help me to open drywall?

I am thinking of opening a drywall due to sound of water dripping when furnace is running or someone is taking shower. It appears to me that the water is formed by condensation on hot air pipe, but I am not sure. So, the only way to find out exactly what's going on is to open the drywall.
Where and how do I start the project? Any suggestion will be highly appreciated. I am hoping there is a book or video I could refer to, but so far I have found nothing on this subject.
Your advices will be sincerely appreciated.
Andrew
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You could use a hammer. You could use a saw. Your choice. :)
Zyp

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bearing in mind that the wise choice allows you to reuse the piece of drywall that you cut out to gain access, to patch it when done.
randy

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To minimize size and repairability of the access hole, first locate studs/joists using a studfinder, then marking the opening between the studs below the leak. Then, if you want to cut a square out, use a utility knife to score thru the outer layer of paper on the sheetrock, and make two sides of the square bisect the centers of the studs, so you can renail the piece back later. The razor cut allows you to then saw the rock without damaging the sheetrock edges. Then using a 3/8 inch drill bit drill out corniers of the square, and cut out the square along the cut lines with a sheetrock or keyhole handsaw. Pointed sheetrock saws work best, and dull more slowly than keyhole saws. Once you've done your inspection and repair, just screw or nail the square piece back in, and mud and tape the seams. Some of the handbooks at home depot or such will give you hints at sheetrock repair, related to retrofit plumbing or electrical handbooks.
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On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 23:43:02 -0500, "J.J online"

Stud finder and then cut out a hole big enough to stick your head in to center of studs so you have something easy to reinstall.
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On 1/22/2005 11:43 PM US(ET), J.J online took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

Condensation does not form on hot pipes or conduits. Condensation forms when moist air comes in contact with *colder* surfaces. What you may be hearing is the expansion and contraction of pipes or conduits. Sometimes, it's a 'tick..., tick..., tick...' sound. Is there any evidence of water, or water stains, near the floor where you hear this dripping? Use a poor man's stethoscope; a water glass, with the bottom pressed to the ear, and the open part pressed against the wall. Take readings on the wall where you hear the dripping and all the way down to the floor. You may be able to determine if it is a leak or just the pipes or conduits expanding and contracting.

--
Bill

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You could try my method for cutting holes in drywall: http://www.wd40jobsite.com/secret_detail.cfm?idt8&c=1&q=&s=1
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv

the
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Find out the stud locations and mark with a pencil. Carefully cut the drywall (at least along the sides) down the center of the stud with a utility knife. This method allows a place to screw the removed drywall piece back into place. I suggest laying down newspaper taped to the baseboard to make cleanup easy. You might find an auto inspection mirror and flashlight handy.
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A hammer, and start smashing away.
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Keep in mind, as you use one of the man7y suggestions on opening the drywall, that there may be electrical wiring in the wall, and to avoid cutting it is very important also. Just cutting without this in mind is dangerous to the wiring, house, and person doing the cutting.
Just use a little logic about what you're doing, and avoid any mishaps, based on YOUR situation. No one but the person doing the job, knows how it is going , so be careful not to make a small job into a lrger one if at all possible.
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MUADIB
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