HELP! New floor & now fridge won't fit under kitchen cabinets ( PICs )


Panic time!
I got a new porcelain floor in my kitchen. I didn't realize the new floor ended up being about 3/8 of an inch higher than the old one and now the fridge won't fit under the kitchen cabinets hanging on my wall.
How hard is it to raise the cabinets that are hanging on the wall? The section of cabinets is only as big as shown in the pics below. Or, should I plan on cutting a notch out of the cabinets to clear the fridge.
The fridge is as low as it can go, btw.
http://www.kevandshan.com/pics/fridge_1.jpg
http://www.kevandshan.com/pics/fridge_2.jpg
Any feedback is appreciated.
Thanks, Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@blah.com wrote:

Hi, Can't you lower the leg/cator on the fridge?
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THe fridge looks to be as low as it can it. It self adjusts/levels...
Tony Hwang wrote:

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From what I can see, there is a strip of wood on the bottom of the cabinet that comes down below the base of the cabinet. Just trim it back.
Have any friends that are very handy or do woodworking? it is a 10 minute job with a good jigsaw or a router.
Raising the cabinet can be a real PITA, depending on where it is attached, it won't line up on the top, etc. I'd go for the notch.
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Thanks for your feedback. I've been examining this further. It looks like where I'd have to put the notch interferes with where there are some fasteners that hold the cabinet together. At the corners where the cut(s) would be, there's a screw that holds the joint together. So, it looks like I can't notch out where I need to.
It looks like I can raise just the section above the fridge, and since I only need the raise it by about 3/8 of an inch, I think the molding at the top will hide the mismatch at the top edge (after I reinstall it) and I can drop the two cabinet doors above the fridge about 3/8 of an inch to keep them matched up with the other (unmoved) doors.
I have the section above the fridge all loosened up and it seems like it's in between the adjacent cabinets and the wall on the right pretty tight. I think I can just slide it up 3/8 of an inch and drive some new fasteners (longer just to be safe). Need to wait to my help gets here tomorrow though...
Then I'll just have to do a bit of painting to cover up the witness marks.
Hope the cabinets move up pretty easy...I'm counting on it. :-O
K
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If that doesn't work, just remove the cabinet. You can't reach it anyway. I've never used mine for anything.
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Hmmm. That's an interesting idea... Thanks!
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I put shallow slide out drawers in upper cabinets to enable them to be used without resorting to a step ladder.
On 21 Nov 2006 20:26:00 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Was the previous floor removed completely befoe the new one was installed? If not, it shoudl have been. Also, if you actually bothered to read the manufacturers installation instructions for the refrigerator you would have noticed that that it gives minimum clearances on all sides of the refrigerator, which you have alos most likely violated. If you trim the cabinet piece, what's going to happen when you have to replace the refrigerator? It's not going to look nice unles you can get another refrigerator the same size. Either redo the floor right if that's what caused the problem, buy a smaller refrigerator, or remove the cabinet, then wait until your refirgerator breaks, then but a smaller one and replace the cabinet.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What's going to happen in the same situation in a million other homes where you have a gap of several inchs between the cabinet and refrigerator?

Yeah, that;s sharp advice. Tear out an entire new ceramic kitchen floor instead of trim a cabinet.
buy a smaller

First, take a good look under the fridge to make sure it can't go any lower, by removing feet, etc. Next would be to remove the cabinet, take it to a cabinet shop and have them trim it down for you. I would think it could be done so it's virtually unnoticeable.
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where you have a gap of several inchs between the cabinet and refrigerator? .
Your supposed to leave some room (couple of inches) around your refrigerator on all sides.
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I was able to raise the cabinets above the fridge enough to make room and the molding was able to hide the mismatch at the top edge. Can't tell there was ever an issue. Thank goodness!!
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wrote:

I wouldn't count on moving the door, not sure it is possible, will have extra holes, and I wouldn't try it. Just look at it as a mark of pride that you have such a big refrigerator.
And why shouldn't the doors not be higer anyhow. Istn't decorative trim above a doorway or window often higher than elsewhere?
Maybe next fridge will be smaller and you'll want to move the cabinets and the doors back.

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