Help caulking a bathtub

I just can't seem to be able to do this where it looks good. I've put caulk on my tub two times now; one using the gun thing ended up with big globs is places. I wet my finger like it said to do and tried to smooth every thing out. It looked just awful. I got all that off before it dried. I then bought the tubes that you just squeeze it out. That looked a little better but not the way I want it to look. Our hardware store has strip things of caulk. Anyone ever use these? Think I will buy some today. My question is how do you do the corners, or when one piece is used up and have to start with a new one how do you put them together with no seams? Thanks
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Use masking tape, similiar to what you would use when you paint.
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wrote:

Don't understand what you mean by that?
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He means that you should put masking tape along where you are running the caulking to keep the edges straight and the width uniform, just like if you wanted to paint a nice stripe where the caulk is going. Run the masking tape about 3/4 of an inch from the joint between the tub and the wall. One strip on the tub and one on the wall. Caulking will then stay between them. Pull off the tape as soon as you have the caulking in place. If you wait until the caulking cures, the tape may pull off the caulking.
The self adhesive plastic substitute for real caulking looks okay for about 3 days, and then is starts spliting where it creases at the joint, and coming unstuck. It's a big job to scrape of the adhesive it leaves behind when you remove it. Junk!
rusty redcloud
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than what was in there. I would say the line of caulk that was there was about 1/4 wide.
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then simply apply the tape so as to leave a a 1/4 line. you have to tape both sides of the joint.
another key thing is to smooth it as soon as possible after you apply the bead. if you wait any longer than necessary it will have formed a skin and trying to smooth it ends up pulling this skin around making it look awful.
also you really want to try not to fidget with it. try to smooth it in one go and call it good.
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On Sat, 28 May 2005 14:23:18 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

bead or what ever it's called? The more I did that the last time the worse it looked. Maybe because I have very small fingers, with kind of long fingernails. I will just do one pass this time.
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yep. incidentally you might want to wet your finger by putting it in water (i usually use the toilet :P ) rather than by licking it.

that's fidgeting with it. try not to. i've read, but never tried, that you can smooth caulk with a moist sponge. doesn't sound like it would work as well as a finger to me but it might be worth a try if you think your fingers or nails are a problem.
there's no question that it takes some practice and a skilled touch. I still don't do a great job at corners.
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She might try a teaspoon to smooth. if you get the right profile it does a pretty good job. I also second the masking tape recommendation.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

I have used a back of a spoon or a gloved hand (disposable gloves). Both have given good results.
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I'll second some of the recommendations...
1. Masking tape on both sides of the joint where you don't want caulk.
2. Appropriate size hole in the nozzle at a 45 degree angle.
3. Nice smooth pressure on the trigger and even speed to apply a consistent bead in the first place.
4. Plastic cafeteria spoon makes a nice finishing tool. I've also used whatever other rounded impliment I could find that matched the radius I was going for. The trick is, the bead should be super thin by the time it gets to the tape edge. If not, you have to either use a smaller radius finishing tool, or start over with the tape further away.
5. Once you get it close, stop. Peel the tape off and don't touch it anymore.
Bobby
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don't forget to best to caulk when the tub has water in it
Wyane

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Push, don't pull the tube.

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Just get one of those plastic caulk tools to smooth it.
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You can, of course, make it any width you wish. The advantage of a wider swath is that the caulk has more area spreading the load. This means that a wider application will usually last longer. Your tub moves! Not much, but enough that the caulk has to be able to stretch to maintain the seal.
rusty redcloud
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Use masking tape to define the edges where you want the caulk to end.
Run a strip on the tub about 3/8 inch from the corner and another on the wall.
Use a fine tip nozzle and run a bead of caulk in the defined area then smooth it out with a wet finger.
Allow it to dry overnight then carefully remove the tape - if the tape begins to lift the caulk run a razor blade along the edges of the paper so that it does not adhere to the caulk/

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Karen wrote:

It takes some practice - once you get speed, direction and even pressure, you have it mastered. Clean the gap with bleach. Dry. Lay down painters' tape along the area you wish to cover. Now - you practiced this and know how large to cut the opening of the tube (use a gun), push to apply caulk. Smoothe. Take up the tape right away. Since you have practiced, you got the caulk the same width as the taped strip so's the caulk does not lay over the tape. Corners are touchy, and it might work better to let one side cure before you do the adjoining side. Gook luck.
The sticky strips I've encountered were trash.
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....I've used both the painters tape and the wet finger method.
The tape works great.
The wet finger works best if you use rubbing alcohol instead of water. I also have many damp paper towels handy to clean my hands as I work. Dip finger in alcohol, smooth clauk, clean finger when caulk sticks and dip in alcohol again. Work small sections at a time so the caluk doesn't skin over before you finish it. If you apply too much caulk and it begins to get messy, simply wipe it off and do that area again.
sjm
Karen wrote:

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Thanks to all for their suggestions. I bought the caulk and gun thing last night. Will give it a go today. Thanks again On 28 May 2005 17:27:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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