Help with insulation choice.

Hi,
I have received five estimates for inslulating my kitchen (whose walls are currently open) ranging from $840 (cellulose upon completing the walls) to $2500 (high density, closed cell foam).
The estimator I felt the most comfortable with was representing a product made by Applegate Insulation http://www.applegateinsulation.com and estimating the job at $1075. Does anybody have any experience or openion on this company. It looks like cellulose applied kind of like foam.
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
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No experiance but the cellulose said it has glue which I have read is the way to go as its applied damp and doesnt settle. Is that aplied damp. Cellulose doesnt loose R value at extreme cold like fiberglass. But the price is alot for a small job. Open houses are done for not much more.
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Yes, that is the 'wet sprayed' cellulose. It won't settle, and it is the best insulation for the buck. Also blocks air infiltration. And is fire resistant.
s

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Aaron Fude wrote:

YOU can install fiberglass batts for a piddly amount (guessing less than $200). Do you really need the extreme insulation that the bids reflect?
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The cellulose is hardly better than fiberglass, foam is alot better, but those prices are no deal he is quoted.
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fiberglass is practically worthless unless ALL the stud spacings are perfect, he has no small cavities to fill and no windows and doors to work around.
s

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Aaron-
Wet sprayed cellulose:
does have a higher R-value than fiberglass seals up the cavity better than fiberglass does not rquire a vapor barrier (per mfr suggestion)
it takes a long time to dry out studies have shown about a 20 to 30% improvement in "overall insulation" performance so it is better than fiberglass
DIY fiberglass is a lot cheaper than spray cellulose or foam. If I had an open attic & was in the market for insualtion I'd go with spray cellulose.
I forgot where you're located so do you really need super wall insulation?
Foamboard (DIY install) could get you up to R-18/21 but the stuff ain't cheap.
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

But he says it's for a kitchen, which I assume is situated on an exterior wall. That said, how big could it be? If he shares a 16' wall with the outside, we're talking about 16 2x4' batts or 128 sq ft of foamboard. Still less than $200.
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Bub-
I would agree but I figured more like 30' of outside wall (I assumed a "corner" location. worst case" and I was thinking the R-6.5(?) isocynuarte ? foam more $'s
cheers Bob
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Very good answer and comparison.
steve
Aaron-
Wet sprayed cellulose:
does have a higher R-value than fiberglass seals up the cavity better than fiberglass does not rquire a vapor barrier (per mfr suggestion)
it takes a long time to dry out studies have shown about a 20 to 30% improvement in "overall insulation" performance so it is better than fiberglass
DIY fiberglass is a lot cheaper than spray cellulose or foam. If I had an open attic & was in the market for insualtion I'd go with spray cellulose.
I forgot where you're located so do you really need super wall insulation?
Foamboard (DIY install) could get you up to R-18/21 but the stuff ain't cheap.
cheers Bob
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You don't say if you're interested in doing this your self...but DAGS for Mooney Wall....yes it's an odd name. It's a wall insulating method between the wet cellulose and cellulose after rocking...it's worth looking into...
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Aaron Fude wrote:

far is fiberglass bats from the big box, installed by you. Unless you live in a real cold climate, and if you do a careful job, the fancy expanding foam will never pay back in your lifetime. Yeah, it is best, but it costs several times what fiberglass does. Cellulose in walls tends to sag, even the 'no sag' formulations. (IMHO, of course.)
-- aem sends...
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properly installed, stabilized cellulose, does not 'sag'....
s
Cellulose in walls

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Steve Barker DLT wrote:

installed? I've opened plenty of walls where there was a BIG gap at the top. A buddy of mine back home with a 2 year old mcmansion has cold wall tops in a couple upstairs bedrooms. Yes, I've seen the demo walls at the home shows, set up by the insulation companies. Call me old fashioned, I guess- I don't trust new stuff till it has been around a few decades. If I had a kitchen with open walls, I'd use fiberglass with a good vapor barrier, and pocket the cost difference.
-- aem sends...
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Well you can't install 'stabilized' cellulose with the walls intact. I can tell you that much. It has to be done to the open studs. I have some that was put in place 2 years ago, that i still haven't covered, and it's still just as tight as the day it dried.
steve

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