Help installing a pot rack on concrete ceilingq

Hi,
I installed a pot rack over a kitchen counter in my condo which has concrete ceilings. I asked a guy at a hardware store what I should do and he recommended I use two plastic anchors, and that they should both be able to handle 50 pounds.
I drilled holes in the ceiling (took a very long time, was very hard) and then hammered the anchors in and screwed the hooks that support the pot rack. It seemed very sturdy.
On of the anchors was flush against the ceiling and the other was about 1 mm out.
4-5 months later I have noticed that both anchors appear to be 3-4mm out of the ceiling. I've taken down the pot rack in fear that it might come loose and crash down on the marble countertop.
Does anyone have any suggestions on what I should do? Is this normal? Can I expect it to hold the load?
Should I add two more anchors to support the weight?
Thanks, Ben
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I would use lead anchors or expansion bolts, sometimes refered to as "thunderbolts".
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I would be uncomfortable depending on plastic anchors used in vertical loading.
There are many excellent anchors made for concrete.
Powers brand "nail in" are fast and easy. Tapcon if the blue heads are not objectionable. The holes must be drilled accurately for these to work. Wedge and sleeve anchors will all work.
Any fastening into concrete demands the use of the proper size hole for the anchor in question. Any hole in concrete demands a carbide masonry bit. Any hole in concrete is easier with the use of a hammer drill.
Here are a few sites: http://www.itwbuildex.com/tapcon.htm http://www.powers.com/mechanical.html
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Thanks. My girl friend refuses to let me drill more holes in the ceiling.
Should I just get one of the biggest metal anchor + masonry drill bits and expand the hole?
I ruined some drill bits making the holes last time. I have to make sure I get some masonry ones next time ;)

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You'll need masonry bits and a hammer-drill would definitely help as well if you are going to drill more holes.
If the g/f won't let you drill any more holes you may be off the hook anyway though.
I would suggest that you yank out the plastic anchors and fill the holes with wooden splinters. I've used splinters from wood cut for firewood in the past. Pack the holes tightly with the wood and then screw in the pot rack. Test it with your g/f hanging off it... if it will hold her for 20 minutes or so then it should be good to go.
Peter H
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That's what I'd do.
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Don't think you want to mess with plastic anchors - those are more designed for sheetrock and the like. And don't consider drilling without a carbide tipped bit, wood/metal bits are not appropriate for this work. I've used lead and expansion bolts designed for concrete. The holes may or may not need widening - the hole must be straight and parallel-sided to work, perhaps not the case with your high speed nonmasonry bit hole, which may tend to flare at the base, from length of drilling time. Unless done right, this potrack could be a real disaster.
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The plastic anchors are definitely NOT the correct device.
Use a hammer in (tap in) anchor 1/4" diameter minimum.
Carbide mansonry/concrete bit with regular drill motor, at a minimum; rotary hammer better.
I understand the g/f's issue with more holes but having the rack fall would be much worse.
The plastic anchors can be drilled out with regular drill bit & you can re-drill/re-use those same holes.
just for info; they have a complete description of the products
www.mcmaster.com Wedge Stud Anchors-For Concrete
92188A101 18-8 Stainless Steel Wedge Stud Anchor (I like stainless but zinc plated is ok here) 1/4" Diameter, 2-1/4" Length In stock Quantity    Each 1-19 Each    $1.26
91578A101 Zinc-Plated Steel Wedge Stud Anchor 1/4" Diameter, 2-1/4" Length In stock Quantity    Each 1-99 Each    $0.33
plastic anchors are generally not good for overhead installations unless you're talking about a smoke detector. Any substantial weight & you're asking for trouble.
cheers Bob
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Benoit Shelston wrote:

1. Lose the plastic anchors
2. Fasten with any... a. expansion bolt b. lead anchors w/screws or lags c. Tapcon screws
All require a decent hole...round, proper size. Lead anchors are probably the most forgiving. You should be able to use your existing holes enlarging w/masonry bit as necessary.
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