Help with security

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It has been done a few times before...
Check out U.S. Patent # 3,987,654 which was filed on Oct. 21, 1974 and issued on Oct. 26, 1976...
~~ Evan
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Yes it has and I do have the full backstory on the Lock Technology tool you referenced there. The difference is that mine actually allows the sidebar to be picked (or decoded) instead of just decoded. It can also be built with 10 bucks and trip to ace hardware. But yep, the idea of exploiting open sidebar grooves has been around since the early days of Medeco and is certainly not new. Its a pity that it took this long to get them closed off again. I only used the word "inventor" because you used the word "Medecoder" which is directly linked to my reimplementation of the attack and not to earlier tools.
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What is better then Medico. Picking one if possible isnt as I see it knowledge to many, and not in you average amature thiefs timeframe or ability. They want quick entry , nit working on door for 5-15 minutes, at that point the would just kick it in instead
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Bi-Lock or Abloy are good quality locks which are much more difficult to pick... They are also much more difficult to obtain copies of your keys and if you lose your credential issued at the time you purchase the lock, you MUST have the lock rekeyed to a new combination and have new keys and a new credential issued... NO EXCEPTIONS...
Where are you located ? Locksmiths in the rural areas don't either install or encounter Medeco locks very often so therefore they are much less familiar with them and have never given picking them serious thought, yet the locksmiths in cities and suburbs know them thoroughly and are very adept at picking them, since picking them takes less time and costs the customer less money than destructive removal (drilling)...
As for amateur thieves, such thieves might use a bump key but that is highly doubtful... Much more common to see a sledgehammer or big pry bar used instead... Then you would see the glass/window breakage being the next most common method of gaining entry...
If you think that someone spending 5 to 15 minutes to gain entry to a building with the intent to burglarize it, then you don't have much imagination or common sense... It all depends on what is inside and how much it would be worth to steal... If you think that 15 minutes is too much time to spend picking a lock to enter without leaving obvious damage, then you would be shocked that some specialist burglars spend more than an hour methodically breaching very expensive safes... It all comes down to whether the reward (rich stuff kept in the house or the safe) is greater than the risk (getting caught)... Remember most burglars are caught when they are attempting to liquidate the stolen property for cash, not while they are in the middle of the actual breaking and entering or stealing...
~~ Evan
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Medeco is, by far, the most popular high-sec lock available in the US. You might end up being stuck with them, but Mul-T-Lock is fairly popular as well (though a bit easier to pick..except the brand-new MT5). As Evan said, Bilock and Abloy are very good as well (Abloy Protec especially). Any of these is going to be just fine for commercial or residential use. Burglars generally aren't lockpickers, but like he said; its about risk analysis. And the few that are; even fewer of them are on this level. For the most part, the only folks opening these things are the obsessed hobbyists like me, government agencies, and a handful of locksmiths (most of which fall into the other two categories as well). In most cases, covert/surreptitious entry is one of the last things folks should be worried about in regard to physical security. Getting a locksmith to properly install any of the above locks puts you way beyond most targets in terms of picking resistance.
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wrote:

Right (and I had the web site up looking at it) <slap>

Better than my spelling, for sure.
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You make some good points. My father installed the locks himself last summer new, so my guess is they are being picked. Yes keys were given out to construction workers, but those locks have been replaced as mentioned previously. he is thinking of installing a cheaper security system that will notify the police via phone line. The only problem is the closest police station is 15 mins away, so a silent alarm would be optimal. When the windows were purchased there were several accessories you could get with them, one such accessory is a little plastic tab that when engaged will only allow the window to open 4 inches. ( These windows are double hung, not casement). Its a great little feature that really works. The windows are made by kohler if that helps any.
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Your locks are not being picked... Someone who picked your locks would not have trashed the place, they would have gone' through your stuff, stole what they wanted and left it looking like no one had ever been there...
You had a bunch of rowdy high-schoolers who have a car who might have used a bump key if they are advanced... It is way more likely that you or your dad messed up and left something unlocked...
I still think that there is some opening you are not checking, like an attic vent or something that is being used to gain entry because you are so convinced it has to be the doors that you aren't even seriously checking anything else...
An alarm system is probably your only way to do what you want, but you are going to have to get one that is centrally monitored by the alarm company so that they notify you and your dad in addition to calling the police every time the alarm is tripped...
You think that 15 minute away from the police station is really 15 minutes away ? At the speed you can drive legally you have a point, but the police can and do drive much faster than normal vehicles are allowed to when they are responding to an emergency call...
As to your other posting, you might not think the lack of a valid occupancy permit is relevant, but you will find out more about that if another break-in occurs and you actually report it to the police... When they come out to take the report and investigate the "not finished" house will raise a red flag to them and they will check that out...
~~ Evan
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You make some good points. The roof is closed, but has a large overhang over the side of the house. The vented siding which closes the eaves are only snapped in place. Although the house is two stories tall, there is a large deck on the second floor which would allow for entry through the eaves and into the attic. Then all it takes is someone with a strong hand to lift the hatch and gain entry to the house.
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Google and view video at Utube on """Lock Bumping"" you wont ever look at locks the same way again, anybody can "bump" a lock except Medico and push button locks. I found a good non battery brand for 120$ and use them commercially if yr interested. Medico are on the White House and most any bank or secure location but very very pricey. Bumping is the "new thing" An alarm might take 5-15 minutes for a response, a camera from Soper Circuits can catch the Neighbor you know and now trust.
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Bright motion lights, security stickers from a real company, not those fake ones, screwed shut windows and reinforced doors, locks, lock recess, door plates help. Im sure its at night, so a few always on bright lights and many motion sensors have done the trick for me in vacant properties, another idea is buy a junk car and park it in your lot, just wash it and it looks like someone lives there. Lights inside on timers, use 9 w cfls, you can get 4 9w HD soft white cfls for only 2 dollars that wont cost but a few busks a month to run. Make it look lived in, a cheap radio on a rock station that goes on and off on a timer is a great idea, put it near the door. I do all this and my electric bill is 3-4 dollars a month on a vacant place. Point is everyone knows nobody lives there, change their perceprion to not knowing whats going on, and you have stopped 95% of the risk. 5 lights a radio all on timers might cost you 50$, a bump proof lock 120$, outdoor motion lights about 20$ a light. X10 has motion lights with RF remote control, you can have a driveway lights sensot turn on a radio and many lights inside the house so it looks to a burglar he has been spotted and the home owner is turning on lights as he aproaches, or ring an interior and exterior chime, or contact your home PC, but then you need a PC in the house. I have cameras outside hidden in motion lights with IR Leds that record to a cassette i set when I leave. But a PC with big HD can make monitoring real easy X10 works and is infinatly expandable. But the car, radio, bump proof locks are all mandatory in these days to give a burglar dought. Security is about deception, scaring the burglar and hardening of areas. I find you need all areas covered inside and out. Then pay a neighbor to do a walk by once a week.
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What aspects of the house are not completed... Built it in 1997 but "never finished"... Sounds to me like you have a permitting issue... You can't "use" a house for any purposes until you have had your final inspection and a certificate of occupancy issued...
You have power to the property... Why not get a phone line and install an alarm system... Last summer should have been a warning sign -- you should have properly secured the property at that time and not waited for an escalation like this...
I assume you found one or more doors unlocked when you entered and found the mess... Someone may have inadvertently left one of the multitude of doors unlocked... If all the doors were locked then the raiding party did not enter through a door as they would not have taken the time to lock the door when they left and would have left it unlocked to facilitate easier entry the next time they decided to "visit"...
As far as abandoned properties go, there are many many ways in which to gain entry that don't involve playing with the doors... If you are not going to monitor the property with proper frequency or install an alarm, I would securely board it up and treat it like legitimately abandoned property... If you are not certain how to do this correctly inquire with your local fire department, they will have information on how to do this adequately in a standardized way which will not impede access too much in a fire that public safety employees are familiar with and know how to dismantle...
~~ Evan
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There is no permitting issue. The house simply wasn't completed because of financial issues. As I said, no one has ever lived in the house. All permits are still open and the final inspection has yet to conclude. AS for not done, the house is water tight and sealed. All doors and windows are installed, roof tight and exterior completed. It has been wired, plumbed, and dry walled, but the floors aren't installed and all bathrooms and the kitchen are not finished. My guess to point of entry is the basement door. I was at the house again today, and all windows were locked and shut, and all doors were locked. I checked the locks for any tampering or scratches on them and the only one with any significant wear was the basement door. The rest were untouched. AS for boarding up the windows, I don't think that my father will go for it. The house has a brick exterior and any nails or screws would damage the bricks or mortar holding them together. One more thing, when I found the house yesterday, all of the doors were locked. Not one single one was left open, weird? I say yes.
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On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 13:16:56 -0700 (PDT), camryguy

Another post mentioned "bump" keys. Recently, there are stories of people moving into vacant foreclosed homes, take up occupancy and go some time before being discovered.
What does your insurance company say?
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Hello... Umm... When an abandoned property is sealed up the boards are often only caulked to the trim around the openings, the plywood panels are held in place by means of 2x4 lumber beneath the plywood and a longer one inside the protected space secured in a plywood and 2x4 sandwich with carriage bolts accessible from the inside only...
And yes, there is a permitting issue... You are using the structure for STORAGE of materials not related to the construction process which means you are occupying it without having the final inspection and certificate of occupancy... You should look at the fine print on the building permits, they are usually only valid for a fixed period of time unless you apply for an extension and pay additional fees, if your request for an extension is granted...
~~ Evan
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Listen Evan, I didn't ask if I had an issue with Permitting and as far as I am concerned that is non of your business. I asked if there were any budget friendly ways to keep surveillance on the property. I'm not about to cover every single window and door with plywood as mentioned above. Thank you for your input, but some of the information given, was not required nor requested.
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camryguy wrote:

Here's something that may scare away the do-bads:
http://www.personalarms.com/home_alarms/electronic_barking_dog_features.htm
http://tinyurl.com/y487mqr
I built one years ago with a recording of a friend's 170lb Malamute bark slowed down until it sounded like a Lion. Played through 15" woofers (no pun), you could feel the sound in your chest. It rattled the windows and any miscreants casing the joint.
TDD
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