Help Dubya save gas, don't buy anything from Exxon-Mobil !

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Help Dubya save gas, don't buy anything from Exxon-Mobil! Pass this on to everyone.
I totally agree with George Bush that we should all save gas and oil.
I think we should first save Exxon-Mobil gas since it's the largest oil company and has the most to save right? Let's show George just how much we can save just for him!
We all have to have gas, but we don't have to have ExxonMobil gas!
So if everyone will please purchase their fuel and oil from any other company except for Exxon-Mobil, look how much Americans can save for George. It's the least we can do for the depressed Oil Industry. Of course this has nothing to do with the PRICE GOUGING BY MAJOR OIL COMPANIES and the OIL COMPANY'S MONOPOLY
http://foxfiretechnology.com
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Oil companies can manipulate their prices somewhat by controlling how much gasoline they produce and where they sell it, but they can't alter the basics of supply and demand: prices go down when people buy less of a good, prices go up when people buy more of a good, and prices go way up when demand outstrips available supply. The "gas out" schemes that propose to alter the demand side of the equation by shunning one or two specific brands of gasoline for a while won't work, however, because they're based on the misconception that an oil company's only outlet for gasoline is its own branded service stations. That isn't the case: gasoline is a fungible commodity, so if one oil company's product isn't being bought up in one particular market or outlet, it will simply sell its output to (or through) other outlets: Economics Prof. Pat Welch of St. Louis University says any boycott of "bad guy" gasoline in favor of "good guy" brands would have some unintended (and unhappy) results.
.. . . Welch says the law of supply and demand is set in stone. "To meet the sudden demand," he says, "the good guys would have to buy gasoline wholesale from the bad guys, who are suddenly stuck with unwanted gasoline."
So motorists would end up . . . paying more for it, because they'd be buying it at fewer stations.
And yes, oil companies do buy and sell from one another. Mike Right of AAA Missouri says, "If a company has a station that can be served more economically by a competitor's refinery, they'll do it."
Right adds, "In some cases, gasoline retailers have no refinery at all. Some convenience-store chains sell a lot of gasoline - and buy it all from somebody else's refinery." A boycott of a couple of brands of gasoline won't result in lower overall prices. Prices at all the non-boycotted outlets would rise due to the temporarily limited supply and increased demand, making the original prices look cheap by comparison. The shunned outlets could then make a killing by offering gasoline at its "normal" (i.e., pre-boycott) price or by selling off their output to the non-boycotted companies, who will need the extra supply to meet demand. The only person who really gets hurt in this proposed scheme is the service station operator, who has almost no control over the price of gasoline.
The only practical way of reducing gasoline prices is through the straightforward means of buying less gasoline, not through a simple and painless scheme of just shifting where we buy it. The inconvenience of driving less is a hardship too many people apparently aren't willing to endure, however.
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Won't work They will just sell the gas to another seller under their name. the only way to save gas is to actually use less. The Tuesday boycotts don't work either as you still buy the same amount, just on a different day. If you are serious, drive less and/or buy a smaller car with better mileage.
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And turn the A/C off, then drive like it costs a lot. Most anyone can improve their own mileage, no matter what their own starting point is.
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Turning off the AC can actually decrease mileage at higher speeds as the aerodynamics change with the windows down. Older cars needed a lot of power to drive the compressor, but today, it makes little difference.
A light foot certainly helps and I agree that we all can improve if we want to.
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wrote in message

Do you think driving 55 MPH instead of, say, 65 or 70 helps your gas mileage? I have noticed when I go South (where the roads are 65 or 70 mph) that I seem to get BETTER gas mileage....
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Dr. Hardcrab wrote:

Greetings,
People in the south do get better gas mileage... but it is because they waste so much less energy breaking for toll booths, sitting in traffic jams, etc.
Hope this helps, William
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

What a dumb ass theory. You've never driven in or around Atlanta.
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To generalize like that is dumb, but tolls booths do take up a lot of gas. EZ Pass helps a lot. When we had tolls in CT, I recall sitting in traffic for some long periods of time due to congestion.
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I'm working on getting that information with my car. It has a computer that gives "instant mile per gallon" so I noted the readings on three sections of highway that I usually drive a 70 mph. Each section is relatively flat for a long time so the reading is steady. At 70, the readings were 25, 24, 26. At 65, the readings were 25, 25, 26. I've only been able to get one reading at 60 and that is the middle one and it was 31.
I'm unable to get the lower reading yet as I'd be run over in the morning driving that slow. I was quite startled to see the 31 mpg and I will repeat it so verify it. At 70 mph, my engine is running at 2,000 rpm. This was all done on cruise control so as to remove the human factor.
The readout is also a whole number and I don't know how the computer rounds off. While it reads 25, the actual number may vary from 24.51 to 25.49. Considering that temperature, more or less weight in the car can also be a factor, that is close enough to see a big trend. Every car will vary a bit between speeds depending on gearing. I have two cars that run 2,000 rpm at 70 mph. I drove a smaller rental car on a trip and at that speed it was running 2500. My thought was it was a nice car, but I'd not expect the engine to last as long since it had to crank out an extra 500 turns for each mile driven and I keep cars for 150,000 miles or so. That could be an extra 75 million revolutions.
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<SNIP>
So cruising speed doesn't really have a lot to do with gas mileage (in your opinion....O.K., mine too).
I think it's more driving habits and upkeep.
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Depends. At about 60, the wind resistance come more into play that road resistance. Cars today are much more aerodynamic. I'm not done with my "testing" yet so I'm not going to draw a complete conclusion. Again, what my model car does is not necessarily the same as another due to differences in gearing and engine size. So far, the difference between 65 and 70 is negligible.
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Dr. Hardcrab wrote:

According the the guys at Car Talk, you get something like 50% better gas mileage at 55 than you do at 70 mph. Wind resistance, aerodynamics, and all that.
A
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wrote:

Modern cars have the ability to get outside air through the airconditioning vents without running the a/c compressor. You don't need to roll down the windows.

The airconditioner compressor in ANY passenger car will use 8 to 15 horsepower. Try this: Go up a steep hill at about 20 MPH with the air conditioner running. Turn it off and you can FEEL the power boost. Many people habitually turn off the a/c when pulling into traffic to give them better acceleration.

Agreed. Also take all that junk out of your trunk! Many people carry a surprising amount of crap in their cars. It takes EXTRA power to move that stuff. Nobody and nothing rides for free!
rusty redcloud
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Hey HG,
I love boycotts when they make since. We need to all plan trips to the store better, takes a few less longs trips and keep our cars, trucks, vans and SUV's tuned-up, clean air filters and an oil and transmission additives like AMSoil, synthetic oil or QMI etc.
SUV's get a bit hit today from everything from running people over, gobbling up too much gas, or voting for the wrong candidate.
Have you seen the latest headlines: Florida: SUV survives fire Texas: SUV runs over 4 people California: SUV causes major traffic jam Oregon: SUV causes major power failure
I AM TIRED OF PEOPLE SLAMMING SUV's! I have a Ford F150 that gets 16-17 mpg. I usually drive it alone everywhere. No one ever questions a man and his truck that sucks gas as well as any SUV. Don't mess with a guy and his beloved truck. Yet who drives most SUV's? Mom's that shuttle kids to school, sports events, and trips. I wishj they would quit slamming the Mama. At least she is not driving those old ugly station wagons!
Thanks,
Sozoman
===================Hurricane Guy wrote:

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Perception is much of the battle. Many pickups are used as real life working tools. Most are not. The perception, though, is that the guy has a legitimate reason to drive his truck.
Many SUV's really do transport a bunch of kids to school. Most don't. The perception is one little woman going to the grocery store for a loaf of bread.
The reality is that 95% of us can get away with a much smaller vehicle that gets better mileage, but we just don't. The arguments for safety, better handling on secondary roads, etc, just don't measure up either. Very few 4 x 4's ever go off road.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

The reality is it's not for <you> to choose/decree...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Seems to have struck a nerve? There are lots of people driving giant vehicles for no good reason.
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George wrote:

If it's good enough for them, it's good enough for me...
Point is, it ain't my job (nor yours) to say.
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George wrote:

Now they're 'giant' vehicles? LOL I'm one of them. But, I have MY reasons. FU
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