Help with greasing trailer wheel bearings

Have a new trailer that I had to put together, and have to pack the wheel bearings with grease. Not sure how to do it.
I have this grease http://www.greengrease.net/kitinfo/3-pack/3pack3ounce.html
The top is a little cap that comes off, and I can see the grease inside. The bottom is metal, but has a hole in it that is just covered by a thin material that looks like aluminum foil (the sort of thing toddler's drinks have that you poke through with a straw.)
The mini grease gun looks similar to this http://doitbest.com/Grease+Guns+and+Fittings-Plews+Lubrimatic-model-30100-doitbest-sku-585262.dib
So, how does the grease pack go in there? Am I supposed to puncture that seal, and if so, which way does the cartridge go into the grease gun?
I assume I take the wheel hub off to grease? Or not?
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Ok, the cap comes off, showing grease. This goes INTO the grease gun. The piston will push against the foil/metal piece on the bottom. You have to retract the plunger. There is usually a notch to hold it while you put the sucker together. Then, with the cylinder with the grease cart. inserted and screwed in, release the plunger.
Cycle the trigger a few times, and grease should come out of the fitting at the end of the hose/tube. This gun is designed to put grease in "Zerk" grease fitting. They look like a little round thing with a ball bearing valve on the end. If you can't find this somewhere on the wheel bearing assembly, you have the wrong tools.
Most assembled wheel systems should come already greased. If you DO have to grease them (talk to the people you bought the stuff from!), then you have to remove the dust cap (carefully pry it out), remove the usual cotter pin and castelated nut, carefully pull out the wheel/ rim and bearings. The bearings need to have a WHEEL BEARING GREASE worked into the bearings.
Again, TALK to the people you got this stuff from. A grease gun is generally used to lubricate things like ball joints in a automobile steering system, like my Jeep Cherokee.
Hope this helps.
/paul
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On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 14:43:21 -0800 (PST), professorpaul

I recall grease guns being used for thirty years or more on trailer wheel bearings. BTDT, having lived around salt water and boat trailers.
The reason I suggest bearing buddy dot com.
A local marine shop will have these - possibly!
Oren --
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Bearing Buddies are fine for boat trailers. The inside pressure keeps the water out but even they should be taken apart and packed.
If you have E-Z Lube axles they don't need frequent lubes. RV traielrs recommend annual packing. Even (Especially?) those that don't do a lot of travel.
http://www.dexteraxle.com/e_z_lube_system
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wrote:

Nice link.
Even a bearing buddy will lube the inner bearing/racer, packs the outer bearing also. Fills the spindle and bearings with grease. Also purges containments away from the bearings.
Depends on the needs and who's horse is in the race...:)
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Got it.

Yeah, that's what I'm trying to hook up to.

Local Harbor Freight. They didn't know. It was a trailer that I had to put together myself. When putting on the wheels, I knocked one of the bearings into the dirt. After cleaing I need to repack. I really didn't need the grease gun, but I like tools. The mini grease gun was only $5 (at Harbor Freight, of course :-) )
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Is there a grease fitting exposed on the bearing cap/axle nut?
Should not need to remove the hub, unless you pack them by hand:)
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Yeah.
Won't it fail to completely fill with grease, due to the pressurized air pocket in there?
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finesse
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http://www.bearingbuddy.com /
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All you ever wanted to know and more
http://www.rverscorner.com/articles/bearing1.html
Steve
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bearing buddies have nothing to do with initial packing or annual re-packing. They are for boat trailers to help keep the water out.
s
wrote:

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On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 18:31:43 -0600, "S. Barker"

If I bought a trailer..I would at least expect some bearing grease - already (initial packing).
I hand pack all mine. OP has tools already purchased.
Bearing buddies are good for a trip...stopped some worn racer squealing and got me home for a new bearing:)

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On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 19:21:48 -0600, "S. Barker"

Okay!. I've never bought a single trailer - without pre-assembled hubs, racers, bearings and a little grease...ect.
OP has some work ahead, but then he states he has a Zerk/fitting on the cap...ready for grease.
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1.. You can't pack wheel bearings with a grease gun or a 'packet' of grease.
2..
3..
4..
5.. If you don't have a bearing packer, you will need to pack them by hand.
6.. Put a glob of wheel bearing grease in the palm of your hand. Slip the wheel bearing on your index finger like a ring with the wide end facing out. Then tap the bearing into the glob of grease until you see it coming out the other side. When you see it come out turn the whole bearing, don't just rotate it on your finger, and repeat the procedure until the whole bearing has grease coming out the other side. Repeat this for the other bearings.
7.. Okay, now that we have the races installed and the bearings packed, we can put everything back together. Starting with the inner bearing put a bed of grease on the surface of the race and then push the inner wheel bearing into it. Now take your new grease seal and tap it into place, being careful not to bend or distort it. You can use a small block of wood to install it.
8.. Put a coating of grease inside the hub between the two races and on the spindle, don't be too stingy, too much is better than too little. We do this because if any moisture should happen to get inside, the grease will keep the metal from rusting.
9.. Now slide the rotor or drum straight onto the spindle. It should slide on easily. If it doesn't, the bearing is cocked a little. Slide it off and make sure the bearing is sitting flat and try again.
10.. Once it is on, place a bed of grease on the outer race and slide the outer wheel bearing on. Slide the washer on. The washer will probably have a tab that will align with the spindle, make sure that you line them up when you put it in.
11.. Now place the nut on the spindle and tighten it by hand until it won't go anymore. Spin the rotor or drum a few times back and forth and then tighten the nut come more by hand. This insures that the bearings are seated in their races. Do it a couple of times until you can't get it any tighter by hand.
12.. Now tighten the nut turn, no more than 16 foot-pounds. If you have a castellated nut, line it up with the hole going through the spindle. Install a NEW cotter pin and fold it over. If you have a retaining ring, place it on the nut and install the cotter pin. Never reuse the old cotter pin and make sure you do install it. Basically this is the only thing holding the front wheel on.
13.. Put a small blob of grease on the inside of the dust cap and tap it into place, being careful not to crush it. Make sure it is fully seated.
And that's it; you're done. It is not very difficult to do and with care and patience you'll be able to do it like a professional. As with anything a little common sense as you do the job will see you through any problems you may have. By doing this your self, you save about $75.00 to $100.00 in labor costs. Most wheel bearings run in the $10.00 to $25.00 dollar range.

http://doitbest.com/Grease+Guns+and+Fittings-Plews+Lubrimatic-model-30100-doitbest-sku-585262.dib
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Aw, shucks! Screw the grease! Just put the trailer up on cinderblocks like the rest of us.....
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On Mon, 28 Jan 2008 01:57:57 GMT, "Dr. Hardcrab"

Yard Ornaments?
Oren --
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wrote

Yeah, drive down the property values in the neighborhood (maybe burn some tires), buy up property at a discount, clean up, sell high, move, repeat. Been there, done that :-)
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Uncle Bubba? Is that you?!
Oren --
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