Hey electricians...

Friend of mine just had 400 AMP 3 phase put in his shop. It's 208 volts. He has a machine that says 230 Volts on the name plate. The machine has an autoformer in it for 208 or 230 volts. (The machine is actually 400 volts, it's from Italy, the autoformer bumps the input to 400 volts to run it.) The city inspector says he has to have the name plate re-stamped to read 208 volts since that's what is actually connected to it. Anyone ever hear of this?
Al
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Al,
So, what's the problem? Remove the tag, carefully hammer out the old stamp, or fill the old stamp with solder, restamp with the new voltage, and reattach. Local laws are different in different locales. This is an easy fix which will satisfy the local inspector.
Dave M.
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Absolutely correct.
The rated input should be clearly & permanently marked on it. Someone might connect it to 400V otherwise...

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wrote:

How about 208/230V?

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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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I don't know your city code, but that's a strange requirement. What is the purpose of this label?
If there is a 110-120V fan in the shop, would your friend have to measure the line voltage (let's say it is 118V) and relable the fan 118V? What if the voltage drops to 116V during heavy load?
Maybe easier to just attach a voltmeter to each equipment.
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I have seen equipment labeled "208/230V".
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Mark Lloyd
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John wrote:

The requirement is that all electrical equipment be used in accordance with it's listing and labeling. In US practice a motor labeled with a 230 nominal voltage may be used on any voltage with a nominal value of 220 to 240 volts. As you can see the 208 volts being applied to this load is outside the acceptable range of voltages for a 230 volt motor. Motors intended to be operated at 208 volts must be listed for that service. It is very common to have motors labeled 208/230 volts if they are suitable for use at both nominal voltage levels. Many such motors are provided with winding taps to allow for the two separate operating voltages. IN the case of a machine that is listed to run at 230 volts the remedy that is normally applied is to supply it from a properly sized boost transformer that will boost the 208 supply to 230 volts. Alternatively the manufacturer may be willing to exchange the supplied transformer and label for one matched to the 208 supply.
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Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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