what Scandinavians do, all the time!
I hate using my spa in the summer. What's the point? There's no temperature contrast, no thrill, no quickening of the senses.
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wrote:

Come to think of it, we don't have any snow where I live, but when we visit the ski resort for vacation, the kids love to roll around in the snow after warming up in the tub.
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Nothing is greater than sitting in a hot tub in the freezing cold as snow flakes land on your face and feel so refreshing....yah, it's really cold going out and getting in the tub at first, but after about 5 mins. when your body temp has risen, you don't feel the cold anymore, so when it's time to get out, it's no big deal..personally I wouldn't lay in the snow afterward, but I can say from experience, an outdoor hot tub is awesome!!! C in NY
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