Help - dip in my roof (pictures)


Hello fellow home repair experts,
I have a 12 year old house, with the original roof. On one side of my roof, there is a sunken rafter which is causing a dip in the roof.
Here are 6 pictures:
http://www.geocities.com/phul/roof/South1.JPG
http://www.geocities.com/phul/roof/South2.JPG
http://www.geocities.com/phul/roof/South3.JPG
http://www.geocities.com/phul/roof/South4.JPG
http://www.geocities.com/phul/roof/South5.JPG
http://www.geocities.com/phul/roof/South6.JPG
I was told that it would not move or sink anymore, but I would love to get your opinion on this matter.
Questions:
1. What caused this to happen?
2. How severe is it?
3. Is it likely to get worse?
4. How common is this problem in other houses?
5. Any other comments or advice?
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2 Dec 2006 09:53:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@wongfaye.com wrote:

Getting "Sorry, this GeoCities site is currently unavailable." when I clicked on the links.
Good luck,
tom @ www.WorkAtHomePlans.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can't get to the pics either (Geocities has a max of 3 megabytes transfer per hour).
Assuming this is more than a trivial dip:
I'd wanna know who said it wouldn't get any worse and what they base that on. You could have a cracked rafter (only seen one of those ever), and I'd rather jack it up and fix what's wrong than have the dip. It cannot get better on its own, only worse, and when you go to sell eventually, any potential buyer will either be put off by it or make you fix it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi fellow home repair experts and friends,
I have a 12 year old house, with the original roof. On one side of my roof, there is a sunken rafter which is causing a dip in the roof.
Here are 6 pictures:
http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id12210781&size=l http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id12210783&size=l http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id12210786&size=l http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id12210790&size=l http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id12210794&size=l http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id12210799&size=l
I was told that it would not move or sink anymore, but I would love to get your opinion on this matter.
Questions:
1. What caused this to happen?
2. How severe is it?
3. Is it likely to get worse?
4. How common is this problem in other houses?
5. Any other comments or advice?
Thank you in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a 12 year old house, with the original roof. On one side of my

My guess is that the framing member wasn't nailed down properly if at all. Has any other part of your house shown the problem? Any problem with the ceiling inside? If not then it has to be the framing.

I think it's pretty bad. Residential roof are always wildly overdesigned and failures are rare even in old houses. That house is pretty new and there's no way that is right.

I don't think so. Since the problem is at the top of the house there is no weight bearing on it save the deck and the shingles. Even if the rafters are on 24" centers that leaves adequate support for now.

I have been up on few roofs as a roofer and haven't ever seen one like that.

Just document the damage and wait until the roof need to be replaced. Then you will be able to do something about it.
Claims on the builder can be difficult to pursue but something worth considering. If you can bring a claim against the builder right away they might agree to address the sitiuation when the roof is replaced.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A framing member might have failed.

Severe enough that I'd look into it.

Don't know.

Don't know but it happened to me and it turned out to be a non-issue ... but your sag looks worse than mine.

Can you get up into the attic and inspect the roof framing?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A few questions:
is this a trussed roof? how long has the dip been there--could it have always been there? can you get in the attic? are there any other symptoms, like cracked sheetrock, a hump on the other side of the roof, etc?
it could have been there all the time--basically a framing error. if that's the case, then it is a cosmetic problem that may be hard or impossible to fix at this point. if on the other hand, it is a recent development, definitely look into it. hard to imagine a rafter or truss failing, but it could be a missing connector or something like that. i'd say your best bet is to have a knowledgeable contractor go up in the attic and have a look see.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i think some pictures taken in the attic in that area would help figure out the problem, and how severe it really is
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
santa's got to lose some weight! :) we'd like to see the underside of the problem. what city is this in will determine the climate and shingle life. in buffalo ny if there is no leak, plan on fixing it when the shingles start leaking elswhere after 25-30 year age of roof. cover the roof dent with a photovoltaic panel: http://www.buildingscience.com/resources/misc/BSC_PV_Primer.pdf or a skylight or loveseat balcony.
snipped-for-privacy@wongfaye.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
buffalobill wrote:

This is like sending a pic to a doctor of a bulge on your side, and expecting an answer as to what caused it, how serious it is, etc. Where is a pic from inside? Is the area not accessible from the attic?
Like the Doc, one thing I can tell you is that this is not normal and needs to be investigated before it gets worse.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a 12 year old house, with the original roof. On one side of my

My guess is that the framing member wasn't nailed down properly if at all. Has any other part of your house shown the problem? Any problem with the ceiling inside? If not then it has to be the framing.

I think it's pretty bad. Residential roof are always wildly overdesigned and failures are rare even in old houses. That house is pretty new and there's no way that is right.

I don't think so. Since the problem is at the top of the house there is no weight bearing on it save the deck and the shingles. Even if the
rafters are on 24" centers that leaves adequate support for now.

I have been up on few roofs as a roofer and haven't ever seen one like
that.

Just document the damage and wait until the roof need to be replaced. Then you will be able to do something about it.
Claims on the builder can be difficult to pursue but something worth considering. If you can bring a claim against the builder right away they might agree to address the sitiuation when the roof is replaced
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Item number 3 below, "Is it likely to get worse" may need one additional question to be answered before coming to the conclusion that no additional weight bearing will occur. Specifically, is the roof located in a climate (like mine) where heavy snow loads are common in the winter?
Smarty

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lawrence wrote:

I can't see the pics (geocities won't let me, says bandwidth exceeded) but I was looking for a place a couple months ago and I saw LOADS of houses with atrocious dips in the roofs (they were offered for what I thought was extortionate pricing too, so I politely declined to make an offer.)
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.