help me to choose a drill on a budget

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As a new homewner I need a drill/driver for occasional weekend use. I am on the budget <$100 but the less I spend the better if quality is sufficient for my tasks. The options I've been looking at are 1) 18v Skil 2887, $79 (or 59 refurbished) 2) Panasonik EY6405FQKW, $99 3) Ryobi 18V Reconditioned $75
Any other options? I realize it would be a waste to buy anything pro in my case. I want the drill to last however. So based on reviews Panasonic is aa clear winner but does it worth extra $?
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snipped-for-privacy@ucdavis.edu wrote:

Consider a corded drill. You'll get more drill for your money, won't have to deal with battery issues (charging, failure, & replacement), and you can expect it to last decades with little or no maintenance.
Something like this is in the $35-$40 range: http://www.ryobitools.com/powertools/tool/d46ck /
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Ha, I just posted a problem with my cordless drill. I had a Ryobi before, and it lasted awhile, but it just mysteriously started smoking and died not too long ago. I then decided to upgrade to a Makita. It's an awesome drill and I love it, but I am having a battery problem with it. It's also a little more than what your budget is set at.

before, the Ryobi was great, but it only lasted for about two or three years. I did a lot with it; remodeled the bathroom, put up cement boards, build different projects around the house...even dropped it in my pond once. So, it did a lot and took a lot of abuse...but died after two years. But for the money, it might be worth it.
Another thing to consider is the weight of the drill. I didn't think about it until I bought my current one...but you don't want to be lugging a 2 lb drill around all day long.
Good Luck!

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Skill is junk, Ridgid has lifetime battery warranty,
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I was going to get a corded drill but all the big names did not had a driver torque setting (not to kill screws with high torque at the end, have no idea if I am calling it right). As for the cordless - they have RIGID 18v R840011 Drill kit on sale for $99. It comes with lifetime warrantieis on everything including batteries after registration. Is it a decent model for in home use? The warrnaty sounds too good to be true - anyone had experince with it?
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Adjustable clutch

Never looked myself, but a couple of others have posted that they were happy with them. Worth checking at that price.
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Something worth having.
My corded Ryobi has a clutch. Not sure why you couldn't find one.
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Seconded.
The words budget and battery don't belong in the same sentence.
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So if I was to go corded drill which one? Again I am not pro, so I don't want to overpay. Thanks
wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@ucdavis.edu wrote:

Avoid the store brands. You can't go wrong with a low end Milwaukee, Bosch, DeWalt, or similar well known brand.
Go see what's on sale. That might make it easy to decide.
Be sure to read: http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/msg/4d5e1d4ed55ffcac
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snipped-for-privacy@ucdavis.edu wrote:

I don't know which brand(haven't used corded drill for a while) but I'd get variable speed reversible one with keyless chuck.
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I had a Skil 1/2" that just about twisted my arm off more than a couple of times. Don't know if the new ones are like that old one, but I sure was watchful when I got that puppy out of its cage.
STeve
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on 9/23/2007 12:09 AM SteveB said the following:

I have an old 1/2" Craftsman that will do the same.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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snipped-for-privacy@ucdavis.edu wrote:

If that is your short list, I'd choose Panasonic. I have DeWalt one.
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Skill and Ryobi are crap. Only thing worse than crap is reconditioned crap. Panasonic has a good reputation, but I don't know anything about that particular drill.
Lowes is selling a Dewalt 12v drill (DW940?) for $99 now; almost half price off. Some stores don't have it on sale (such as the stores around me) but they will match the other stores if you ask them to. I have two of them and love them. Only problem is that the 12v line is kinda short; almost anything other than drills has to be bought used off ebay. I don't know how extensive the Panasonic line is, but if it is deep that might be a factor.

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On Sep 22, 9:52 am, snipped-for-privacy@ucdavis.edu wrote:

I've owned them all, but the DeWalt cordless has a lot of torque for a cordless, more torque than I've ever seen on a cordless it matches the torque of my corded Makita. The Ryobi is crappy but they have a nice lineup and design ideas for re-using the batteries. My next drill will probably be the DeWalt or I'll just keep the one I "borrowed" from my friend since June. One caveat is that it is a heavy drill for a cordless, probably because it needs heavier gearbox for all that torque.
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snipped-for-privacy@ucdavis.edu wrote:

Ryobi & Skil are big box junk brands with Ryobi being a home depot "exclusive". Don't know anything about Panasonic.
For occasional use you might also consider a corded tool. More torque, no batteries to charge etc.
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 07:52:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@ucdavis.edu wrote:

Just about any electric drill will outlast most cordless drills. But, you will get a far better value for your dollar with a corded $100 Milwaukee and, if not abused, chances are excellent it will still be running 10 years from now. All of my cordless drills died. If you have to get a cordless, a DeWalt or Panasonic would be your best bet, a big plus if it included two battery packs.
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wrote:

way to go. Under occasional use, rechargeables die young, and 3-4 years later the odds of finding a matching battery pack for less than the cost of a new drill are slim. Corded are also more powerful, in my experience. And they definitely are cheaper. Unless you drill often, and drill more than 20 feet from an outlet, the convenience of cordless is more than offset by the short life, IMHO. Now if I was still making a living on construction sites, my answer would be different- I'd have a rig like some cabinet installers I saw- 2 cordless in belt holsters, one with a drill bit, and the other with a clutched screwdriver head, and a backup load of batteries in the charger. But these were commercial-grade drills, not DIYs, and for a pro, time is definitely money.
I do own a cordless (24v B&D), and like it, but it was a $25 impulse purchase off the remainder table at the borg, marked down from about $60. It is great for small 2-3 hole jobs hanging things on walls and such, but when I tried to do production with it (deck screws on a couple of replacement boards), it wimped out after 4-5 screws, and would not dog them down. I went out and bought a corded Makita 3/8 variable/reversing for about 50 bucks, and zipped through the rest of the 30-odd screws in short order. Since the corded would easily do anything the cordless does, but the reverse is not true, if I had to choose between them, I would definitely keep the corded one.
Under light household use, any brand name corded should easily last 15-20 years. Both of my current drills replaced an extremely cheap B&D 3/8 that I had used for over 25 years, but smoked the bearings on drilling through 45 year old framing, running wires. (it still spins, but overheats quickly. I use it for wirebrushing rust off the car now.)
aem sends...
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Hmm just 10? I have a B&D over 30 years old that still works.
The variable speed was never very good though so I got a corded Royobi keyless with a clutch. I was expecting that to be the last drill I ever bought. I think they last a lot longer than 10 years for the average homeowner. At least this homeowner, I doubt it sees more than 2 hours of use a year.
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