Help- rotted out wood at base of door jam problem

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My garage back access door faces the main wind direction, and depending on the season, wind driven rain or snow piles up there. Over the past 11 yrs, I've heavily painted and caulked the area, and tried to improve the drainage there, but if you look at the pic in the below link (sorry for how long it is), you'll see I still wound up with a few inches of rotted out wood.
The exposed base from the area I removed the rot from is concrete.
What's the best way to infill the open area? Quikcrete? Treated wood? Something else?
Thanks
https://www.amazon.com/clouddrive?_encoding=UTF8&aToken=5%7CuZEnZR99%2BqJvddqhXy99tIM3hIlX2zLuSObdim%2FyWWvzfMPDl1MaCubsliccVqYF2fQkj2is7GvUu%2BmIqqERrQrYfOurqrxkLSafd%2BbUE6qHIGLwdRT1gTqGSDH%2BssU%2BUJZFbX4bQr4PuBrYFDhL2%2FlM9a0AdplaqbZShXIJQ0iFc1YYxDp7SCTJmewv2A9myS7q%2F4OjmOo89QUV5QdC4FXk498Dwyv%2B&openid.assoc_handle=amzn_clouddrive_us&openid.claimed_id=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fap%2Fid%2Famzn1.account.AFBHVZZRCWAENOR2ZAW37JUS5CBQ&openid.identity=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fap%2Fid%2Famzn1.account.AFBHVZZRCWAENOR2ZAW37JUS5CBQ&openid.mode=id_res&openid.ns=http%3A%2F%2Fspecs.openid.net%2Fauth%2F2.0&openid.ns.pape=http%3A%2F%2Fspecs.openid.net%2Fextensions%2Fpape%2F1.0&openid.op_endpoint=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fap%2Fsignin&openid.pape.auth_policies=http%3A%2F%2Fschemas.openid.net%2Fpape%2Fpolicies%2F2007%2F06%2Fnone&openid.pape.auth_time 14-07-13T19%3A02%3A41Z&openid.response_nonce 14-07-13T19%3A02%3A41Z-5200075881140621062&openid.return_to=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amaz on.com%2Fclouddrive%3F_encoding%3DUTF8%26ref_%3Dcd_lm_gsb%26sf%3D1&openid.sig«vN13zvUVqL52ie2NUsmDEU7PE7xmCVvXnOftq79ok%3D&openid.signed=assoc_handle%2CaToken%2Cclaimed_id%2Cidentity%2Cmode%2Cns%2Cop_endpoint%2Cresponse_nonce%2Creturn_to%2Cns.pape%2Cpape.auth_policies%2Cpape.auth_time%2Csigned&ref_Í_lm_gsb&serial=&sf=1#Gief81c5-57c8-44ec-a150-b6bfd330e5d7&path=/
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Your link is no good so I didn't see what you have. However, I've seen other (many) similar. On my own, I repair with Bondo but anything that will stick well and not wick water would do.
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dadiOH
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On 7/13/2014 3:15 PM, DaveT wrote:

Common problem.
Fill the hole with mortar mix and use PT or plastic lumber to replace the wood.
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On 07/13/2014 4:33 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

+1
I'd suggest one of the vinyl patching mixes, specifically; they're finer texture and feather better for small patches...
<http://www.quikrete.com/productlines/VinylConcretePatcher.asp
for example; others available as well.
My experience w/ the Bondo for the purpose is it isn't nearly as water stable w/ time and it doesn't adhere well.
Tried it on the old barn restoration for some rebuild areas as a cheaper alternative to some of the other wood epoxy products--after 5 yr or so it's almost universally failed where the epoxies haven't.
I'd leave it for the body filler where it's covered w/ paint and not subject to as much water as this application.
For OP, it would be _a_good_thing_ (tm) if could raise that sill plate an inch or two to provide at least a little bit of a lip. Depending on opening and all might not be feasible; then again, just shortening the door an inch or so might be ok for the garage entrance if can't actually raise whole thing...
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On 07/14/2014 8:45 AM, dpb wrote:

...

...

...
I'd also suggest even don't raise sill to raise this area slightly and ensure the top is sloped evenly away from rear to front so will drain.
Then, if use PT, be sure to prime end grain and back sides before replacing and do _not_ caulk entirely; leave area for water to exit as it _will_ get in irregardless given that orientation, you just do not want it to then be trapped.
A more involved way would be to put a flashing cap behind the moulding and over the base...
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On 7/14/2014 11:06 AM, dpb wrote:

I've had to remove about 8 vertical inches of rotted wood. What about building up the qwikcrete vertically to replace the wood, and then maybe covering the whole area with flashing?
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On 07/14/2014 1:59 PM, DaveT wrote:

You could do that, yes, if you've got the room to form in place. I'd suggest if you do choose to do so then use a harder mix than just the vinyl patch and build into the form a rounded corner instead just a square box. A piece of a center roll from a reasonably heavy cardboard would be adequate for no more than this or use a piece of inside corner trim to tack the two sides together with. Then you don't have that square corner to chip and will look a little dressier, besides.
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On 7/14/2014 1:11 PM, dpb wrote:

I think I'll try that. I have a lot of non-vinyl qwikcrete which I think you're saying would be better than the vinyl version.
Where the qwikcrete touches wood, what prep should be done to the wood?

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On 07/14/2014 2:16 PM, DaveT wrote: ...

...
Clean and prime.
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On 7/14/2014 1:55 PM, dpb wrote:

OK - I cleaned out all the rot wood, replaced it with treated deck wood that presumably won't rot. I raised the base of the treated wood about an inch higher than the wood went before.
I used exterior primer on all exposed wood, then I used regular qwikcrete to fill in the existing hole and vertically fill in all open wood space (the base of the treated wood now lies on about a 1 inch buildup of qwikcrete - that should stop much wicking).
The photo shows how things look now.
My question is: what to do next? I'm not going to put in any plain trim and have it rot out again.
Should I encase the whole area using deckwood? Lay on more qwikcrete vertically up to where the base of the wood trim is now and try to make it look ok? Or use some flashing to somehow cover the thing up?
I welcome any sensible ideas.
Thanks to everybody for all the help so far.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/126231755@N06/14484553197/in/photostream/
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On 07/16/2014 1:44 PM, DaveT wrote: ...

Hmmmm....I can't tell for sure what I'm looking at and the shape of the fill in that is the dark area. What I had in mind with the concrete buildup was to form it out a half-inch or so at least in each direction beyond the dimensions of the brick mould so it became the new base but having the recess such that the fill in to that or a replacement piece would fit in as the existing. Looks to me like you've kinda' rounded over that where you're not going to be able to put in a piece of moulding now?
I still think you have a basically insurmountable problem with that being a well at the sill level -- what does the rest of the area around it look like and where's the overall drainage? I'd still think the real longterm fix would include raising that sill at least a little above the rest of the grade.
I'd like some more explanation and a little more of an overview from now before further more detailed explanations if possible.
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On 7/16/2014 2:11 PM, dpb wrote:

It's not a well. During heavy rains with wind there was area below the rot wood that was allowing water to get in accumulate before it could drain, and wick up into the wood. It wasn't apparent until I pulled things apart a few days ago.
No water has ever been able to go over the sill.
Adjacent to the door is a 3x3 ft concrete slab with a low drainage slant which runs into a pit I dug out a long time ago, with a grating over it.
I think this is going to solve it and I don't want to go the route of building up a sill and cutting the door to size and finding out that I'll need a new custom cut door..... etc. The door is standard metal with some kind of foam interior and I doubt there's any easy way of modifying it.
If this doesn't work, I would agree with you that the next step is a raised sill, but I don't want to go there, yet.

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On 07/16/2014 3:40 PM, DaveT wrote:

...
It'll certainly help but the door looks in pretty bad shape as well as near as I can tell. It's not so much that the water runs over the sill as that it collects and tends to retain water along the sill in all the crevices and crannies and it undoubtedly runs w/ capillary action under it and to the ends to get into the ends of the jambs and wall sections to greater or lesser degree.
That there was the hole where the brick mould ran below the grade before is obviously going to have been a major problem and I agree you'll have helped that part out significantly.
I agree w/ the geometry DadiOH suggests; it's the same as did I. I won't argue any further with him over it but Bondo is simply not the right product for this job.
The only other lesser disagreement I have with his advice is that it is counter-productive to caulk that seam at the bottom of the brick mould meeting the base; it's the same idea as the purpose of weep holes in masonry or not caulking the bottom of siding laps--any moisture that _does_ get in there needs a way to get out; if it has no way out then it becomes a dam on the wrong side.
I'm guessing part of the problem in this area is also that it is shaded a fair amount of the time?
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On 7/16/2014 6:12 PM, dpb wrote:

It's north facing. It gets sun in the am, it's in the shade in the pm, but it's wind driven rain and snow pile up that's the real problem.
I'm probably going to fill out the remaining void with qwikrete. The wood is already primered, does there need to be visqueen or something like that between the wood and qwikrete?
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On 07/17/2014 8:49 AM, DaveT wrote: ...

...
I probably wouldn't bother, but it couldn't hurt I think...
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On 7/17/2014 8:17 AM, dpb wrote:

I'm wondering if an impermeable barrier wouldn't stop moisture from getting -out- of the wood, similar to leaving a small gap at the base of wood piece to let it move out. I don't see all that much moisture going from the qwikrete into the wood. I can't remember ever seeing any barrier used in house framing where 2x4's lay on concrete.
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On 7/17/2014 8:17 AM, dpb wrote:

I'm wondering if an impermeable barrier wouldn't stop moisture from getting -out- of the wood, similar to leaving a small gap at the base of wood piece to let it move out. I don't see all that much moisture going from the qwikrete into the wood. I can't remember ever seeing any barrier used in house framing where 2x4's lay on concrete.
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On 07/17/2014 9:46 AM, DaveT wrote:

That was basically why I said I probably wouldn't -- as long as there's not a dam at the bottom to hold I don't think it would really hurt anything, though, but I don't see that it has much purpose, either.
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On 7/17/2014 8:17 AM, dpb wrote:

I qwikreted the empty area - not pretty but it seems pretty solid.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/126231755@N06/
I'm thinking of stuccoing the thing to smooth out the surface and make it blend in. Then I'll put flashing over the wood-qwikrete contact to keep driven rain from getting into the moisture gap I left there.
How long should I let the qwikrete dry before applying stucco?
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On 07/18/2014 9:03 PM, DaveT wrote: ...

Why on earth didn't you form and pour it as I suggested?????
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