Here's one for the telephone guys

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you talk about disconnecting all the phones. the problem you describe is common if you exceed the "ringer equivalence" allowed by your phone line. the max may be 5.0 on most telephone offices, but may be as low as 3.0 if you are connected to a remote terminal (common on lines also providing a dsl connection).
you get the total by adding all the RE's shown on the base of the phones (typical is 1.0 per phone) connected to the line. counts even if the ringer is set to low or off!
also, bad protector and wet cable will cause "pre-mature ring trip" (the phone office thought the line was answered). The phone company should be able to do a line test for ring voltage breakdown from their end. Repair tech should have a tester to make the same test in the field.
-larry / dallas
Charlie Bress wrote:

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Not anymore, I think. Check your phones. They were 1.0 when the phones used a pretty big coil to move a real clapper and ring a real bell. You know, the 50's, the phones that never broke.
I still use one in the basement, but I disconnected the bell so I wouldn't have to worry about exceeding the maximum REN.

True in many/most cases,, unless you go inside and disconnect the bell. But peizo-electric buzzers etc. are low enough that it isn't worth doing this.

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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 18:30:34 -0500, "Charlie Bress"

It's a very good idea. Have you got a better one? In fact it turns proving a negative into illustrating a positive.

Then it's the phone company's problem, assuming you did this right.
They suggest this test as the second test because it's harder for a lot of people to do, and not everyone has a network connector on their house. Here, they will install one for free if you ask. Of course they do that at least in part so that they can have less service calls to make, but given the way repairs are billed or not billed, it'ss in the customer'sr interest too.

If you got the call on the previously broken line, then it was fixed.

Now you are describing a different problem. Have you informed the telco of these details of the problem?
Now you have to redo the test they gave you. Disconnect the house from the network and plug a phone into the now-empty jack. Since you have a cell phone, you can do the whole test yourself. Call your house with the cell phone.

How many phones do you have, and how many of them are more than 20 years old?

I thought you said this was a bad plan!

What is the REN on the bottom of each phone? (Ringer equivalency number, where 1 = the reciprocal of the resistance of a black 1950's/60's dial phone.
That is the total REN is the sum of the individual RENs.

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