Here are the pics I promised. Range hood install in small deli.

I posted earlier in the week with a lot of stupid questions concerning the installation of a range hood in a small deli. Here is a link to that post: http://groups.google.com/group/alt.home.repair/browse_frm/thread/b31e770738823853/37aeb708835e6137?lnk=st&q=&rnum=3&hl=en#37aeb708835e6137
I promised RicodJour that I would post pics so here they are. I guess you could call these the "before" pics since the project hasn't actually started yet. I don't think these pics will be very interesting to anyone but since I promised, here they are. http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/lwhaley22000/album?.dir=/45bb&.src=ph
pic12 - Here is a pic of the front of the store just so you know what a cute little place it is. The side walls are stucco as you can see. I said before that they were brick. Greg seem to think that we can go though the wall to vent the hood, but I am doubtful. pic13 - a pic of the cool mural on the side of the building. Bemidji is on a lake and this mural depicts that. pic14 - gives proper credit for the mural. pic15 - This view from the rear of the building shows how litte space there really is between the co-op and the neighboring building. I don't see any way it will be possible to install a vent on this wall. I haven't been up on the roof but since the co-op is a smaller building I doubt if it matters. This seems to indicate that the vent will have to go up on the roof which appears to be flat. This will be bigger challenge than going though a wall. pic16 - this is a shot of the teenie little stove they use a few hours each day. My source says that the dimension of the hood needs to be at least 3 inches larger than the size of the cooking surface. this seems to indicate that a only a rather small hood will be neccessary, barring any upgrade. pic17 - from inside the kitchen facing the wall where they supposedly want the stove to be relocated. shows both the old location and the new location. pic18 - show the upper wall and the ceiling. You can see that there is some crappy paneling covering the wall and ceiling. pic19 - view that the customer sees when shopping at the deli.
Question: What sort of problems will I have if I try to put this vent hole through the ceiling? Until I do go up on the roof I won't know for sure but I'm guessing that this roof has coarse gravel over a rubber membrane.
Lawrence
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Been following this thread but have not posted till now. I have a food service background but have been away from it for 20 years. We had multiple locations and the rules were different in all of them. In all cases the local rules apply.
I would suggest you avoid the roof if at all possible. Not saying you aren't, but even professionally installed units tend to have problems. They always leak. And in a building that age no telling what you might encounter.
Based on the images it doesn't look like "big city standards" are being enforced since I see residential equipment in a commercial location. I suspect you will be able to get away with installing a better grade residential unit. A "big city" install would require a commercial unit and make up air with built in fire extinguishers installed by a certified installer.
Go through the wall with whatever duct is required for the hood you install. The motor as a remote mount will greatly reduce the noise if that is an option. I doubt make-up air will be required.
If I were you I would go with your original plan to ask the inspector what you need to do and never offer any suggestions. The absolute minimum will be a safe install unless they start frying a bunch of stuff on that stove top.
Colbyt
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Thanks to Colbyt for the reply.

They always leak. And in a building that age no telling what you might encounter.
You are right to say the roof is worth avoiding and this may be why Greg says he wants to go through the wall. If it becomes absolutely necessary to go through the roof then I may not feel confident taking the job cause when it leaks I will look like a jerk. The problem as I currently see it is that there does not seem to be enough room outside to go through the wall . The neighboring building is almost flush to the co-op. There may be about 12 inches between them. I will get permission to go up on the roof and check it out in more detail. I will also post pics from the roof when they are available. Don't you think it would be necessary to access the wall from the outside in order to fit the end cap to the flue?
He also said: Based on the images it doesn't look like "big city standards" are being enforced since I see residential equipment in a commercial location. I
suspect you will be able to get away with installing a better grade residential unit. A "big city" install would require a commercial unit and make up air with built in fire extinguishers installed by a certified installer.
LOL, that is a good way to put it. I tried and tried to explain that to everyone so maybe these pics have turned out to be useful after all. I agree that a "commercial style" residential unit will suffice and I plan to suggest it to the boss man. I seriously doubt if they will require us to intall a true commercial unit.

Now that is an interesting idea that I hadn't thought of. I was visualizing the fan and motor as intregal to the hood. Can you describe in more detail your ideas conerning a remote mount. That is: would the fan and motor be intregal ? Or would the fan operate the fan via a belt? Or is it something else you are describing?

will be a safe install unless they start frying a bunch of stuff on that stove top.

For sure this is the most common suggestion i have received and I will ask Greg if he plans to do that. I am guessing that we will not even bother with permits or inspectors but I plan to check. My guess is that he just wants to see a hood that works since it is a small town friendly situation.
Lawrence
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I goofed on that one. I thought you would be defacing the mural. Did not realize that the wall in question was the "so close" one. Might still be possible if you did a vertical stack inside to just below the roof line, then went through the wall. You might be able to reach it from the roof to attach the cover.

the return air portion of an HVAC unit. There is a hood with filters that connects to duct with a fan at the exhaust end. The air is pulled through the system rather than blown through. Most are direct drive. Some use a short belt to get the motor out of the air flow. Varies by application.
>From what I understand, it is not the building inspector who is

That is most unusual. Asking is the only way to go. Maybe he just wants a "grease catcher". Did he specify that it has to be externally vented? Could you just stick up a SS home recirculator unit? The reality is that if they haven't needed one until now they really don't need one. Maybe you can get away with a "dog and pony show".
Colbyt
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Colbyt posted this:
The problem as I

I goofed on that one. I thought you would be defacing the mural. Did not realize that the wall in question was the "so close" one. Might still be possible if you did a vertical stack inside to just below the roof line, then went through the wall. You might be able to reach it from the roof to attach the cover.

A true commercial unit and the higher grade residential units function like the return air portion of an HVAC unit. There is a hood with filters that connects to duct with a fan at the exhaust end. The air is pulled through the system rather than blown through. Most are direct drive. Some use a
short belt to get the motor out of the air flow. Varies by application.
>From what I understand, it is not the building inspector who is

That is most unusual. Asking is the only way to go. Maybe he just wants a "grease catcher". Did he specify that it has to be externally vented? Could you just stick up a SS home recirculator unit? The reality is that if they haven't needed one until now they really don't need one. Maybe you can get away with a "dog and pony show".
Reply: Good comments and questions, thanks again. I will post again when I have some more specific information. Lawrence
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snipped-for-privacy@paulbunyan.net wrote:

Your posts are a little difficult to read as your style of quoting is a bit unusual. Anything you can do about that?
As far as the hood. I don't see how you could run between the two building without a hell of a lot of trouble. Running inside almost to the roof and then popping out the side wall was suggested - might work, but it's a crap shoot unless you know how all of the framing runs and are prepared to open ceilings more than a straight vertical shot would probably require.
Creating a leakproof roof opening for the exhaust vent is not particularly difficult if approached correctly. You need to nail down exactly what type of roofing is up there, but the general idea is to build a curb and flash that, then have the vent poke out of the top of the curb. You also need to make sure you're not creating a problem with the existing roof drainage - blocking a channel, so to speak.
I'm still waiting for those pictures of the damn fine women. It's strictly professional interest - I want to make sure they're built right. ;)
R
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Thanks to RicodJour for the post. He said this: Your posts are a little difficult to read as your style of quoting is a
bit unusual. Anything you can do about that?
I don't see how you could run between the two building without a hell of a lot of trouble. Running inside almost to the roof and then popping out the side wall was suggested - might work,
but it's a crap shoot unless you know how all of the framing runs and are prepared to open ceilings more than a straight vertical shot would probably require.
Creating a leakproof roof opening for the exhaust vent is not particularly difficult if approached correctly. You need to nail down exactly what type of roofing is up there, but the general idea is to build a curb and flash that, then have the vent poke out of the top of the curb. You also need to make sure you're not creating a problem with the existing roof drainage - blocking a channel, so to speak.
I'm still waiting for those pictures of the damn fine women. It's strictly professional interest - I want to make sure they're built right. ;) --------------------------------------- My reply: Sure am sorry if my post is hard to read. I am trying to clear and for sure I would be in trouble if I don't provide the quote of the person I am responding to. I have been responding to each point individually with the quote above the response but since you are having trouble I will try somthing else. How about I give all of the relevant quotes at the top of the post and then just give my entire reply at the bottom? I guess that's the way most people do it.
I think you are right to say that popping out the side wall is a crap shoot. I will know the framing runs since I expect that I will have to open up the wall enough to add blocking to the wall studs for the purpose of mounting the hood. I think the problem is that there may not be enough room between the two building to finish the run. From what I can tell from the ground, it is questionable. I am planning to go up on the roof for a closer look and will make another post when I do.
As far as the women of the co-op are concerning, I don't know them well enough to ask for a pic and would be unlikely to post their pics if I had them. I am afraid I would come off as a little creepy if I do. My policy is not to impose on people unneccesarily, man or women. I am determined to treat the women folk with respect in an environment where they are stalked and abused on a daily basis. The fairer sex don't even feel like they can even go out after dark by themselves and that stinks. These women are way hot, this I can tell you. Your comments are humourous though. :) There are plenty of sites that have pics of women as I am sure you are aware. Let me know if you need a reccomendation.
I hope this style of posting has been more clear. Please let me know and thanks again.
Lawrence
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On 2 Feb 2006 17:04:45 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@paulbunyan.net"

I"ve actually heard of Bemidji. I thought it was where midgets lived.
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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