High Cost of Keeping Hot Tub Ready To Go

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On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 13:53:11 GMT, Mys Terry

Our Jacuzzi spa has an Economy setting in addition to the Standard setting. In Economy, the heater only runs when the pump is on. I.E. only during the filter cycles. When we get in it, and turn the pump on, the heater runs as needed. The heater never runs other than those two conditions. If we set it to Standard, the heater would run throughout the day to maintain the set temperature.
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On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 07:35:51 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

That's a pretty standard feature these days.
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wrote:

I keep my spa set for 102F. It was running about twice this which still isnt that bad. This is because the point where the temp probe is placed on the plumbing isnt insulated and gets cold a lot quicker than the rest of the hot tub. A little fibergalss insulation and tie wraps fixed that. I've found that leaving a maintenance cover off can cause excessive cycling of the heater also. Mine will run for about ten minutes even though the temp came up almost instantly once the pump starts. I insulated the maint panel in front of the pack and will do the rest of them this spring when I rebuild the outside of the hot tub replacing the cheap pine with composite material. I wish the pump wasn't located so close to the temp probe and heater. This way I could insulate them better without worrying about the motor overheating.
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Bryan wrote:

lettingthe spa cool down & then reheating ALWAYS saves money because the cooler the spa is, the less heat lost to the environment
In the extreme, if you let it get stone cold (~65F) for a week, you'll save a weeks worth of heating. It will only take a day to bring it back up. Turning the heater off saves money, costs "convenience"
cheers Bob
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That doesn't compute for me. Our heater runs maybe one hour per day by letting it bring back the degree or two it loses between filter cycles. That's 7 hours vs 24 hours using your method.
Dick
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Dick wrote:

sorry it "doesn't compute for you"
that's the whole concept of setback thermostats for water heaters & furnaces.
If you don't believe it search back through the group & take a look the water heater discussions
how did you get 7 hours vs 24 hours w/ "my method", I was just giving some estiamtes. it all depends on the insulating propertires of the spa & the ambient environmental conditions.
a cooler spa loses less heat to the environment, it's that simple
"catching up" takes no more energy than would have otherwise been used...............
by your logic...... turning the spa off for a wmonth & then reaheating for a one day use would take more energy than keeping it heated for a month?
I don't think so
cheers Bob
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By your logic, you could leave the spa off for a year and save all kinds of money. I'm assuming it will be used.
It's all a matter of kilowatt hours vs time. How much time you are running the heater to maintain the temperature needed for normal use of the spa. If setback thermostats were effective with spas, they would be equipped with them. The fact that they are not tells you something.
Here's a quote from one of the largest spa dealers in the U.S. "According to the electric company, it costs less to maintain the temperature in a controlled environment than it does to let it get very cold and then boost the heat up on demand. Most outside spas provide the ideal controlled environment. Don't let your spa water get cold and then crank the heat up right before you use it. Aside from running the risk of a freeze up, this method of heating will cost you a tremendous amount of money in energy bills. It is recommended to maintain your water temperature on a consistent daily basis during the winter."
Not my words, but theirs.
Dick
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On Tue, 07 Mar 2006 22:05:33 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

Whose words? What spa dealer? What brand of spa?
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 11:41:16 GMT, Mys Terry

http://poolandspa.com . You can do the research.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 06:28:19 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

In other words, you made the whole thing up. That's what I figured.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 13:59:32 GMT, Mys Terry

I take it you are too lazy to read the information.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 11:46:08 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

You haven't supplied any verifiable information. You made up a bunch of nonsense, and nobody is buying what you are selling. In other words, either put up, or do your reputation a favor and shut up.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 19:05:05 GMT, Mys Terry

You are so full of crap I don't know why I waste my time trying to educate you. On the outside chance that you aren't a troll who wants to just argue for the sake of argument, here is the web page that you were too lazy to look up. I am assuming you know how to access a web page. Maybe not. http://www.poolandspa.com/page91.htm .
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 14:57:31 -0700, Dick <LeadWinger> wrote:

Duck,
I don't care who you claim told you what. They are simply wrong.
Just because someone works at a spa dealership, doesn't mean they know anything about physics. It may even increase the odds that they don't. They probably don't fully understand how an electric motor works, either. The issue here comes down to physics. Sales people generally just parrot things they think they heard somewhere, or that the boss told them.
Best of luck to you.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 11:41:16 GMT, Mys Terry

I don't know Dick's dealer or spa brand, but this is what I also was told by my dealer, Clearwater Pool and Spa in Rochester, New York, and I'm running a Beachcomber spa. I just leave my spa at 100F all the time, with the filter pump cycling 2x daily, and it's working fine, not costing me much for a couple of reasons: it's insulated on all five sides of the shell (plus the cover is pretty good), and the spa is located on the south side of the house, so it gets all available sun, helping to maintain the temperature. This spa is so good at retaining heat that I've even turned off the filter pump and seen only a 2 or 3 degree temperature drop over a week in above freezing temperatures. So keeping it at 100F really is easier on the machine and doesn't cost much for the convenience.
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Just for openers, the fantasy quote given by Dick says that outdoors is a "controlled environment". He could start by explaining that one! What a whopper!
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 19:07:48 GMT, Mys Terry

[my stuff cut entirely]

Let's have a reading comprehension review. In fact, I'll retype Dick's sentence: Most outside spas provide the ideal controlled environment. He did NOT say "outdoors is a 'controlled environment.'" The sentence in question clearly states that outdoor hot tubs are equipped to control their environments, and you probably know that they do this by using superior insulation material in product design intended to maximize environmental stability.
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You cut too much. He started out quoting something from an imaginary power company that is out of context and then tried to connect it to hot tubs. I'm SURE the power company was not talking about hot tubs. They were talking about the fact that if you let a building go completely cold, you not only have to reheat the air, but you have to reheat the walls, floors, bricks, toilets, and other mass. Not remotely equivelent to a hot tub. The mass in a hot tub is almost entirely the water.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 19:50:35 GMT, Mys Terry

You're right, and here's what one power company, BC Hydro, says about the cost to heat a spa:
http://www.bchydro.com/rx_files/pshome/pshome1601.pdf
Right on the first page, last sentence, it says that a well insulated spa with a good cover costs little extra to keep heated at the higher temperature. This .pdf dates from May 2005, so it's fairly recent.
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Thank you.
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